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Post Info TOPIC: After the ball at Werry House


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Date: Mar 3 7:04 AM, 2018
RE: After the ball at Werry House
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I need to go back and read it all in context.



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Student

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Date: Mar 2 1:50 PM, 2018
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Similar to Dark Mare, I thought his 'thank you' was for her seeming to demurely accept his proposition. I didn't get the impression that she told him where her room was. (I don't know if there is any additional dialog in the Ward Lock ed.).  

 



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Date: Mar 2 6:29 AM, 2018
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Fijane wrote:

Why does McNeil say "Thank you, my sweet..." if she hasn't given him the information? I always read it that she had told him but that WG didn't include the dialogue. I thought that he was thanking her for the implied consent she was giving by telling him the room location.


 I thought the "thank you" was for not acting offended by his suggestion and for not telling him to stay away. 



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Date: Mar 1 8:43 PM, 2018
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Why does McNeil say "Thank you, my sweet..." if she hasn't given him the information? I always read it that she had told him but that WG didn't include the dialogue. I thought that he was thanking her for the implied consent she was giving by telling him the room location.



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Date: Dec 17 12:50 AM, 2017
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Hollyhock wrote:

Dark Mare,

In re-reading this section, it seems the world knew which room was hers. Sir Hugh had put her in the relatively unoccupied east wing by design. So he was indignant when he found that John Treneglos had gotten there ahead of him. Asked how he knew which room was hers, John said he'd gotten a maid to tell him. (I'm surprised Ruth didn't make him stay home with her.) Since Malcolm was a soldier, sounds like he put his reconnoitering skills to work. Or maybe he found an obliging maid too. He said that no one saw him enter her room but that doesn't mean he didn't ask where her room was.  BTW, that hall-way exchange between Sir Hugh and John is reminiscent of a vaudeville routine, or maybe one of Shakespeare's comedic interludes. Very funny. 

 


I just thought it was funny that even as she was bullying herself into going forward with her plan, she was withholding the key piece of information needed for the visit to occur. Demelza was more forthcoming in Debbie Horsfield's script, which added a sentence -- something like "I believe Sir Hugh called it the Red Room" -- to her line "I am not well-acquainted with this house." to give poor McNeil a chance of finding her without fear of stumbling into someone else's room first. 

I agree that Sir Hugh and John Treneglos were hilarious, but I enjoyed the scene as played out in the series equally because the actor who plays Tankard is good at putting on that slithery quality associated with Tartuffe.



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Sunday 17th of December 2017 12:51:36 AM



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Sunday 17th of December 2017 02:45:19 AM

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Student

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Date: Dec 16 4:07 PM, 2017
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Dark Mare,

In re-reading this section, it seems the world knew which room was hers. Sir Hugh had put her in the relatively unoccupied east wing by design. So he was indignant when he found that John Treneglos had gotten there ahead of him. Asked how he knew which room was hers, John said he'd gotten a maid to tell him. (I'm surprised Ruth didn't make him stay home with her.) Since Malcolm was a soldier, sounds like he put his reconnoitering skills to work. Or maybe he found an obliging maid too. He said that no one saw him enter her room but that doesn't mean he didn't ask where her room was.  BTW, that hall-way exchange between Sir Hugh and John is reminiscent of a vaudeville routine, or maybe one of Shakespeare's comedic interludes. Very funny. 

 



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Date: Dec 15 7:40 PM, 2017
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While rereading the section of "Warleggan" that deals with Sir Hugh's birthday party, I just noticed something: Demelza doesn't actually tell Captain McNeil which bedroom she is using. Or am I missing something? 

... But will you not fulfil the promise of your looks, my darling? Perhaps later. Later tonight. Which is your room? Demelza . . . 
 
Well, what was she waiting for? Was this not why she had come to the ball? Was this not the only way of getting back at Ross? Had she not a few hours ago been bitterly reflecting that no eligible man existed? Sir Hugh, in such a connection, filled her with repugnance. So did John Treneglos. But here was McNeil, off tomorrow, personable, quite attractive to her, eager and loving. What more could she ask? Unless the whole of her rebellion, the whole of her protest, was the empty breath of so many angry words, words spoken within herself and never seriously meant. A windbag, pretending to be daring. Bolstering herself up on glasses of wine so that she might reach the ultimate peak of wickedness by allowing someone to kiss her. How many casual carnal kisses had Ross given, not only to Elizabeth but to that bold coarse creature stalking about indoors? Margaret Vosper. Margaret Cartland, Margaret Poldark. Demelza Poldark. Demelza McNeil. 
She lowered her head and said in a low voice: I am not well acquainted with this house. 
I am. I have lived here many weeks. His lips touched her ear, his hand on her arm. Thank you, my sweet, thank you . . .
 
 
 
When she got to her room much later that night, the conductors coattails were still swinging. A few of the energetic younger couples were making the most of the emptying floor, but the majority of the guests had departed or were beginning the process of retiring for the night. ...

How did "I am not well acquainted with this house." steer McNeil to the right door?


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