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Post Info TOPIC: The Angry Tide - ending


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Date: Sep 19 10:31 PM, 2018
RE: The Angry Tide - ending
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Dave well done.  I am sure you will be well rewarded by reading the next five books.

The chimney corner refers to people getting old and sitting by the fire all day doing not a lot.  Something you will never catch Demelza doing!

Her health is not bad, she just gets the odd migraine.  I think this is WGs way of expressing the beginning of her menopausal phase.  

You have so much to look forward to and soon you will find a really lovely episode which I am not going to spoil for you.

Keep reading and enjoy.

Mrs G



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Well, Mrs. G, I took you plea and concern to heart and ordered Stranger the other day. I have read the first few chapters and like it very much. I love history, its events, and people so WG is combining two things I love history and the Poldark saga. 

I like the backfill of the story to relate to the 10-year gap between the books. The feelings and emotions of Geoffrey Charles and George after Elizabeth's death were wonderful stories and great reading. WG almost makes G.W. a sympathetic character. 

I was somewhat disconcerting to leave one scene and then jump to another or ahead in time, but that is WG's way. For instance, he goes from the start of the battle in Portugal and then jumps to Cornwall. Also, he mentions some characters that appear without any explanation, i.e.  Isabella, Sophie. I am sure in WG's way he will weave this information on them and other events into the story later. 

Many questions already. Needing 8 field hands for haymaking? Did Ross expand his land holdings or clear more land for agriculture use? 

Another I am sorry to hear about Demelza's health problems. Also her comment on turning forty years old. 

As for Demelza herself, her approximate fortieth birthday had just come and gone, and she was trying, so far with some success, to keep her mind off the chimney corner.

The Stranger From The Sea (p. 45).  Kindle Edition. 

Chimney corner, should this be taken literally or is it some Cornish expression about old age? 

Again thanks for the encouragement to continue with reading the Saga. 



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Dave, I urge you to open The Stranger From The Sea as soon as you possibly can.  It is true that the next tranche of books is about the Poldark children, but they still all pivot about Ross and Demelza.  Their relationship is still tested, but in different ways and the storylines are just as absorbing. There is much more besides the doings of the young of Nampara.  WG writes in his usual meticulously researched way.  All kinds of things come into the books.

You must know some of what happens, but I can assure you that any negative things you've heard will be cancelled out by the detail and all the familiar names which continue until the very end of the series.  One of my favourite things is following how Clowance develops - I am sure you will get quickly drawn in.

I wonder if you have read the posts about the later books, Dave?  I hope not, because then you can read the books fresh.  You are in for a treat - please indulge yourself.

 



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Stella posted:

Dave - I understand your reluctance to read on beyond The Angry Tide. Many people say the later books are all about the children. I have not found this to be true although some of it is, of course, Ross and Demelza in the context of their children. As children grow up the parents change too I think. Ross and Demelza's marriage is still very much part of the later books and they still have many challenges to face. You may find that what you fear is not there at all and it is very interesting to discover how Ross and Demelza parent their children and the relationships they have with each of them.  There are still threads which involve George and his family. I hope you will develop some curiosity for the later books as I think you may find them worth reading.

Hollyhock posted:

Dave-I agree with Stella. Having come so far you should commit to completing the saga. The next book, Stranger from the Sea, may be the least compelling but it has its moments. Since you love the romance between R&D their interactions alone make the book worth reading.  You will also meet the precocious Miss Bella and, later in the saga, the adorable Henry and the incomparable Butto. You will not be disappointed.

 

Someone a Latin poet had defined eternity as no more than this: to hold and possess the whole fullness of life in one moment, there and then, past and present and to come.

 He thought, If we could only stop life for a while I would stop here.

 Ross Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1783-1787  (p. 376).  Kindle Edition.

Ross explains my thoughts about stopping here at the end of TAT. To me, it seems WG brought the Demelza and Ross's relationship to a satisfying ending.  I have the feeling that after completing this novel WG felt he had all he had to say about  Demelza and Ross, he ran out of creative juices and maybe wanted to start something different.

Now four years later he begins to write again and jumped 10 years in the Saga which gives me further proof he needed a different tack to continue on.

However, I  feel  I don't want to hear all the drama with their children, most of it bad from what I have gathered. Maybe someday I will change my mind. Right now I am happy that Ross and Demelza have reconciled and have come together with a stronger understanding and caring for each other.

The past is over, gone. What is to come doesnt exist yet. Thats tomorrow! Its only now that can ever be, at any one moment. And at this moment, now, we are alive and together. We cant ask more. There isnt any more to ask.

 The Angry Tide: A Novel of Cornwall 1798-1799  (p. 612).  Kindle Edition.

This is Demelza speaking at the end of TAT.   I  should take these smart gals,  Demelza thoughts along with  Stella and Hollyhock's advice,  and continue on with the Saga.  I believe I will, not now but someday. Romance you write Hollyhock, do you mean Demelza and Ross argue, quarrel and then kiss and make love. I am all for that.

 

 



-- Edited by Dave on Saturday 15th of September 2018 03:44:34 PM

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Mrs. G. I feel the same about pregnant women and families like your husband. 



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Topic transferred....

https://poldark.activeboard.com/t64872251/ross-and-demelzas-children-why-only-5/



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Dave wrote:

Hi, we seem to be getting off Topic here. I don't know how or if I am permitted to move this discussion to a new topic heading for this discussion.  I know I have more to contribute to this topic on their children, why only 5?

How about this for a title.  Ross and Demelza's children, why only 5?

 



-- Edited by Dave on Wednesday 15th of August 2018 05:27:43 PM


 Dave - Ross and Demelza were apart for long periods throughout their marriage which may be partly an answer to your question. I suggest you start a new topic if you want to extend this discussion.



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Hi, we seem to be getting off Topic here. I don't know how or if I am permitted to move this discussion to a new topic heading for this discussion.  I know I have more to contribute to this topic on their children, why only 5?

How about this for a title.  Ross and Demelza's children, why only 5?

 



-- Edited by Dave on Wednesday 15th of August 2018 05:27:43 PM

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Yes, Dark Mare, I see your point. Here is Dwight's take on what we are discussing. He says this after his own daughter illness is diagnosed. 

Dwight narrowed his eyes and stared at the colourless day. When one sees, as I do, hundreds of children brought into the world in poverty and squalor and deprivation, many of them attended by some clumsy midwife who mishandles the mother, bites the cord with her teeth and gives the child a drop of gin to keep it quiet, and they all, or almost all, in the first place, in the first months of life, whatever happens later, they almost all are perfect in every way, it is very strange to contemplate the paradox of a rich child, attended by her own father and brought up with all the care and attention of a princess, that such a child should be flawed, and flawed in a way that it is beyond the skill of man to cure.

 

Graham, Winston. The Angry Tide: A Novel of Cornwall 1798-1799 (Poldark Book 7) (p. 91). Pan Macmillan. Kindle Edition.



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Dave wrote:

... I believe that Ross does not think about the chances of Demelza getting pregnant when they make love. Demelza once said in one of the books Ross doesn't think like that about many things, doesn't always think of the consequences of his action, maybe getting Demelza pregnant is one of those things.  The Poldark's lineage, as Dark Mare points out,  is not one that is prone by genetics for procreation ( low sperm count (?) , although that night he spent with Elizabeth.....hhhmmm). Nobody in his family had many children. Demelza's lineage on the other hand is quite different.  Also, Ross was away many times, so the opportunities were not there. This I am sure led to Demelza's frustration and loneliness in regards to Ross.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 Or Elizabeth, clearly. It does make one wonder, considering Ross' father's reputation as a libertine. One would expect Ross to have been well-educated on this subject by his father. Joshua was the bane of Cornish husbands' existence for years after Grace died, but there wasn't one -- child of his out there as far as he knew -- or was it Ross who spoke of it?. (Maybe low sperm count explained Joshua's dearth of illegitimate issue.)

As for Poldark family sizes, the problem seems to be premature death of either the mother or father and infant illness rather than any fertility issue. Ross' mother died at 30, having had two children. Francis and Verity's mother died at 33, having had five children, three of whom died very young. Francis, who died at age 32, fathered only one of Elizabeth's three children. (Of course there was a period of very chilly relations between Francis and Elizabeth after Geoffrey Charles was born that made subsequent children less likely.) Ross and Demelza, who married when he was 27 and she was 17, had five children, one of whom died at 15 months. Their children were well spaced out thanks to periods of aloofness on Ross' part when he was overwhelmed by their financial problems and/or enthralled with Elizabeth and after he entered Parliament. Verity married late and had her only child at age 35, but she also had two teen-age stepchildren. (Ross and Francis' other cousin, the Rev. William Alfred Johns, and his wife supposedly were very prolific [WG just wrote "many children" under their names in the family tree.].)

Demelza's family stopped growing when her mother died, and started again when Nellie produced three more, only one of whom, a daughter, survived childhood. Among those children who died was the son Tom Carne had boasted about being bigger and more robust at birth than Julia during the party after Julia's christening. Sad irony: Both of those cousins died very young.

Dave, I think maybe you have missed my point. Demelza was confident about having children because she and her siblings had grown up healthy despite being born into poverty and squalor. Ross was pessimistic presumably because Julia was not the first child in his life to die young. He had lost a brother and three cousins young when he was a boy. Demelza was unafraid because her children were getting a better start in life than she and her brothers had gotten. Ross was afraid because Julia and Jeremy were not given as good a start in life as he, Francis and their brothers had had. Had Demelza been living with her family when her father's second family was being born and then dying, she might have had a more nuanced point of view.

 



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Wednesday 15th of August 2018 12:11:21 PM

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Yes I agree.



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I agree it was well adapted.  I only miss the word "welcomed" from the book when Ross says "but a prospect is not a child, and a child can be welcomed for all that."



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Glad you liked it. As a father myself that scene always touched me. Like I had written I think it is one of the few times the film outdid the scene in the book. I frequently go back and view previous seasons, I am looking again at season 1. Of course, I am always reading the books, by whole or sections of them. I am glad the link worked for you. 

I am wondering if I should start this as a new topic since I am getting off the original topic. Will see how many responses to this topic regarding children gets. 



-- Edited by Dave on Saturday 11th of August 2018 12:31:36 PM



-- Edited by Dave on Saturday 11th of August 2018 12:32:50 PM

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I loved watching that youtube clip. It was so refreshing to see a scene played out in full with the right amount of dialogue. Just highlighted what I have been missing this season.

You have whetted my appetite to go back and watch the first season again.



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This is in reply to Dark Mare about Ross and Demelza having children. I have a different view on this situation.

Well, I thought you could distinguish between a theoretical case and a practical one. Evidently that isnt so. I wasnt well educated No more was I. Look. He thumped the flat of his hand on the mantelpiece. Look. If you ask me, do I want more children, Ill say no. Were nearly paupers, the worlds awry, and weve lost Julia. Correct? Thats a theoretical case. But if you say youre having another child, do I dislike the prospectId say yes, for all these reasons I still dislike the prospectbut a prospect is not a child, and a child can be welcomed for all that. Dyou understand what I mean? No, she said.

Jeremy Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1790-1791 (The Poldark Saga Book 3) (p. 224).

This Ross's argument on accepting the news of Demelza pregnancy.  I feel he gave a very good pro-life argument here.  Abortion issue here in the United States will continue to be a contentious problem in my mind due to the fact the fathers of these babies are never thought about or brought into the discussion of abortion. Ross does a very good job presenting a "the father of the child " view on a pregnancy.

I believe that Ross does not think about the chances of Demelza getting pregnant when they make love. Demelza once said in one of the books Ross doesn't think like that about many things, doesn't always think of the consequences of his action, maybe getting Demelza pregnant is one of those things.  The Poldark's lineage, as Dark Mare points out,  is not one that is prone by genetics for procreation ( low sperm count (?) , although that night he spent with Elizabeth.....hhhmmm). Nobody in his family had many children. Demelza's lineage on the other hand is quite different.  Also, Ross was away many times, so the opportunities were not there. This I am sure led to Demelza's frustration and loneliness in regards to Ross.

She said, By April I shall look like Mr. Trencrom. It was the first time they had laughed together for a long time, but her laughter was still dangerously near tears, his a not quite voluntary surrender of his irritation.

 Jeremy Poldark: A Novel of Cornwall, 1790-1791 (The Poldark Saga Book 3) (p. 226).

 

 

I think this scene in the movie was superior to the book. I have attached the file, hope it works https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Demelza+tells+ross+she+is+pregnant+You+Tube&view=detail&mid=544FE47FA8C7B6FC9DFB544FE47FA8C7B6FC9DFB&FORM=VIRE

 

(to be continued: I have much more to write)



-- Edited by Dave on Friday 10th of August 2018 11:16:48 PM

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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

Do you think that apart from from the genuine shock and worry for Ross over Elizabeth's death, that some part of Demelza must have been feeling very relieved?  Surely she would not be human if she didn't have thoughts about her 'rival' finally being unable to come between her and Ross, however deeply she would have suppressed them. 

What a pity WG didn't write another book covering the period immediately after the events of that winter in 1799.  It could have covered so many topics - where did Geoffrey Charles spend Christmas that year for instance? We know nothing about what happened to him until many years later.  Demelza cajoling Ross out of his depressed mood.  The children growing up. (I have often wondered why Ross and Demelza only had 5 children).  I would have liked to know more about the time of Bella's birth too. What do others think?


 

Actually, after the way Ross reacted in the whole Armitage/Adderley business, I'm not sure Demelza would have felt at all relieved by Elizabeth's death. Now her rival would be both an ideal and a ghost. (I have always thought Demelza had a second reason for going to Trenwith to help when the family was ill with putrid throat: A fear that if Elizabeth died, Ross would never get over it -- especially because they were at odds at the time -- and her death would cast a permanent shadow over their marriage.) 

I think she must have felt more certain of Ross' love than she had before when he said Elizabeth's death made him realize that she, too, would die some day, leaving him alone. (But how was she able to take that statement with a straight face? Given his habit of risking his life and the fact that he is 10 years her senior, she long ago had to have come to terms with the fact that she likely would outlive him and by many years.) 

Where did Geoffrey Charles spend Christmas? Good question. After his comment about Valentine looking just like Ross, Christmas with George was out of the question. There is no way a Christmas visit to Nampara would have been permitted. If he had been with Verity in Falmouth, Elizabeth's mother would have insisted that he be sent for once Elizabeth's health started to deteriorate. That didn't happen so he must not have been at Verity's. 

It would be just like George to seek a way to punish the boy for what he said, which opens up two other possibilities: 

1.) He was made to spend Christmas at Harrow with all the "holiday orphans," classmates whose homes were so far away that travel home and back would take longer than the school holiday lasted. 

2.) One of the families that had invited the boy to visit on past school holidays was prevailed upon to take him in again. 

I would guess No. 1 is the likelier possibility -- unless one of the families was related to the Godolphins. 

As for the number of children the Poldarks had, I suspect that Ross' anxiety over childbirth and children dying young had a lot to do with it. The first time I read the books, I thought his hand wringing and crepe hanging every time Demelza was pregnant after Julia's death had to be a bit unnerving for her, but then I took a good look at the Poldark family tree. We know both his mother and his aunt died young, but the family tree also reveals that while seven Poldark children were born in Ross' generation -- five at Trenwith and two at Nampara -- only three survived to adulthood.  Demelza had confidence in happy outcomes because all seven children in her family survived to adulthood despite having grown up with the odds heavily stacked against them. (One brother did die as a young adult, but he survived their impoverished childhood.)  
 
I think Demelza would have been happy with a houseful of children close enough in age to be playmates for one another, but she had to have realized when Jeremy was little that Ross' heart wasn't in parenthood. Yes, he loved his children, but their existence was not a sufficient consideration to keep him from repeatedly risking his life. Rescuing Dwight was justifiable, of course, but the duel with Adderley was not. Did he give the possibility of his children losing their father even one moment's thought? I doubt it. 


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Dave-I agree with Stella. Having come so far you should commit to completing the saga. The next book, Stranger from the Sea, may be the least compelling but it has its moments. Since you love the romance between R&D their interactions alone make the book worth reading.  You will also meet the precocious Miss Bella and, later in the saga, the adorable Henry and the incomparable Butto. You will not be disappointed.



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Dave wrote:

Just finished reading again The Angry Tide. I like very much the ending of this book. I also believe WG wrote it to be the culmination of the great story of a marriage between two very fascinating people. Demelza wasn't home when Ross arrived from London, so their initial greeting was not a passionate one but one overshadowed by Drake's wedding. This was brilliant because it set up the dialogue later with Ross and Demelza under Demelza's favorite place at Hendrawna beach. Their talk about favors to each other really touched me. Later after Ross came home from Elizabeth's deathbed at Trenwith, they settled at their favorite place at Nampara for talking, the chairs in front of the fire. Their dialogue there really revealed to me again about their ability to talk about their feelings with and to each other. Ross and Demelza always had that ability to be honest with each other's feelings, right from the first book, when Ross first asked Demelza to supp with him. In this scene by the fire, they revealed their feelings openly and tried to have a rational conversation about those feelings. To me, it shows that though Ross is deeply depressed he realized that it will not last, especially with Demelza by his side. That is what he fears the most, that she won't be always there. It is I believe a start to his maturation about life, especially in regards to his wife Demelza.

 

I fear to go with this Saga as I have peeked at the other books and I think Ross and Demelza, Demelza especially, will be just collateral characters in the rest of the books.

-- Edited by Dave on Tuesday 31st of July 2018 01:37:11 PM


 Dave - I understand your reluctance to read on beyond The Angry Tide. Many people say the later books are all about the children. I have not found this to be true although some of it is, of course, Ross and Demelza in the context of their children. As children grow up the parents change too I think. Ross and Demelza's marriage is still very much part of the later books and they still have many challenges to face. You may find that what you fear is not there at all and it is very interesting to discover how Ross and Demelza parent their children and the relationships they have with each of them.  There are still threads which involve George and his family. I hope you will develop some curiosity for the later books as I think you may find them worth reading.



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Just finished reading again The Angry Tide. I like very much the ending of this book. I also believe WG wrote it to be the culmination of the great story of a marriage between two very fascinating people. Demelza wasn't home when Ross arrived from London, so their initial greeting was not a passionate one but one overshadowed by Drake's wedding. This was brilliant because it set up the dialogue later with Ross and Demelza under Demelza's favorite place at Hendrawna beach. Their talk about favors to each other really touched me. Later after Ross came home from Elizabeth's deathbed at Trenwith, they settled at their favorite place at Nampara for talking, the chairs in front of the fire. Their dialogue there really revealed to me again about their ability to talk about their feelings with and to each other. Ross and Demelza always had that ability to be honest with each other's feelings, right from the first book, when Ross first asked Demelza to supp with him. In this scene by the fire, they revealed their feelings openly and tried to have a rational conversation about those feelings. To me, it shows that though Ross is deeply depressed he realized that it will not last, especially with Demelza by his side. That is what he fears the most, that she won't be always there. It is I believe a start to his maturation about life, especially in regards to his wife Demelza.

 

I fear to go on with this Saga as I have peeked at the other books and I think Ross and Demelza, Demelza especially, will be just collateral characters in the rest of the books.



-- Edited by Dave on Tuesday 31st of July 2018 01:37:11 PM



-- Edited by Dave on Wednesday 1st of August 2018 01:47:07 AM

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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I guess that the fast forwarding ten years was a good way of being able to introduce the next generation's romances more quickly.  Though, by the time he wrote Stranger from the Sea he would have known there was a loyal army of fans who wanted to know every single thing about the lives of all those characters.

Perhaps Demelza did dose herself with port during childbirth, but I think I have heard that women also used some raspberry infusion too.  Char would probably be able to tell us more about it.  Strange how she always hated her thickening figure, but Ross was not the least bothered by it. 

My husband used to think seeing a pregnant woman was a lovely thing; an optimistic sign for the future.


 I got the impression that during those times, people didn't think there was anything improper about a woman drinking during pregnancy, apparently they didn't know of the dangers.



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I guess that the fast forwarding ten years was a good way of being able to introduce the next generation's romances more quickly.  Though, by the time he wrote Stranger from the Sea he would have known there was a loyal army of fans who wanted to know every single thing about the lives of all those characters.

Perhaps Demelza did dose herself with port during childbirth, but I think I have heard that women also used some raspberry infusion too.  Char would probably be able to tell us more about it.  Strange how she always hated her thickening figure, but Ross was not the least bothered by it. 

My husband used to think seeing a pregnant woman was a lovely thing; an optimistic sign for the future.



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Namparagirl wrote:

Somehow it seems strange the way WG decided to leave a gap of 10 years in the lives of his Poldark folk, it's the only time he did this.  Strange also that Bella's birth is the only one not documented and I think I've posted before where I said I hoped that this period was a happy, calm and relaxed period of stability for the family, but I agree, there are many things left untold.  I wonder if Geoffrey Charles would have spent time with his Aunt Verity after his mother's death as I am sure she would have been the perfect choice to have been able to comfort, love and support him during this very sensitive time as she was the nearest to a mother figure there would have been and they did have a close bond in his early years.  I wonder whether George would have been callous and hard-hearted enough to have prevented Verity from helping GC through his grief.

Somehow, I like to think that Demelza would have been a tower of strength to Ross in his sadness; true she may not have grieved so much but she would have felt genuine sadness at the situation and not stooped to feeling relief that Elizabeth had died.  Just don't think that this would be our Demelza's way.

About the fact that they only had 5 children, I agree Mrs G, it does seem a little strange as we know they were a very physically passionate couple and in those days before birth control it was common for married couples of every class to have many more children.  Maybe it was something to do with the fact that Ross was so often away in London. (Mind you, hats off to Demelza for having 5 children in those days before even the old gas & air, wonder if she dosed up with a liberal helping of port to fortify herself ... Judas! those Georgian woman were brave souls!)



-- Edited by Namparagirl on Friday 4th of May 2012 11:22:29 PM


 True, but then there were friends of the Poldarks who also had small families, the Enyses had three, The Carters two or three, I don't recall, Morwenna had two, Verity and Adrews just one.  It's possibly true that if Ross had not been away so much the Poldarks would have had more children.  In my own opinion, though, the five that they had were just enough to keep track of and to develop their characters sufficiently.



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Somehow it seems strange the way WG decided to leave a gap of 10 years in the lives of his Poldark folk, it's the only time he did this.  Strange also that Bella's birth is the only one not documented and I think I've posted before where I said I hoped that this period was a happy, calm and relaxed period of stability for the family, but I agree, there are many things left untold.  I wonder if Geoffrey Charles would have spent time with his Aunt Verity after his mother's death as I am sure she would have been the perfect choice to have been able to comfort, love and support him during this very sensitive time as she was the nearest to a mother figure there would have been and they did have a close bond in his early years.  I wonder whether George would have been callous and hard-hearted enough to have prevented Verity from helping GC through his grief.

Somehow, I like to think that Demelza would have been a tower of strength to Ross in his sadness; true she may not have grieved so much but she would have felt genuine sadness at the situation and not stooped to feeling relief that Elizabeth had died.  Just don't think that this would be our Demelza's way.

About the fact that they only had 5 children, I agree Mrs G, it does seem a little strange as we know they were a very physically passionate couple and in those days before birth control it was common for married couples of every class to have many more children.  Maybe it was something to do with the fact that Ross was so often away in London. (Mind you, hats off to Demelza for having 5 children in those days before even the old gas & air, wonder if she dosed up with a liberal helping of port to fortify herself ... Judas! those Georgian woman were brave souls!)



-- Edited by Namparagirl on Friday 4th of May 2012 11:22:29 PM

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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

Do you think that apart from from the genuine shock and worry for Ross over Elizabeth's death, that some part of Demelza must have been feeling very relieved?  Surely she would not be human if she didn't have thoughts about her 'rival' finally being unable to come between her and Ross, however deeply she would have suppressed them. 

What a pity WG didn't write another book covering the period immediately after the events of that winter in 1799.  It could have covered so many topics - where did Geoffrey Charles spend Christmas that year for instance? We know nothing about what happened to him until many years later.  Demelza cajoling Ross out of his depressed mood.  The children growing up. (I have often wondered why Ross and Demelza only had 5 children).  I would have liked to know more about the time of Bella's birth too. What do others think?


 Possibly so, but I think even though Demelza say Elizabeth as a rival, she also cared very much about Geffery Charles, so would have felt very sad for him over his mother's death.

 

I wonder why you think it's strange that Ross and Demelza "only" had 5 children?  Do you think it was customary at that time to have more?  



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Date: May 4 12:42 PM, 2012
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Do you think that apart from from the genuine shock and worry for Ross over Elizabeth's death, that some part of Demelza must have been feeling very relieved?  Surely she would not be human if she didn't have thoughts about her 'rival' finally being unable to come between her and Ross, however deeply she would have suppressed them. 

What a pity WG didn't write another book covering the period immediately after the events of that winter in 1799.  It could have covered so many topics - where did Geoffrey Charles spend Christmas that year for instance? We know nothing about what happened to him until many years later.  Demelza cajoling Ross out of his depressed mood.  The children growing up. (I have often wondered why Ross and Demelza only had 5 children).  I would have liked to know more about the time of Bella's birth too. What do others think?



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