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Post Info TOPIC: Ward Lock Book 4 - Warleggan


Student

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Date: Nov 4 4:55 PM, 2019
RE: Ward Lock Book 4 - Warleggan
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Thanks.  Even as I wrote that I thought there was mention of it before but hadn't noted it.  As for unabiding, I think it should be abiding and yet unabiding just sounds better.  The more I hear the new titles of the books the more I like them - really connects the four books as one story.  But then they're also quite American sounding.



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Date: Nov 4 8:16 AM, 2019
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Re the use of "renegade": from Ross Poldark, Book 2, Chapter 6:

"Quite the sentimental fool, egad. Quite the renegade. Mixing with the Indians and fighting against the whites. Traitor to one's own station in life ..."

The passage makes Doubleday's re-titling choice a little more explicable.



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Date: Nov 4 4:34 AM, 2019
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I have just finished reading and comparing the Ward Lock Warleggan with the Pan Books edition and I agree with Mrs. Gimlett about all it has to offer.  I have now compared the 4 Ward Lock books word for word and I'm very happy that all the rest of the books were not revised.  I feel very close to all 4 books now.

The timing of Warleggan is interesting in that by the time it was published in 1953, Ross Poldark (as The Renegade) and Demelza would have been revised already for the Doubleday publication.  So it was only two years old when the new publication came out in 1955.  I wonder how many original WL copies were made.  I had to wait until far into the book to find the largest omission of 1-1/2 paragraphs on page 324.  It was about Dwight in Plymouth telling of the terror of the press gangs and even Dwight had to be careful and also meeting his medical assistant who knew no medicine.  Not vital to the story but so nice to read the extra bits you get in WL.  Again, it's all about the change and omission of a few words most of which don't seem necessary.  There are some corrections which is nice, i.e., Sister-in-law is changed to Cousin-in-law when talking about Elizabeth's relationship to Ross.  This is done 5 times though so I don't think WG considered it a mistake in the first place.  Would he have "corrected" it or was it the work of an extremely meticulous editor.  The book was gone through very thoroughly as sometimes after many pages of no changes at all, there would be just one added or omitted word.

Despite a chance to correct and improve the text, in the end the Pan Books version is full of strange word changes that are just wrong.  The new word does not make sense in the sentence and it seems like a type-setter just guessed at a word something like today when your tablet suggests a word for you and you pick the first one you see.  For example:  little becomes lithe, conventional becomes conversational, leisure becomes tenure, conflict becomes convict and value becomes salve.  I just mention it because there were so many of them.  Can't even call them typos.  This could be just in the Pan version and not in the original Doubleday version.  Warleggan was called "The Last Gamble" in America and I think must be very rare with that title as I couldn't find any online for sale.

Some lines I wish had stayed in as they convey extra emotion:

"moved by the last words she had said."  - Demelza had just said "I love you so much" in the garter/stocking scene.

"Demelza waited, her face clear, alert, expectant.  And he waited, loving her like that".  This is when Ross was telling her about his time in London and of bringing Caroline and Dwight together.

"We can't go back but we can go on".  Nearly at the end of their reconciliation.

More trivia:  WG describes Ross as a renegade in Warleggan - I don't think he'd used that word in the other books.  But he calls him an "unabiding renegade" which means NOT enduring, NOT lasting.  I'm trying to figure out what exactly is meant.

 

 

 

 



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Date: Aug 29 10:52 AM, 2017
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Having begun all the books again some weeks ago, I have recently finished Warleggan.

I believe at one time I preferred the first 3 books, but have come to realise how much this one has to offer.  It is a real roller-coaster containing love, betrayal, faithfulness, unfaithfulness, tenderness, friendship, anger, jealousy, greed, longing, loathing and many other traits and emotions.

We come to know Caroline's true character - how misunderstood she is by the casual acquaintance.  The last months of Francis' life and the consequences of his death.  George features heavily and we learn of his malice, jealousy and surprisingly, a slightly more human side of him too.  The informer story is woven into the fabric of village life beautifully, ending with that night when Ross is so nearly caught up again in 'the trade' and Dwight's involvement resulting in he and Caroline going their separate ways.  Each event is believable, especially the morning after 9th May, when Demelza is depicted as distraught, not knowing what to do. Ross is in like state, but cannot work out his true feelings for a long time.  That period afterwards when both Ross and Demelza are so miserable but don't know how to resolve their differences is absolutely true to life.  We learn how similar R&D actually are.  They are each fiercely loyal, have oodles of self-doubt and at the same time are proud individuals.  Neither can articulate their feelings in a way that satisfies them.

I love the story of Caroline's generosity and the way it's written.  WG had the wonderful ability to put himself into a female mind and really understand how women behave and react to things in ways that are different from men.

There is so much in this volume that gives first time readers no idea how it will end.  The ending, of course is absolutely tear-jerking - surely no-one can read those final pages dry-eyed.

How strange that, having written four wonderful books, culminating in Warleggan and creating such a brilliant finale, we had to wait 20 years for WG to put pen to Poldark paper again.  Thank goodness he at last thought to discover for himself what happened to R&D after Christmas Eve 1793.



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Date: Aug 8 8:57 PM, 2017
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