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Post Info TOPIC: First Edition Demelza


Graduate

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Date: Aug 21 10:22 AM, 2019
RE: First Edition Demelza
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Little Henry wrote:

She had been watching the series and said that the book was boring because she knew already what was going to happen. She started out enjoying the series but has now stopped because she just can't take the vindictiveness of George and Cary scheming all the time to wreck Ross and his family and Drake. Tears came to her eyes when she told me she just couldn't stand him. I do think his meanness was overdone in the series. In the books his decisions were more business based and if it hurt Ross so much the better but in the series it was a real vendetta.

Little Henry - I do understand your friends reaction. Yes in the books these characters are real. It's a pity your friend cannot try the books again as they are really very different from the series. Although I watch the series I always go back to the books. I think that no series can ever equal the books. They distort the characters and change the action and you have a production that has departed so far from the books that it isn't really enjoyable.



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Date: Aug 21 2:54 AM, 2019
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She had been watching the series and said that the book was boring because she knew already what was going to happen. She started out enjoying the series but has now stopped because she just can't take the vindictiveness of George and Cary scheming all the time to wreck Ross and his family and Drake. Tears came to her eyes when she told me she just couldn't stand him. I do think his meanness was overdone in the series. In the books his decisions were more business based and if it hurt Ross so much the better but in the series it was a real vendetta.



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Date: Aug 21 1:07 AM, 2019
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Little Henry wrote:

Stella,

I myself would NEVER NEVER EVER choose the edited version. I will never read it again but will read the WL version right through without comparing so carefully and who knows how many times more. There's only a very few words or sentences that I think are all right taken out. Elizabeth is harsh in the missing Chapter 6 but at the beginning of Chapter 7 WG writes: "The beggar girl, as Elizabeth in her DISTRESS AND JEALOUSY had called her . . . " This doesn't excuse her totally of course. I never thought that WG didn't like Elizabeth other than that she "couldn't make up her mind" but I'll think about that some more. In the missing paragraph I mentioned after the Assembly Ball WG writes: "Elizabeth was lonely and unhappy. Her marriage had not at all turned out as she expected; she was a beautiful, rather over-reserved, disappointed young woman. She was also jealous of the blossoming Demelza, though she tried to fight against it. But to mention children was to claim her immediate sympathy and understanding."

Recently I lent a copy of RP to my best friend and she gave it back to me saying she couldn't get through it. We have over the years exchanged many books and this was the first one she had ever returned unread. I was thinking of that when I wrote about lending copies of RP. I was very disappointed.


Little Henry - I do apologise for my misunderstanding. Having now re-read your post I see my mistake.

Have you any idea why your friend couldn't get through RP?



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Wednesday 21st of August 2019 01:09:37 AM

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Student

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Date: Aug 20 11:27 PM, 2019
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Stella,

I myself would NEVER NEVER EVER choose the edited version. I will never read it again but will read the WL version right through without comparing so carefully and who knows how many times more. There's only a very few words or sentences that I think are all right taken out. Elizabeth is harsh in the missing Chapter 6 but at the beginning of Chapter 7 WG writes: "The beggar girl, as Elizabeth in her DISTRESS AND JEALOUSY had called her . . . " This doesn't excuse her totally of course. I never thought that WG didn't like Elizabeth other than that she "couldn't make up her mind" but I'll think about that some more. In the missing paragraph I mentioned after the Assembly Ball WG writes: "Elizabeth was lonely and unhappy. Her marriage had not at all turned out as she expected; she was a beautiful, rather over-reserved, disappointed young woman. She was also jealous of the blossoming Demelza, though she tried to fight against it. But to mention children was to claim her immediate sympathy and understanding."

Recently I lent a copy of RP to my best friend and she gave it back to me saying she couldn't get through it. We have over the years exchanged many books and this was the first one she had ever returned unread. I was thinking of that when I wrote about lending copies of RP. I was very disappointed.



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Graduate

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Date: Aug 20 10:19 PM, 2019
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Little Henry wrote:

I have finished reading the WL "Demelza" and my comparisons with the edited version. Even though I was going through it methodically I found myself with tears in my eyes at the end. Such a simple yet moving conversation between R and D and I don't even know why Demelza's "Let me stay a little longer in the sun" is so touching. Still just a fraction of the number of word changes as I found in RP - most of the changes are omissions. The WL edition is such a clean publication, no typos but I did find a couple of mistakes which were corrected in the edited version. Even so the new version has more typos and errors. Many descriptive words here and there were left out which seemed needless to me but I guess if you are paring down a novel every little bit counts. A lot of the large portions left out are about the business of the mine and about the Warleggans which I suppose simplified the reading for a mass audience.

Early on in the book when Demelza kisses Ross when he tells her she can have two christenings the words "kissing her back" are omitted when Ross answers her. The romantic in me wishes those words could be put back. Also enjoyed almost a whole page after the Assembly Ball when they are riding back to Trenwith, where Demelza is terrified of riding with Elizabeth but they find common ground in talking about their children.

However, if someone asked to borrow a copy of "Demelza" I have to admit I would probably give them the edited version. The WL "Demelza" can be appreciated more knowing how much richer it is. And so, on to the WL "Jeremy Poldark". . . .

Little Henry - How can you choose the edited version of Demelza when there is a whole chapter missing from that edition? That missing chapter throws a lot of light on Elizabeth's character and real thoughts about Demelza. I have long wondered why this was cut from later editions especially as we know that WG did not like Elizabeth and so would have wanted the reader to see more of her dark side.




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Student

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Date: Aug 20 8:39 PM, 2019
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I have finished reading the WL "Demelza" and my comparisons with the edited version. Even though I was going through it methodically I found myself with tears in my eyes at the end. Such a simple yet moving conversation between R and D and I don't even know why Demelza's "Let me stay a little longer in the sun" is so touching. Still just a fraction of the number of word changes as I found in RP - most of the changes are omissions. The WL edition is such a clean publication, no typos but I did find a couple of mistakes which were corrected in the edited version. Even so the new version has more typos and errors. Many descriptive words here and there were left out which seemed needless to me but I guess if you are paring down a novel every little bit counts. A lot of the large portions left out are about the business of the mine and about the Warleggans which I suppose simplified the reading for a mass audience.

Early on in the book when Demelza kisses Ross when he tells her she can have two christenings the words "kissing her back" are omitted when Ross answers her. The romantic in me wishes those words could be put back. Also enjoyed almost a whole page after the Assembly Ball when they are riding back to Trenwith, where Demelza is terrified of riding with Elizabeth but they find common ground in talking about their children.

However, if someone asked to borrow a copy of "Demelza" I have to admit I would probably give them the edited version. The WL "Demelza" can be appreciated more knowing how much richer it is. And so, on to the WL "Jeremy Poldark". . . .



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Graduate

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Date: Jul 30 11:28 PM, 2019
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Little Henry wrote:

I am very happy to have acquired a first edition "Demelza" and I have been comparing the Ward Lock with the Pan edited version and I am half-way through. What a treat to read the original without all the changes and omissions. A lot has been said about the missing Chapter 6 and it has been printed on another site and discussed so I was more interested in all the other omissions including another whole chapter - Chapter 19. It's about Dr. Choake coming to see Keren after her accident and then Dwight also comes to see her. Four and a half pages in all but full of so much more detail. Now that I know the books so well it is wonderful reading extra details, small and large. There are pages left out regarding the Warleggan card parties and Demelza's feelings about Ross's going. Demelza was "quite desperately jealous of this sign of Elizabeth's continuing influence". In Chapter 3 there are 4 pages omitted which detail Ross and Dr. Choake's quarrel about the mine shares which explains a lot and in another chapter 4 pages are omitted about the building of Mark's house. I could go on and on . . . .

As I found in Ward Lock "RP" nearly every page has some kind of omission. But whereas in "RP" I found over a hundred word changes, in "Demelza" there are hardly any (only about 10 so far). Very minor ones at that (i.e. temperature changed to fever). The only one I wondered at was changing "ravaged summer" to "landscape", a much duller description.

Whereas I had read the Ward Lock "RP" thinking that the edited version was done by an editor, I read the Ward Lock "Demelza" thinking that WG had made the changes and it was quite a different experience as I didn't get so annoyed at someone else changing WG's text.

Definitely a must read for Poldark fans - a real treasure. I wonder if there are any other well-known books that have been edited but still have the original versions around.


Little Henry - I am glad you acquired a first edition 'Demelza' and that you are enjoying all the extra text. The more of us who manage this, the more conversation there can be on the forums.



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Newbie

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Date: Jul 28 12:10 PM, 2019
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Little Henry - thanks for taking the time and trouble to record these observations, which are most informative. I hope you will continue to post your findings. On the question of authors revising novels post-publication, I suspect that Winston Graham's attitude (of revising freely) was very much exception rather than rule. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was published in three volumes in 1818, in two volumes in 1823 and then in a "heavily revised" single-volume edition in 1831. This edition is the one most widely published and read now, although a few editions follow the 1818 text. After writing The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien revised The Hobbit to make the narratives of the two works more compatible. It would be interesting to learn of other examples of revision post-publication, but there are unlikely to be a great many. A few weeks ago I read a biography of Steinbeck in which was related an anecdote about his agent and publisher having difficulty in persuading him to help publicise a new edition of one of his novels. He told them he had lost all interest in that novel; the only book to hold his interest was the one he was writing now. His inclination, in other words, was to finish a book, turn it loose into the world and then forget it. Thomas Hardy oversaw new editions of his novels in 1889 and 1912, but resisted the temptation to "improve" his early work, even though his older self came to look on it as flawed. That, surely, is the more common view of authors, and, it must be said, the preferable one.



-- Edited by Kathy on Sunday 28th of July 2019 12:12:20 PM

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Student

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Date: Jul 28 12:20 AM, 2019
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I am very happy to have acquired a first edition "Demelza" and I have been comparing the Ward Lock with the Pan edited version and I am half-way through. What a treat to read the original without all the changes and omissions. A lot has been said about the missing Chapter 6 and it has been printed on another site and discussed so I was more interested in all the other omissions including another whole chapter - Chapter 19. It's about Dr. Choake coming to see Keren after her accident and then Dwight also comes to see her. Four and a half pages in all but full of so much more detail. Now that I know the books so well it is wonderful reading extra details, small and large. There are pages left out regarding the Warleggan card parties and Demelza's feelings about Ross's going. Demelza was "quite desperately jealous of this sign of Elizabeth's continuing influence". In Chapter 3 there are 4 pages omitted which detail Ross and Dr. Choake's quarrel about the mine shares which explains a lot and in another chapter 4 pages are omitted about the building of Mark's house. I could go on and on . . . .

As I found in Ward Lock "RP" nearly every page has some kind of omission. But whereas in "RP" I found over a hundred word changes, in "Demelza" there are hardly any (only about 10 so far). Very minor ones at that (i.e. temperature changed to fever). The only one I wondered at was changing "ravaged summer" to "landscape", a much duller description.

Whereas I had read the Ward Lock "RP" thinking that the edited version was done by an editor, I read the Ward Lock "Demelza" thinking that WG had made the changes and it was quite a different experience as I didn't get so annoyed at someone else changing WG's text.

Definitely a must read for Poldark fans - a real treasure. I wonder if there are any other well-known books that have been edited but still have the original versions around.



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Graduate

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Date: Feb 7 6:06 PM, 2019
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Below is the link to a first edition Demelza which has been re-bound and is for sale at 350. This price is, by comparison, a good one. I have seen some recently for considerably more and in poor condition. If anyone is interested it is on Abeboks UK - link below.

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/SearchResults?cm_sp=SearchF-_-topnav-_-Results&ds=20&kn=Demelza%20by%20Winston%20Graham%20first%20edition%20Ward%20Lock&sts=t



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