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Post Info TOPIC: Ross's Parole in The Twisted Sword


Student

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Posts: 180
Date: Oct 26 7:10 PM, 2020
RE: Ross's Parole in The Twisted Sword
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Thanks for your input Hollyhock. I finally found an online site that specifically mentioned parole during the Napoleonic wars.  It said prisoners who took parole would have to "swear as gentlemen that they would not attempt to escape or take up arms against the captors until they were exchanged".  It sounds like prisoners would live in a town that had a "parole agent" who would look after their welfare and keep track of them to make sure none escaped.  As there were not many exchanges during the war it could be years before prisoners could go home (not until the end of the war).  I see why Ross would simply have wanted to escape and I feel he thought the opportunity would have been sooner than it was.  The article goes on to mention Colquhoun Grant and how he did escape while being transported to France!  I didn't really know that he was a real person.

It is reminiscent of the whole Monk Adderly story in that both involve the current codes of chivalry.



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Date: Oct 26 2:14 AM, 2020
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Little Henry, there's another possibly. I believe Ross refused the parole because he didn't want to voluntarily give Fouche and Tallien any power over him--since they were the ones who would have granted the parole. Even if he had accepted the offer, there is no guarantee that they would have honored it. They were vindictive and would have loved gloating over Ross. They wanted revenge for his tossing Tallien out of the house for trying to seduce Demelza. It was almost a repeat of the Monk Adderly affair. 



-- Edited by Hollyhock on Monday 26th of October 2020 10:59:19 AM

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Date: Oct 23 11:17 PM, 2020
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I have always wanted to know more about the parole offered to Ross in "The Twisted Sword" and what it would have meant.  Ross says it was offered but he refused and Colquhoun says "You would have been more freer, more comfortable."  (page 290) Ross says he was hoping to escape.  I wonder how much freer he would have been and if he would have had to sign in every night to a parole officer of sorts.  Later on (page 364) Colquhoun talks about when he broke his parole, not being happy about it and having a conscience about it.  Did Ross refuse because he knew he would break parole and try to go home and that wouldn't have been honourable?  I imagine part of the parole would be that he couldn't leave France. 



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