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Post Info TOPIC: Poldark Series 4 Episode 8


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Date: Sep 19 8:51 AM, 2018
Poldark Series 4 Episode 8
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Note that I didn't say that there was love in George and Elizabeth's marriage, just that it was the most successful. Elizabeth had no love in her to give a man (only her children), and George's concept of love was quite warped. But I still remember many times that they were in accord, and content, Times that were not elaborated on by WG because they had no drama. So the episodes of jealousy (and its consequences) feature more prominantly.

Also, I was not comparing their marriage to Ross's own (obviously far more successful) but to the marriage she had with Francis, and what she might have had with Ross.



-- Edited by Fijane on Wednesday 19th of September 2018 08:53:37 AM

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SPOILER ALERT FOR DAVE

 

 

I've always thought WG marrying off Harriet and George was a stroke of genius - they deserved each other.  She played him like an aristocratic salmon and cared not a fig for his dignity, reputation or much else.  She did enjoy his money though!



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I've always felt George was closest to being his real insecure self due to his upbringing, especially with Lady Harriet, as for example in TTSword Book 3 Chapter 1 Part 3 on his return to Cornwall....



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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I disagree that George and Elizabeth had the most successful marriage of the three, if you mean out of George, Ross and Dwight.

George didn't actually love Elizabeth, he wanted her, wanted to possess her, as he might have a precious status symbol.  He was unpredictable and sometimes unapproachable and Elizabeth had to constantly think before she spoke so as not to stir up his innate jealousy and inferiority.  That doesn't make for ease between a couple. Elizabeth, as has been stated many times, certainly didn't love him - she liked his money and the financial stability after years of economy and Francis' profligacy. I think she grew fond of him and admired his success in the mercantile world.  As two people living for the most part in the same premises, they tolerated each other and were occasionally close,  but I feel they each used the other to their own ends.  To me, that doesn't add up to a successful marriage, more like a business arrangement.

These are my observations from the books.  I deliberately avoided the TV series as Elizabeth was quite different in that.


 Mrs Gimlett - I agree without reservation your view of the marriage of Elizabeth and George. It is surely impossible to view a marriage as successful when Elizabeth had to resort to taking a dangerous substance in order to ensure that George would treat Valentine as his own son. I think George was incapable of loving anyone, even Ursula, whom he admired because she was like him.



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I disagree that George and Elizabeth had the most successful marriage of the three, if you mean out of George, Ross and Dwight.

George didn't actually love Elizabeth, he wanted her, wanted to possess her, as he might have a precious status symbol.  He was unpredictable and sometimes unapproachable and Elizabeth had to constantly think before she spoke so as not to stir up his innate jealousy and inferiority.  That doesn't make for ease between a couple. Elizabeth, as has been stated many times, certainly didn't love him - she liked his money and the financial stability after years of economy and Francis' profligacy. I think she grew fond of him and admired his success in the mercantile world.  As two people living for the most part in the same premises, they tolerated each other and were occasionally close,  but I feel they each used the other to their own ends.  To me, that doesn't add up to a successful marriage, more like a business arrangement.

These are my observations from the books.  I deliberately avoided the TV series as Elizabeth was quite different in that.



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Fijane wrote:

 

I had forgotten that line of George's in TSFTS, but in my opinion, it shows that a character's view of circumstances is not necessarily the same as the reader's or the author's. Of course, I can't be sure of WG's thoughts, but as a reader, I look at that statement by George and think how sad it was that he thought so, when it was obvious to me that he and Elizabeth had the most successful relationship as with any of the three. During their marriage, Elizabeth had the longest periods of contentedness (near happiness) that she seemed to have in her adult life. When George wasn't eaten up with jealousy, they were well-matched, and life as the wife of a rich and influential person suited Elizabeth very well. Her actions during the marriage seemed to be those of someone who was more likely to love her husband, even when we don't hear her verbalise it. That George couldn't see that, makes me feel that the jealousy still festers in him, and colours the past.


 I agree completely. I think Elizabeth probably could have come to love George if they had stayed away from Uncle Cary and Trenwith. Everything about living there brought out the worst in George. Especially Agatha and the Nampara Poldarks.



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(2) The flashback scene felt to me like a visual equivalent of WG mirroring the opening of "Ross Poldark" at the start of "The Angry Tide" - that's probably why they chose to repeat the Ross&Elizabeth-on-the-cliffs scene. Also, I didn't take the line "It has always been Ross. It will always be Ross." to mean that Ross was a winner - rather, I think it just said that out of the three men (Ross, Francis and George) Elizabeth only ever had feelings for Ross. There is actually a very similar line at the start of The Stranger From the Sea, when George reminisces about his late wife: "He did not pretend she had married him out of love: her love, however much she might protest to the contrary, had always been directed towards Franciss cousin, Ross." Within the setting of that flashback scene, though, it seems to make much more sense to put the equivalen of that line in Francis's mouth, not George's. And, just for the record: I did enjoy the flashback!


I had forgotten that line of George's in TSFTS, but in my opinion, it shows that a character's view of circumstances is not necessarily the same as the reader's or the author's. Of course, I can't be sure of WG's thoughts, but as a reader, I look at that statement by George and think how sad it was that he thought so, when it was obvious to me that he and Elizabeth had the most successful relationship as with any of the three. During their marriage, Elizabeth had the longest periods of contentedness (near happiness) that she seemed to have in her adult life. When George wasn't eaten up with jealousy, they were well-matched, and life as the wife of a rich and influential person suited Elizabeth very well. Her actions during the marriage seemed to be those of someone who was more likely to love her husband, even when we don't hear her verbalise it. That George couldn't see that, makes me feel that the jealousy still festers in him, and colours the past.



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Fijane wrote:

But I will always have quibbles about some things. Of course, the huge one was the dogs chasing Morwenna. Not only unnecessary and silly, but I felt that it detracted from Morwenna's feelings about being trapped at Trenwith, and how the scene with George and fleeing from him somehow broke the physical roadblock she had.

(...) The flashback at the start. I did enjoy seeing the old characters (some looking particularly young, and in Kyle Sollew's case much thinner) but it harked back to the very start where they showed the fake scenes of Ross and Elizabeth on the cliffs. I don't appreciate them trying to make Ross and Elizabeth's relationship more romantic than it was. They could have done the flashback, just with all three men admiring Elizabeth without implying that Ross was the "winner".





I thought I'd throw another viewpoint on the contested scenes:

(1) Reading Fijane's comment it occurred to me that perhaps the dog chase was meant to convey exactly what you were saying. First, feeling trapped - in the nightmare sense, where you have a bad dream about being chased by dogs and feel unable to escape (it actually reminded me that one of my very first childhood memories is about just that: me having a nightmare that involved a scary dog/wolf, and crawling into my parents' bed in the middle of the night for comfort). And second, removing that physical roadblock, as Morwenna falls into Drake's arms at the end of that scene. DH has said at some point that she's trying to avoid "internal monologue" scenes as much as possible in the series, so she may have added the dog chase scene as a way to visualise Morwenna's thoughts?

(2) The flashback scene felt to me like a visual equivalent of WG mirroring the opening of "Ross Poldark" at the start of "The Angry Tide" - that's probably why they chose to repeat the Ross&Elizabeth-on-the-cliffs scene. Also, I didn't take the line "It has always been Ross. It will always be Ross." to mean that Ross was a winner - rather, I think it just said that out of the three men (Ross, Francis and George) Elizabeth only ever had feelings for Ross. There is actually a very similar line at the start of The Stranger From the Sea, when George reminisces about his late wife: "He did not pretend she had married him out of love: her love, however much she might protest to the contrary, had always been directed towards Franciss cousin, Ross." Within the setting of that flashback scene, though, it seems to make much more sense to put the equivalen of that line in Francis's mouth, not George's. And, just for the record: I did enjoy the flashback!

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Little Henry,

I was able to buy first editions (Ward Locke) of "Demelza," "Jeremy Poldark" and "Warleggan" for fairly reasonable prices through Abe.com, but I had to shift to EBay UK for a first edition of "Ross Poldark" that I could afford -- it was the pound equivalent of a bit more than $100, which was more than I had paid for the other three combined as I recall. The copies Abe.com was selling were starting at more than twice that.

I bought the first three from a bookseller in Penzance (sorry, I don't recall his name, but I'm sure I can find it if you are interested) and got a first edition of "The Angry Tide" thrown in for free to get the package weight up enough to qualify for the international book rate. 



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Little Henry wrote:

Thank you for posting that excerpt once again as I had forgotten it. When I re-read the first books again I was going to pay more attention to Elizabeth but I must also include the missing chapter.  This gives us a lot more of Francis' feelings and state of mind too.  I must look into getting a copy of the Ward Locke editions.


 It is worth getting the first editions for Ross Poldark and Demelza at least. There are parts of Jeremy and Warleggan too but the first two books contain between 12% and 14% more text, all of which adds a lot to an understanding of the characters. It is worth looking around as prices vary and sometimes you can find cheaper copies in small bookshops in Cornwall for example. 



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Little Henry, I am sorry to have given the impression of disparaging Aiden's acting talents. That wasn't my intentions at all, as I love him and he is Ross for me (I didn't have a good history with the 1975 series). I suppose I just wanted to highlight the superb talents of Jack and Luke, especially in this episode. It must be acknowledged that Jack had some very meaty lines and scenes to get his teeth into here. It is always easier to play a villian, but Jack's challenge was to make that villian sometimes redeemable which he has done to perfection. But, like you, I think Aiden has been great.



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Thank you for posting that excerpt once again as I had forgotten it. When I re-read the first books again I was going to pay more attention to Elizabeth but I must also include the missing chapter.  This gives us a lot more of Francis' feelings and state of mind too.  I must look into getting a copy of the Ward Locke editions.



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Little Henry wrote

"Elizabeth is such a discussed character on this site.  People have such a diverse view of her I think because her character is not fully drawn even in the books and I don't think the series made her character clearer."

 

Little  Henry - I don't disagree with you apart from the following from the first edition 'Demelza' in which we are given a lot more information about Elizabeth. It has been posted on the forum before but those who have joined more recently may find it interesting. This is approximately half of "the missing chapter six" in Book one of the first edition published by Ward Lock. You may have seen it but it's good to be reminded. 

 

"Elizabeth came down the stairs. She knew the meeting had been over more than fifteen minutes, and she had listened with her acute ears as one by one the shareholders left. But Geoffrey Charles had wakened fretfully and needed attention; and she had sat by his bedside when he slept again, looking anxiously at his flushed fore- 

head and small clenched hands.

As she came to the turn of the stairs she glanced at herself in the long mirror and put fluttering slender fingers over her skirt, straightening and patting her dress before the last eight steps. Years ago she remembered doing the same thing that first night when she had supped here and her betrothal to Francis was announced and Ross had suddenly come in upon them, travel-dusty and scarred, appearing without warning, from America, from
Winchester, from Truro to remind her of her childish promise, like the re-emergence of someone dead. She had done it six weeks later, on the day of her wedding, when half the countryside had been here and they had had cockfighting after the wedding breakfast and Old Charles had belched and blown and won a hundred guineas from George Warleggan's father. She had not done it at Geoffrey Charles's christening, when Old Charles had been taken ill, for that day she had been too weak to walk, and Francis had carried her and put her regally on the couch in the hall before a great leaping log fire, and all her friends and relations had gathered round to pay their respects and to admire Geoffrey Charles.

Somehow that day had marked the peak of her happiness: from that day, from that evening, contentment had slowly receded, been grasped at, yet even while seeming to be held had slipped away. Old Charles had been carried like a mountain to bed, and the superstitious had thought it an omen. She had quarrelled with Francis over something, and, however much one might pretend, there had never been quite a reconciliation because at the bottom of the trivial split lay something immovable and bedded in their temperaments.

In those early years she had been young and tremulous, quick to relish happiness, quick to plunge into sorrow; all her feelings had lived so near the surface of everyday life that they were open to the lightest tread of circumstance. She remembered how sick in heart she had felt on that early spring morning when Ross had called in and suddenly taxed her with faithlessness and broken promises. They were both very young then, both very much in earnest, both rather naive.

Now, now, she was so mature, mistress of this house and the property that went with it. The squire's wife, used to her position and the responsibilities. Used to controlling her feelings and masking her disappointments. How she had changed! Not outwardly; there was very little, she thought, to see outwardly (after all, twenty-four was not a great age and she had only had one child) but inwardly the difference was great.

She went down into the big hall, lit now only by a single candelabra, walked across the rugs and the polished oak and entered the big parlour.

The rest of the candles had been brought in here. Francis stood by the uncurtained window, staring out at his shadow thrown across the candle-lit shrubbery. Verity was not here; she was glad Verity was not here.

He was holding his long pipe in one hand, but it had gone out. The smell of his tobacco made her wrinkle her nose. He was as neat as always, fair hair shining above the tall collar of his wide-skirted red velvet coat. He had broadened a good deal in these few years, and it made him look older than he was.

She clicked the handle of the door, but he did not turn. She went and stood beside him at the window. Three great moths were beating against the uneven panes. A faint scent of bergamot--relic of Mrs. Trenwith--now came to her nostrils and sent her mind swiftly back to another concern.

"Geoffrey Charles is feverish," she said. "I hope and pray he has not taken the infection."

She knew by his slightly stiffened shoulders that she had said the wrong thing.

"You have hoped and prayed that for the better part of four days and he has not taken it yet. You know he is always up and down."

"Yes, but to-night he vomited after his supper. Verity was not there so I had to help Mrs. Tabb with his clothes."

"Where could he have got it? You have not let him out of the grounds in four weeks."

"Mary Bartle's brother has taken it, and Mary Bartle was home on Sunday. Had I known she should not have come back!"

"My dear, we can't proscribe the movements of all the servants," he said irritably. "Since we do not live on a desert island, we are obliged-----"

Verity came in.

"Is it good news, Francis?" she said. "I fancied by what I heard Mr. Trencrom say as he mounted his horse..."

Elizabeth bit her lip.

Francis said: "We are to continue for at least another three months. The eighty fathom level is to go, but that has been disappointing for some time and will not matter."

Verity's sallow face glowed. "Thank God for it! That may yet see us beyond Christmas, and conditions must surely better themselves by then. I could not think of those many hundreds destitute. "

"To say nothing of ourselves," Francis observed.

"What a triumph for you, Francis!" she said. "How did you ever persuade them?"

"The Warleggans are advancing no more; but they have agreed to accept suspension of interest payments. As for the rest, Mr. Trencrom--who I fancy by reason of his smuggling concerns is the richest of the rest of us--Mr. Trencrom, Mr. Sugden and Mrs. Trenwith will bear the risk between them."

"That is splendid. Is it not, Elizabeth?"

"Yes, indeed." Elizabeth was glad and relieved, but the gladness was not in her voice. Verity's enthusiasm, however innocent, had forestalled her own, therefore her own would be suspect. She had missed her opportunity to say the right thing at the right time.

Francis relit his pipe. "Geoffrey Charles has vomited his supper; and Elizabeth fears he has the smallpox, a quartan ague and the summer fever."

Verity glanced from one to the other, aware now that something had arisen between them.

"You should have called me. Does he sweat? I gave Aunt Agatha a Dr. James's powder and she will soon sweat her cold out. Perhaps Geoffrey Charles has taken her chill."

"He has quite a little fever on him," Elizabeth said. "I thought to do what Dr. Choake says and light a fire and wrap him in a blanket before it."

"Is he awake?"

"He was sleeping when I came down."

"Then would it not be better to leave him? He may have slept it away by the morning."

"I thought there should be a fire."

Verity pushed back her hair. "Yes. Perhaps you're right, Elizabeth. I will go and tell Mrs. Tabb."

She went off, glad of an excuse to escape.

There was silence for a minute in the parlour, then Elizabeth took up the snuffers and began snuffing the candles.

Francis gathered some papers and sat in a chair.

She said: "The meeting was a long one. I suppose there were many for closing down the mine?"

"All the small fry, the little buzzing beetles with twenty guineas to lose. I do not know why Great Aunt Tremenheere had so many progeny. They have bred like rabbits and they chatter like monkeys."

"We should have put them up for the night," she said. "They think ill of us because you will not entertain them."

"Nor would I if I were bankrupt to-morrow. Little yappers, one and all. Mr. Farthing, that red-eyed ferret Cousin Ellen married --he never was a Poldark nor never even a Trenwith--had the impudence to lecture me on gaming pleasures. As if that would help the price of copper!"

Elizabeth was silent. Francis glanced at her.

"No doubt you find yourself in agreement with Mr. Farthing."

She bent her graceful head over a candle guttering low; a faint monstrous cloud shadow moved on the fine plaster ceiling. Sometimes of late he had challenged her like this, as if preferring her downright opposition to unspoken disapproval. She might have thought it a good sign, showing as it did that her opinion was still of importance to him; but the best of the situation she was inclined to take for granted, and the worst roused some latent obduracy in her spirit which went curiously with her delicate form.

"No," she said. "But is not gaming for good times and not for bad?"

Her aloofness--which he had helped to create--as always irritated him. He could not reach her in her ivory tower of poised unspotted delicacy.

"Gaming is for all times, my love. With eating, drinking, hunting and loving, it makes one of the five primaries." He reached for a decanter glimmering red with port. "As Cousin Ross has recently rediscovered, thanks to his visits to the Warleggans. I must ask George how much he won on his last visit. I was a thought preoccupied myself and did not take note; but he has been splashing money at a lavish rate ever since."

"What do you mean?" she asked.

Francis raised an eyebrow. As always, mention Ross and her interest quickened.

"Well, his two christening parties, you know. And but the other day he squeezed Tom Choake out of his precious mine by paying a monstrous price for Choake's shares. I wish someone would offer half the price per share for ours in Grambler."

"Perhaps it is rumour. Who told you?"

"Notary Pearce. And Tom Choake confirmed it to-night when I tackled him. That was why they were not at the party. Tom has refused to continue as bal-surgeon, and they are hard set to find a man in his place."

"Well, Ross is making money at Wheal Leisure."

"There is a modest profit, nothing spectacular. For my part, if I was in his place and had a little money for the first time in years, I should get me a few new servants to supplant those Paynters, who slop about as if the place was their own by deed of gift. After all, he owes something to his station."

"Perhaps his little wife would not welcome new servants," Elizabeth said, "lest she should be mistaken for one of them."

"She'll learn quick enough," said Francis irritatingly. "I confess I found her entertaining enough at Christmas time. As for Tuesday, well, one cannot be blamed too harsh for one's relatives."

"That is what people will be saying of us if Demelza tries to play the great lady before she has even learned to play the small one."

Francis puffed at his pipe. He had not looked at it that way before. Then he laughed.

"My dear, when I think of some of the people who are accepted into our society I do not fear for Demelza."

Elizabeth stiffened.

"Whom do you mean?"

"Well, what is Polly Choake but a brewer's daughter. What is George Warleggan but a smith's grandson? What is Odgers but a half-starved little lackey with a horse collar and a horse wig? Damn me, I'm a good Cornishman and should rather mix with a sumpman's daughter any day of the month!"

Coming down into the arena, Elizabeth said suddenly, whitely:

"I wonder you did not marry one."

The attack was unexpected.

Francis took his pipe from his mouth and stared at the bole for some moments.

"I don't question your sincerity in saying that. But I doubt your wisdom."

"How dare you!" She turned on him tremulously. "Do you suggest that all the obligation of the marriage has been on my side--!"

"No, but it would be unwise to assume it has been all on mine."

"--How can you say that I haven't done everything to help you ! You would find no one who could have done better. I have had as my only thought the care of yourself and your father, your house and your child. I have sat here alone in this parlour night after night, week after week, while you have been gaming away your inheritance and your son's inheritance!  I have done everything possible to cut down our expense in these difficult times, while you have thrown money on the card-tables and drunk yourself into a--into a stupor. I have never known your thanks or your praise. You keep your thanks for--for I know not what strumpet and your praise for the beggar girl Ross has married!"

With tears on her cheeks she went quickly from the room, leaving the door open behind her. He could hear her running up the stairs.

She had never spoken like this before. If a sharp response was what he had been seeking, then he should have been satisfied. But the breach was wider than it had ever been before, it was open, undisguised.

He sat in his chair drawing quietly at his pipe, a thoughtful look on his handsome dissipated face. All she said was true. He admitted it was all true. She had seen to his house and graced his table. She had raised the standard of the household manners from the sloppy level at which Old Charles had left them. George Warleggan and many others, he knew, envied him his luck. She had borne him a son, and cared for that son passionately--too passionately. She had made him a dignified beautiful wife of the highest integrity, with true ideals, good principles and capable understanding. She had even, sometimes, shared his bed. She had honoured him. She had quite frequently obeyed him. She did not love him and she never had.

 

Francis reached for the decanter."



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I find I must say something in defense of Aidan Turner as I have enjoyed his acting so much.  He has embodied Ross and has had to convey every emotion known to man throughout the series.  My favourite scene of his is when he looks back to the cliff where Demelza is when he is leaving for France.  I felt he conveyed so much feeling in one look and was glad his facial expression was not overdone.  However I have no credentials in critiquing acting and I also have not been able to have another look at the scenes in the finale where all three of them are together.  All the actors have done a stellar job.  One thing I look for in an actor is being able to understand what they are saying (literally) and I can understand Aidan 99% of the time.  I find I have to rewind a lot of Luke Norris's lines and wish he would speak up a bit.

Elizabeth is such a discussed character on this site.  People have such a diverse view of her I think because her character is not fully drawn even in the books and I don't think the series made her character clearer.  I always thought she was kind though.  Drake felt this instinctively when he went to see her and he was right.  I think the series said it right that she was born to be admired and she loved it and also wanted to please all who admired her.  I wonder if WG started out thinking she would give birth to a child by the three men and through his magic writing made it possible.

Tabetha, enjoy your Cornish holiday.  My husband and I were there last September for 2 weeks and had a wonderful time.



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So many interesting and brilliant points by you all.

I totally agree that Elizabeth's only redeeming feature was her love for her children. She did not have such instinctive kindness for anyone else.

I liked a scene which showed her appearing a little surprised when Demelza gave her respect, kind words and unspoken forgiveness.........you'd have thought that after Demelza losing a child and nearly dying herself following caring for Elizabeth & family, she would have never forgotten how selfless Demelza was.

When I read the books a long time ago I was not upset when Elizabeth died, I just thought ding dong the witch is dead! 

I couldn't agree more that some of the other male actors have been outstanding. Jack Farthing's range of emotions in this one single episode was impressive, he is a true star in this adaptation. On hearing that he has studied the scripts so closely that he practically knows everyone's lines, it only confirms what a true professional he is.

I was not a huge fan of the flashback, but understood that it was a good visual way to remind the viewer of the history of the relationships of the characters, if you had not read the books this was probably good to see.

All in all, I think this was my favourite series so far. Every episode was packed, without feeling rushed. I have never known TV holding my attention so well, and an hour of my life go so quickly!

I am obviously looking forward to the next series already, I wonder what the rumours that worry Mrs Enys are exactly?

I will be going to Cornwall for my holiday this year in September, seeing my beautiful Cornwall for eight Sunday nights has wet my appetite.

 

 



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A good end to what has been quite a faithful and enjoyable series. Like episode 7, the pacing was much better, and I thought they did a good job of combining some separate scenes into single ones to save time. For example, the way the two doctors (Enys and Choake) attended Elizabeth. I can't remember, was Choake in the room when Dwight examined E for the last time? If so, that was probably the reason she didn't say anything about the liquid.

So much of this episode was true to the books, especially the George and Elizabeth scenes (plus Morwenna). But I will always have quibbles about some things. Of course, the huge one was the dogs chasing Morwenna. Not only unnecessary and silly, but I felt that it detracted from Morwenna's feelings about being trapped at Trenwith, and how the scene with George and fleeing from him somehow broke the physical roadblock she had.

The second quibble was once again (I feel like a broken record on this point!) truncating an important scene, this time Ross and Caroline's analysis of what happened in London. Instead of gently teasing out Ross's psychological state, they replaced it with a blunt flashback-y type of aha moment. This whole storyline was so subtle and complex in the books, but they denigrated it to "Ross couldn't kill Hugh, so he chose Adderley instead". It also denigrated Caroline's influence over both Ross and Demelza.

Elizabeth's death (the physical part) was a bit tame, but the story was brilliantly done by all involved. I have heard quite a few non-book readers who are devastated that the "tragic Elizabeth" died, which I find discordant to my feelings about her book character, where her death seemed like the logical outcome. This is a big reason why I didn't like the flashback at the start. I did enjoy seeing the old characters (some looking particularly young, and in Kyle Sollew's case much thinner) but it harked back to the very start where they showed the fake scenes of Ross and Elizabeth on the cliffs. I don't appreciate them trying to make Ross and Elizabeth's relationship more romantic than it was. They could have done the flashback, just with all three men admiring Elizabeth without implying that Ross was the "winner".

I thought the wrapping up of Ross and Demelza's storyline was good, if a little superficial. As usual, the best lines were WG's. Drake and Morwenna's was good, too, although it could have done with more time to build the suspense.

Finally, I have to admit this (but don't want to) but when you have Jack Farthing, Luke Norris and Aiden Turner in so many scenes together, I am afraid that Aiden's acting talents look lacking especially his lack of range of facial expressions. The other two beat him hands down.



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Smollett wrote:

Another quick thought re this ep- during the flashback sequence at Trenwith - Ross is heading away to the war- Charles Poldark was not shown due to the sad passing of Warren C, the actor who played him. I enjoyed seeing the others though.


Smollett - I agree the flashback was enjoyable. Like you, I noticed the sad absence of Warren C. Amazing, though, to work through to the end of one's life and a great series to end with. This was the only addition that I felt worthwhile. Others, such as all the meetings with Elizabeth and not in the books, just wasted valuable time which was needed for scenes with Ross and Demelza and Drake and Morwenna.



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Date: Aug 5 6:13 AM, 2018
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Another quick thought re this ep- during the flashback sequence at Trenwith - Ross is heading away to the war- Charles Poldark was not shown due to the sad passing of Warren C, the actor who played him. I enjoyed seeing the others though.


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SMOLLETT


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Date: Aug 5 12:41 AM, 2018
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faith101 wrote:

I am kinda torn. This is the one thing I did not like about the Angry Tide: Killing off Elizabeth!


 Essential part of the story. If I recall correctly, Dwight never reveals what he knows and George clearly believes it was yet another premature birth (at last) and yet there's that ambiguous line (and I'm quoting from memory even though I saw it last night), "See what we have done to her" or somesuch. We, the readers/viewers, understand that her death is the result of all that has gone before. Plus, it sets the scene for the future lives of her children. Glorious bit of plotting by WG.



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Date: Aug 5 12:35 AM, 2018
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Well! What a fantastic series final! I had a few quibbles but that's to be expected. I quite liked the flashback although I did spend time wondering when it had been filmed. It served its purpose of reminding viewers of Elizabeth and Ross's past, and was a good lead-in to Elizabeth's visit to the quack. Scrub the dogs chasing Morwenna - so unnecessary. I puzzled about that headstone already being in place over a nicely settled grave by the time Morwenna and Drake's supposedly hastened wedding occurred but I'll put that down to poetic licence. Also, the true awfulness of Elizabeth's death was minimised. As I recall, when Ross visits, the room already stinks of gangrenous flesh. I've noticed here and there that a few viewers were perplexed about her death. Those daintily discoloured fingers barely hinted at the full horror.

 

Still, with it being an episode which contained my two favourite scenes from the books - Elizabeth's demise and when Morwenna finally comes to Drake - I was well pleased. Oh, and I liked the moon disappearing behind black clouds. That darned black moon! Roll on series 5!



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Date: Aug 2 6:45 AM, 2018
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I enjoyed it. I found it very moving. Fine acting all round.

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Date: Jul 31 4:58 PM, 2018
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I thought the opening flashback was unnecessary.  Perhaps it was an homage to the cast of 4 seasons, especially the ones who will not return.  I was looking forward to R and D's reunion but it was very underdone.  Missed the lines about their solution of continuing to live, learn and love.  Liked the scenes that were there but again wanted more.  Also the coach ride home with Ross and Caroline was very underdone.  And then to bring the drama in with dogs chasing Morwenna!  Some of the added dialogue regarding Elizabeth and Hugh hopefully did bring closure to those issues.  The whole series was readily available online last week through daily motion but I notice it's gone now.  Sometimes you just have to catch it at the right time and I was able to watch the 2 episodes I missed.  One of them had the voices distorted for some reason and what a difference.  I truly appreciate the acting and voices and emotion that all the actors have given to this series.  It was nice to end with the wedding, very positive.  All in all, a good finale.  It can never be as good as the books but every episode had its great moments.



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Date: Jul 31 6:45 AM, 2018
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I did like the tombstone touch. How long did it take to get Aunt Agatha's stone installed after it was ordered? I forget now. But when George Warleggan places an order, the stone cutters jump into action. Then again, Debbie Horsfield threw away the opportunity for an over-the-top memorial service to open Series 5 that way. 



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Date: Jul 30 1:56 PM, 2018
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I found the Drake and Morwenna aspects of this episode well presented and beautifully acted. Harry chasing Morwenna with dogs was unnecessary as it was already clear how traumatised she was over her encounter with George. Precious time could have been used at the very end and given us more of Ross and Demelza. 



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Date: Jul 30 12:19 PM, 2018
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It was entirely due to the potion she took. Thought to be Ergot which causes spasm of blood vessels. Its used today in a drug called ergometrine , a synthetic drug which helps to minimise blood loss after the birth of a baby. In ELizabeths case, it caused all the blood vessels in her lower limbs to constrict and therefore stop oxygen getting to the tissues so they became gangrenous.

 



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Date: Jul 30 12:14 PM, 2018
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I'm still left wondering if Elizabeth's death was caused entirely by the tonic ? Or had she been ill for some time? Could anyone shed some light on that for me?

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Date: Jul 30 9:23 AM, 2018
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I enjoyed this series more than the two previous ones where Demelza , in particular seemed to completely change character. I am glad they gave Elizabeth a sympathetic finale and highlighted her strong maternal feelings and instincts. This was Elizabeth's finest and sometimes only redeeming feature and im relieved that the production focussed on this.  

I was disappointed that the edgy controversial conversation between Caroline and Ross did not get dramatised, but they have chosen to portray Caroline as a bit of a shallow society dimwit at times and also Ross always has to be the hero, working it out for himself why he fought Adderley.

Elizabeths death was dreadfully sad, and though the production chose to sanitise the horror of it, i was moved by the ensemble acting.

I fear for series five, ive read some rumours and i dont like any of them!   



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Date: Jul 29 10:26 PM, 2018
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It was so much better than I expected, staying very close to the book. However, the flashbacks confused me and took away valuable time from much that was important in the final part of this book. Overall, though an emotional and brave finale to perhaps the best series so far. I would have liked a little more time for Ross and Demelza at the end.



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Date: Jul 29 10:14 PM, 2018
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I am kinda torn. This is the one thing I did not like about the Angry Tide: Killing off Elizabeth!

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Date: Jul 28 9:07 PM, 2018
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Poldark Series 4 Episode 8



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