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Post Info TOPIC: SFTS - Comparing Characters with the Earlier Books


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Date: Sep 24 9:20 PM, 2018
RE: SFTS - Comparing Characters with the Earlier Books
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We have commented before on the date of the ninth.  There are several different months in which the ninth is significant.  Without wishing to spoil things for Dave, the ninth of October becomes a very much remembered day for several of the Poldarks.

Ross' mother and father both die on the ninth, from what I can remember.  Elections occur on that date as do several other events.  Perhaps it held special memories for WG, or maybe it was his lucky number!  Elizabeth give birth to Ursula on 9th and I think there is another birthday on that date.

Regarding Jeremy and Clowance - I think they do confide in each other, but Clowance is aware that Mr Carrington is not really flavour of the month with the rest of her family so this constrains her.  Her personality does change during the next couple of years - life hasn't prepared her for a man like Stephen - and she feels it acutely.

How many other members are reading TSFTS at the moment?  I am thoroughly enjoying George's financial predicament...



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Date: Sep 24 8:44 PM, 2018
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I am also re-reading TSFS right now, and one thing that stands out for me is that I can't help feeling cringey about the scenes when Jeremy and Clowance refer to their love troubles when talking with their parents - particularly with their mother. I guess in some way this is true to life, as these conversations are rarely anything but cringey... By comparison, though, it does make Ross's (and to some extent, even Demelza's) old love troubles seem much easier to handle for not having to deal with a concerned parent on top of everything else (at least not on a daily basis, anyway).

On a related point - it puzzles me a bit why there doesn't seem to be much interaction between Jeremy and Clowance, while it used to be just the opposite between Ross and his cousins, or between Demelza and her brothers? I would certainly expect them to trust each other before their parents, especially with matters of the heart.

And speaking of coincidences, I also noticed that the day Ross's mother died was... May 9th.

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Date: Sep 23 1:50 PM, 2018
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

In my complete re-read, I have now reached The Stranger from the Sea.  As usual, new things have struck me about this series I have read so many times and thought I knew so well.

The first thing I noted and actually have done before is how petty and spiteful George still is. With all his wealth, success and business experience he still has the mind of a spiteful school boy, rarely wishing anyone more than ill.  In his dealings with Clowance, although she turns him on, much to his alarm, he cannot allow himself to be even mildly kind to her in his thoughts because she is the daughter of R&D. You can imagine him mentally digging his nails into his palms to subdue his unwanted feelings. Can he not move on because he is so bitter about Elizabeth?  Or is it more deep rooted than that, something to do with his origins?

Although Ross will never actively like George, he has never been mean spirited.  He has become very much a mature loving family man, concerned for all his family and is really only wanting to be at home with them all - most of the time. Ross has against all the odds (and George Warleggan), prospered, not particularly financially, but by working hard and using his talents to help others. His personality is essentially the same, but now he is in a position to effect change for others. Apart from his family, his concern is for his fellow men; George's is as before, all for himself.

I still smile when George is so obsequious towards the titled: 'your husband, the baron' - 'your brother, the Duke'.  This proves to me that he will never feel either comfortable in their company or be able to accept someone at face value, regardless of rank.

What character developments have others noticed?

Incidentally, how many readers note the age gap between Clowance and Lord Edward?  Ten years!  Also ten years + between Clowance and Stephen Carrington.



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Sunday 23rd of September 2018 10:00:43 AM


Mrs Gimlett - I had not noticed the age gaps between Clowance and Lord Edward and Clowance and Stephen Carrington. These kind of details are often missed I find.

It is not long since I re-read this book and found quite a lot of material relating to the ten-year gap which is interesting and which I had completely forgotten. In particular, the relationship between Ross and Demelza "back to the early days, warm and full of laughter, intermittently passionate, always friendly." I don't know why I had forgotten this because it is very welcome after such a long period of strain in their marriage. They have clearly been able to put the past behind then - something George clearly cannot do.

Demelza has accepted that Ross will always need time away with some kind of adventure so his missions abroad make his time at home more relaxed and contented.

 



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Date: Sep 23 8:33 AM, 2018
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In my complete re-read, I have now reached The Stranger from the Sea.  As usual, new things have struck me about this series I have read so many times and thought I knew so well.

The first thing I noted and actually have done before is how petty and spiteful George still is. With all his wealth, success and business experience he still has the mind of a spiteful school boy, rarely wishing anyone more than ill.  In his dealings with Clowance, although she turns him on, much to his alarm, he cannot allow himself to be even mildly kind to her in his thoughts because she is the daughter of R&D. You can imagine him mentally digging his nails into his palms to subdue his unwanted feelings. Can he not move on because he is so bitter about Elizabeth?  Or is it more deep rooted than that, something to do with his origins?

Although Ross will never actively like George, he has never been mean spirited.  He has become very much a mature loving family man, concerned for all his family and is really only wanting to be at home with them all - most of the time. Ross has against all the odds (and George Warleggan), prospered, not particularly financially, but by working hard and using his talents to help others. His personality is essentially the same, but now he is in a position to effect change for others. Apart from his family, his concern is for his fellow men; George's is as before, all for himself.

I still smile when George is so obsequious towards the titled: 'your husband, the baron' - 'your brother, the Duke'.  This proves to me that he will never feel either comfortable in their company or be able to accept someone at face value, regardless of rank.

What character developments have others noticed?

Incidentally, how many readers note the age gap between Clowance and Lord Edward?  Ten years!  Also ten years + between Clowance and Stephen Carrington.



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Sunday 23rd of September 2018 10:00:43 AM

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