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Post Info TOPIC: Bella Poldark


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Date: May 9 11:48 PM, 2019
RE: Bella Poldark
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Hollyhock wrote:

It's interesting, the different interpretations that readers have about what characters say (like in real life I guess). Apparently, the exchange between Ross and Bella is just such a case. My impression is that when Ross saw the dynamic between Maurice and Bella in Rouen, he sensed that the relationship was sexual. Later, on shipboard, when he asked her that question, Bella's reaction was unwarranted for a question just about her feelings. Earlier, when Clowance was asked about her feelings for her two suitors, her reaction was totally different. Bella felt: how could a daughter dare to have a conversation with her father about her sex life! Thus her indignant response at being caught out: 'Papa, you are impossible!...To ask me such questions!' His asking her if she was likely to have a child cliched it for me.

 


 

I completely agree with you about Ross getting a sense early on about what was going on between Bella and Maurice. I also agree that when he asked how far she was committed to either of her suitors, he was most likely being intentionally ambiguous.

 
Where I think we differ is the interpretation of what happened next. My view is that Bella answered that question on the extent of her commitment in an innocent sense (i.e. she was talking about love, not sex). Ross took it as an opening, and followed up with 'Are you likely to have a child?' - to which she gave him a matter-of-fact answer before realising she did not really mean to - and that's when her indignant reaction kicked in. 
 
You are right that this reaction would not be warranted if the conversation was about feelings only. But I think it was precisely because Bella initially saw it as such that she missed the moment when when the topic had changed and found herself telling Ross more than she intended. If she understood all along they were talking about sex, why would she tell Ross he surprised her by asking such a question?
 
Also, while I'm sure Bella must have cursed herself for not keeping her mouth shut at the right moment, I don't believe her indignation was directed at herself for daring to speak to Ross about her sex life. It was directed at Ross for daring to ask about it, and she told him so: 'You - have no right!'
 
***
 
There is, however, a weak point in my interpretation - and I wonder if anyone else's view could help bridge that gap. I was in fact quite disappointed with Bella for being so late in realising she had said more than she wanted to in that scene - especially since WG writes that there was a long pause before she gave Ross her answer. If it took her so long to come up with a response - what was she thinking during all that time, and how come none of it raised a red flag?! And since eventually she reacted with so much indignation - how come she felt none of it before she gave the answer?!

 



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Date: May 9 2:23 PM, 2019
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Thanks for sharing your take on this Blackleburr, especially for pointing out a nuance that hadn't occurred to me. Yes, Bella was hurt that Christopher had a secret life, but she was also offended that he went to Mme Cono's instead of turning to her. That Christopher was trying to be honorable didn't ameliorate the offense. This does fit Bella's character and helps explain her actions with Maurice. (Love these subtleties in the stories.)

It's interesting, the different interpretations that readers have about what characters say (like in real life I guess). Apparently, the exchange between Ross and Bella is just such a case. My impression is that when Ross saw the dynamic between Maurice and Bella in Rouen, he sensed that the relationship was sexual. Later, on shipboard, when he asked her that question, Bella's reaction was unwarranted for a question just about her feelings. Earlier, when Clowance was asked about her feelings for her two suitors, her reaction was totally different. Bella felt: how could a daughter dare to have a conversation with her father about her sex life! Thus her indignant response at being caught out: 'Papa, you are impossible!...To ask me such questions!' His asking her if she was likely to have a child cliched it for me.

I agree that Christopher's relationship with Bella was probably just as he described it to Demelza. Even so, it was a bit surprising that her parents allowed her to travel back and forth between Cornwall and London with only Chris as a companion. Speculations about who slept where in those inns along the way are unavoidable.smile

When Christopher first met Bella I was truly worried. He was so enchanted with the 13-year-old that I was afraid he would turn out to be a creepy stalker (like someone else we know). I mean, he was always popping up unexpectedly and saying, hey little girl I have some sweets for you, or words to that effect. To add to my anxiety, Demelza's parenting seemed lackadaisical during that whole episode. Regardless, he always acted honorably where Bella was concerned, and was content to wait for her to grow up. Even though Maurice might have been enamored of Bella, I believe he mainly wanted to use her talents to further his own career. Christopher wanted nothing from her, not even her virtue; he just wanted her to be happy and fulfilled.

 



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Date: May 8 12:47 AM, 2019
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Interesting question, Hollyhock. It never crossed my mind before that Bella was admitting to having had sex when she told Ross she was "committed to both" Christopher and Maurice - my thinking was that she just meant she felt in love with both of them. But you're right that there may be more to read into her answer, and it seems that Ross did not take it at its face value either (at least as far as Maurice was concerned)... otherwise, why would his next question be if Bella was likely to have a child?

 
All in all, however, I believe the night Bella spent with Maurice was her first time ever and Christopher was telling the truth when he described his relationship with Bella as "relatively chaste" in that conversation with Demelza you mentioned. (Btw, how he managed to say that to his fiancee's mother, I can't begin to understand ) I suppose he meant "relatively chaste" in comparison to what he did with that Portugese mistress he used to have or those club women about whom he quarrelled with Bella (all of which he also - wonder of wonders - explained to Demelza!), which I take as a hint that he did not sleep with Bella after all.
 
Bella's reaction when she discovered Christopher's secret life at Mme Cono's also shows that their relationship did not involve sex, I think - she never asked him "what is it that these other women have and I don't?", because she knew very well what it was that she had not given him yet. The fact that she ran away with Maurice on the rebound could even indicate that what Bella was most indignant about in this whole situation was not Christopher casually going elsewhere to get what he did not get from her, but him not asking her to give it in the first place. This would be quite like Bella, I imagine.


-- Edited by Blackleburr on Wednesday 8th of May 2019 12:52:15 AM

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Date: May 3 3:11 PM, 2019
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Dear experts: I have a nagging question.

After Bella runs off to Rouen (ruin?) with Maurice Valery, they have a torrid interlude. When Ross comes to escort her back to London, they discuss her feelings for Maurice and Christopher. Ross asks her:

'Are you - committed to them in more than affection and the goodnight kiss?'

She answers frankly, 'To both for more than that! I am not made of stone, Papa!' (p.326)

The implication seems to be that she had slept with Christopher as well as Maurice. However, a short time later, Christopher seems to contradict this. When Bella is recovering from the 'morbid sore throat,' he visits her. Demelza questions him about the cause of Bella's estrangement from him and Christopher admits he has been indiscreet with someone else. But of Bella he says:

'I was her "sweetheart" in the romantic nature of the word. I kissed her frequently, encouraged her when, as rarely I admit, she became discouraged. But I never took advantage of her eager, romantic, loving personality to be more than a model suitor.' (p372)

So, is this one of WG's famous discrepancies? Or, is Christopher telling a gentlemanly lie to his fiancé's mom (I don't think so)? Or, is Bella being intentionally ambiguous?

Maybe this is one for Sherlock Holmes.

 






-- Edited by Hollyhock on Friday 3rd of May 2019 03:52:18 PM

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Fijane wrote:
Stella, I think you have hit the nail on the head. Precocious children do annoy me significantly, and it is probably that about Bella that is behind my dislike of her. To be honest, there is probably a cultural aspect as well, as precociousness is considered a real fault in Australia. Over-confident adults are not applauded here, either. From my judgement (through tv and movies!) I think we find that more repellent than other countries seem to.

Interesting comments, Fijane and Stella. I very much agree about precocious children being annoying for adults (this is exactly what I meant when I said that Bella seemed to be somewhat of a nuisance to her parents). I wouldn't say that the reason behind it is envy, though - I rather think it is these childrens' attitude of knowing better than the rest of the world and reluctance to take any guidance or advice that adults find particularly irritating.

In any case, I also think that it is precisely these children whom their parents find exasperating that tend to end up as successful adults. I wonder if WG would agree, as this seems to be what's happening across the Poldark books quite a lot: the "good", "non-problematic" children become troubled, largely unfulfilled adults (I'm thinking Francis, Elizabeth, Jeremy or Clowance here), whereas the "bold & reckless" ones appear to mostly have luck on their side (beginning with Ross, then Geoffrey Charles, Bella, and probably also Henry).

In fact, this makes me think that perhaps it is their eventual success that makes me drawn to the likes of Bella and Ross more than those of Jeremy and Clowance? Always cheering for the winning team



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Stella Poldark wrote:
Fijane wrote:

I am interested in your comments below, Little Henry. I find every example you give to be true, and yet the paradox I find with Bella is that I cannot like her despite all of that evidence. Maybe that is why Bella Poldark is a less enjoyable book for me.

Out of all the children, Bella is my least favourite, by a long way. Yet I find it hard to verbalise or give references as to why that is so. I do feel she is spoiled, at least to some extent. I agree with Hollyhock's argument, that all the children were to some extent. They probably had to be, in order for WG to be able to develop storylines that depended on the child acting defiantly and against the values of their parents.

 

 Fijane - I think Bella was a precocious child. Adults tend not to like such people perhaps because they envy them their apparent self confidence. Like you, I am not particularly fond of Bella but she was a very confident and determined child and adult. Women tend to envy such people and men find them fascinating.


Stella, I think you have hit the nail on the head. Precocious children do annoy me significantly, and it is probably that about Bella that is behind my dislike of her. To be honest, there is probably a cultural aspect as well, as precociousness is considered a real fault in Australia. Over-confident adults are not applauded here, either. From my judgement (through tv and movies!) I think we find that more repellent than other countries seem to.



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My pleasure Doug. The first time I finished Bella I wanted to jump up and down on my tablet in frustration because I thought the ending abrupt and inconclusive. Similar to TabithaB below, after my emotional roller-coaster ride through 12 books I wanted a clear cut 'happily ever after.' I've since come to terms with the ending, sort of, and believe the Christmas party would have helped bring the relationship back to its former depths--at least until the next crisis. Demelza never brooded for long and the party, with all the family's loved ones, would have helped comfort Ross in his deeply felt, private grief. I'm happy that WG did at least give us a glimpse of Little Henry's and Bella's futures.

Tabitha--it is interesting that WG used that particular, prime space to have Ross include Harriet in his reflections. But I think he wanted to show Ross's turbulent state of mind (plus he was concussed). I also think he wanted to hold out the possibility of a closer family friendship once George died. Ross's attraction to Harriet was similar to his fondness for Caroline. As Demelza told Clowance and Bella, Ross was naturally attracted to young arrogant females because they had traits similar to his--fierce independence, disdain of certain societal views... But she knew it didn't go beyond friendship and was confident that Ross had "no wish to be anywhere except at my side. That will be the way it will be, until I die-until we die." (That's a wonderful HEA ending.)  smile

 



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Thank you Hollyhock for your response. Yes, that is the passage of which I was thinking. I would like to believe that by the time Ross and Demelza returned to Cornwall they had recovered a relationship that penetrated to the depths of one's being, to borrow a phrase from Demelza in "The Angry Tide".



-- Edited by DougW on Friday 19th of April 2019 11:49:08 PM

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DougW wrote:

I seem to remember that somewhere very near the end of "Bella Poldark" and significantly after the Ross and Demelza heart to heart talk in the coach to London, she internally reflects that there still remained a slight strain between Ross and herself. I don't remember the exact words. Can anyone give me the context of that reflection by Demelza?


Doug are you thinking of the scene when the audience erupted into thunderous applause at the end of Bella's 1st performance? (I love that WG let us experience that moment from Demelza's, a mother's, perspective.) She was so emotional that she burst into tears, thinking about all that had recently happened, especially with Paul and Valentine. (I've always wondered why WG didn't allow Ross to comfort her instead of Mrs. Pelham.) Demelza reflects that after Ross's narrow escape there had been a coolness between them and a trace remained. The constraint stemmed from the risk he took in trying to rescue Valentine. Her 'coolness' has always been a stretch for me. After Ross's narrow escape I think Demelza would have been so relieved that there would be no room for any remaining resentment about Valentine.



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I seem to remember that somewhere very near the end of "Bella Poldark" and significantly after the Ross and Demelza heart to heart talk in the coach to London, she internally reflects that there still remained a slight strain between Ross and herself. I don't remember the exact words. Can anyone give me the context of that reflection by Demelza?



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How absolutely wonderful.  I hope someday it will be published. So many fans would love to read it.  Demelza's Christmas plans were for me the saving grace of the ending of BP. When I think of the end of the saga I would imagine a happy Christmas that final year.  I think the total reconciliation came on R and D's walk home from Mrs. Pelham's and then the plans for Christmas started.  So glad to hear of it.



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TabithaB wrote:

I'd like to add my observations to this interesting discussion...

I very much liked the character of Bella Poldark.  For me, she seemed to inherit all the positive characteristics of her parents, i.e., Demelza's happy positive spirit and  exuberance as well as Ross' determination and ambition to achieve difficult goals.  I wasn't aware that some of the Bella storyline was based on a real life person.  This makes the reading even more significant and interesting.

As to the book "Bella", I very much enjoyed it as with all of the Poldark novels, even the crazy storylines.  However, I was disappointed with the actual ending of this book.  The last chapter or two center on Bella's future plans and to my horror there was even a short passage of Ross sexually fantasizing about Lady Harriett.  If this was going to be the last book in a long sweeping saga of the Poldark's, I would have much preferred that the last page feature an emotional discussion or reflection between Ross and Demelza.  


 In the Courtney Library within the Royal Cornwall Museum in Truro in Cornwall there are some of WG's documents. If you are ever able to visit it you could view a short story entitled 'Christmas at Nampara 1820'. It has never been published but I think it may have been had WG lived long enough. I cannot say more because of copyright law except to say that I have always felt that the ending of Bella was unsatisfactory. This document is like an epilogue. You would need to contact the person in charge of the library at least 2 weeks before your visit. There are other short stories there written by WG but not published that you would be able to read.



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I'd like to add my observations to this interesting discussion...

I very much liked the character of Bella Poldark.  For me, she seemed to inherit all the positive characteristics of her parents, i.e., Demelza's happy positive spirit and  exuberance as well as Ross' determination and ambition to achieve difficult goals.  I wasn't aware that some of the Bella storyline was based on a real life person.  This makes the reading even more significant and interesting.

As to the book "Bella", I very much enjoyed it as with all of the Poldark novels, even the crazy storylines.  However, I was disappointed with the actual ending of this book.  The last chapter or two center on Bella's future plans and to my horror there was even a short passage of Ross sexually fantasizing about Lady Harriett.  If this was going to be the last book in a long sweeping saga of the Poldark's, I would have much preferred that the last page feature an emotional discussion or reflection between Ross and Demelza.  



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Fijane wrote:

I am interested in your comments below, Little Henry. I find every example you give to be true, and yet the paradox I find with Bella is that I cannot like her despite all of that evidence. Maybe that is why Bella Poldark is a less enjoyable book for me.

Out of all the children, Bella is my least favourite, by a long way. Yet I find it hard to verbalise or give references as to why that is so. I do feel she is spoiled, at least to some extent. I agree with Hollyhock's argument, that all the children were to some extent. They probably had to be, in order for WG to be able to develop storylines that depended on the child acting defiantly and against the values of their parents.

I think the whole "on the stage" storyline turns me against Bella. It seems a little far-fetched, especially the running away and ending up overseas, and all the men who fawned on her. None of those relationships felt real, compared to those that came before in all the other books. They felt fake.

Yet, I don't mind the book, because when you take out the weird storylines, you are left with lots of nuggets about the characters we love.


 Fijane - I think Bella was a precocious child. Adults tend not to like such people perhaps because they envy them their apparent self confidence. Like you, I am not particularly fond of Bella but she was a very confident and determined child and adult. Women tend to envy such people and men find them fascinating.



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Interesting that on page 15 of WG's Memoirs, he describes himself as a "spoiled brat" so I was thinking there might have been a bit of himself in Bella.  He was doted on by his mother and allowed to be what he was born to be - a writer.  He had relatively few setbacks and a great deal of success.  I came across an article about WG that said all through the writing of his last novel he intended to call it "Valentine" and submitted it to the publishers under that name.  It quotes WG as saying,  "I woke at about 4 o'clock one morning and realised it was no longer a book about Valentine, but about Bella.  I had become fascinated by her story."

Also, I simply can't bring myself to dislike a child so loved by R & D.  I like that the last book was named for a child of theirs and think Demelza would have appreciated it.



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It's interesting you feel the story of Bella is far-fetched because WG wrote in his memoirs that he would never have written about her singing had he not come across references to a real singer in the nineteenth century, whose life was mirrored in Bella's story.  There are a few changes, but  it is based on an historical character. 

Just shows that life can be stranger than fiction, sometimes...

 



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Wednesday 17th of April 2019 08:01:00 PM

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I am interested in your comments below, Little Henry. I find every example you give to be true, and yet the paradox I find with Bella is that I cannot like her despite all of that evidence. Maybe that is why Bella Poldark is a less enjoyable book for me.

Out of all the children, Bella is my least favourite, by a long way. Yet I find it hard to verbalise or give references as to why that is so. I do feel she is spoiled, at least to some extent. I agree with Hollyhock's argument, that all the children were to some extent. They probably had to be, in order for WG to be able to develop storylines that depended on the child acting defiantly and against the values of their parents.

I think the whole "on the stage" storyline turns me against Bella. It seems a little far-fetched, especially the running away and ending up overseas, and all the men who fawned on her. None of those relationships felt real, compared to those that came before in all the other books. They felt fake.

Yet, I don't mind the book, because when you take out the weird storylines, you are left with lots of nuggets about the characters we love.



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Blackleburr wrote:
Hollyhock wrote:
Vivian James wrote:

I always thought Bella was a spoliled brat- Cuby, too.  I dont blame Clowance for disliking her.  Her horrible treatment of Jeremy was the reason Jeremy joined the army and was killed.  I was always interested in the books dealing with  the relationship between Ross and Demelza.  The later books about their childrens love lives were kind of boring.  Please no horrible berating from the fans who are so obsessed with the series.  I really enjoyed the first few books.

 

 

 

 


   I don't think Cuby was the reason Jeremy joined the army.  It was more fundamental than that.  He couldn't accept or understand quite why he had masterminded the stage-coach event and realised all too well the implications to everyone, should it ever be discovered.  For that reason, he wanted to get away from the scene, engage in something completely different; to try to forget, which of course he never could.

Hs love for Cuby drove him to distraction and that is most likely why he acted so much out of character, but I don't believe she is the reason for his choosing the army, whatever he told Geoffrey Charles.



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Wednesday 17th of April 2019 07:55:11 PM

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Hollyhock wrote:
Vivian James wrote:

I always thought Bella was a spoliled brat- Cuby, too.  I dont blame Clowance for disliking her.  Her horrible treatment of Jeremy was the reason Jeremy joined the army and was killed.  I was always interested in the books dealing with  the relationship between Ross and Demelza.  The later books about their childrens love lives were kind of boring.  Please no horrible berating from the fans who are so obsessed with the series.  I really enjoyed the first few books.


 

The amazing take away for me is that when WG wrote Bella he was in his 90s. Since he probably knew this would be his final Poldark book, he undoubtedly decided to just have fun with it--especially with Butto and Paul (but Paul was too muchsmile).

The first and last books are my favorites. The latter largely because of Lord Edward Fitzmaurice. He is such a charmingly sweet, gentlemanly character; I would not have enjoyed the book nearly as much if not for his too brief appearances. I was also pleased that two of my other favorites, Ben and Christopher, had happy endings.

Of the two daughters, I'm more drawn to Bella. Twice only, I found her actions indefensible--when she let Maurice's ungentlemanly influence outweigh her sense of propriety. Her running away from Mrs. Pelham--who took her in and treated her like a daughter--was disrespectful and shameful. Equally shabby was her treatment of Christopher, furtively running off with Maurice when he was away. Interestingly, throughout the saga, it seems that it is mostly his male characters that WG torments with unrequited love and betrayals.

Bella's theatrical storyline was totally enthralling. Her presence and self-confidence were admirable and Chris's belief in her talents unshakable. Apparently, Chris's own career was bright but he was willing to subjugate everything for her. Quite unusual for a man of the times. (So many love stories in the final book.)


 

I am torn between your two opinions, Hollyhock and Vivian.

Bella is my favourite  - by far - of all the Poldark children whom we get to see beyond childhood. I do not think of her as a spoiled brat, but she certainly was the sassy one and generally somewhat of a nuisance to her parents. As a flip side of that same coin, though, she also knew quite precisely what she wanted in life - and once she knew it, she went to get it and didn't give a damn about the consequences. And for me, that's exactly what makes her such an interesting character to read about!

As for her stage career storyline, however, I didn't find it particularly believable. I didn't mind Bella turning out very talented, but the way she seemed to just glide from one success to another, with no flops in between (aside from her illness, of course, but that's a different obstacle: not what I would call a career flop) - was a stretch too far for me.

Regarding Bella's suitors, I disagree that it was Maurice who treated her badly and Christopher who was treated badly by her. In fact, I wonder which of the two men behaved less gentlemanly towards her? Is it worse to sleep with your significant other before any marriage plans are considered, or to sleep around with "non-significant others" while being promised to marry that significant one? I suppose the answer could depend on whether the two of you end up being together (in which case the second offence would be worse than the first) or not (in which case it would be other way around)... but in the end this does not help much to solve my dilemma. If anything, it looks like both Christopher and Maurice have made the wrong choice - so to me the case remains open.



-- Edited by Blackleburr on Monday 1st of April 2019 01:13:29 PM

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Thank you Tabetha.

 



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Loved reading this Hollyhock, makes me realise I must reread the saga again soon!



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Vivian James wrote:

I always thought Bella was a spoliled brat- Cuby, too.  I dont blame Clowance for disliking her.  Her horrible treatment of Jeremy was the reason Jeremy joined the army and was killed.  I was always interested in the books dealing with  the relationship between Ross and Demelza.  The later books about their childrens love lives were kind of boring.  Please no horrible berating from the fans who are so obsessed with the series.  I really enjoyed the first few books.


 

The amazing take away for me is that when WG wrote Bella he was in his 90s. Since he probably knew this would be his final Poldark book, he undoubtedly decided to just have fun with it--especially with Butto and Paul (but Paul was too muchsmile).

The first and last books are my favorites. The latter largely because of Lord Edward Fitzmaurice. He is such a charmingly sweet, gentlemanly character; I would not have enjoyed the book nearly as much if not for his too brief appearances. I was also pleased that two of my other favorites, Ben and Christopher, had happy endings.

Regarding Bella being spoiled, I believe all the Poldark children were--spoiled but not obnoxious. Since Bella was for so long the youngest, she just had more people to indulge her. But Clowance was just as spoiled growing up. She knew how to stretch parental limits without suffering consequences--like running away from school and trespassing at Trenwith when she was repeatedly told not to. I sometimes think Demelza was a little in awe of her children because they were gentry born.

I also thought Clowance's anger at Cuby for rejecting Jeremy was hypocritical. After all (at various times), she was just as guilty as Cuby of breaking the hearts of her equally besotted suitors--Edward, Tom Guildford, Philip, poor Ben. But since Jeremy was her brother, I guess Clowance was oblivious to the similarity. (Ben's case especially was very similar to Jeremy's. I was afraid he would run off and join the army after Clowance married Stephen.)

Of the two daughters, I'm more drawn to Bella. Twice only, I found her actions indefensible--when she let Maurice's ungentlemanly influence outweigh her sense of propriety. Her running away from Mrs. Pelham--who took her in and treated her like a daughter--was disrespectful and shameful. Equally shabby was her treatment of Christopher, furtively running off with Maurice when he was away. Interestingly, throughout the saga, it seems that it is mostly his male characters that WG torments with unrequited love and betrayals.

Bella's theatrical storyline was totally enthralling. Her presence and self-confidence were admirable and Chris's belief in her talents unshakable. Apparently, Chris's own career was bright but he was willing to subjugate everything for her. Quite unusual for a man of the times. (So many love stories in the final book.)

WG did a riveting, edge-of-your-seat narration of Bella's Romeo & Juliet performance. I wonder if he saw something of himself in her, the way she beat the odds--and her life-threatening illness--to become a success. If I recall correctly, he too was sickly in his youth.

Anyway, opinions differ but what a finale to an amazing saga by an amazing writer! There are a few plaguey loose ends, but overall WG wrapped up things nicely.

 

 



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To each his own.  



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Date: Mar 23 3:25 AM, 2019
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I am just nearly finished reading "Bella Poldark" having gone through the whole series once again.  Last night I came across this:  "Clowance had sent a WARM invitation to Bella to stay in Lansdowne House . .. Bella had tactfully and affectionately and sweetly refused. . . . Mama, I am so sorry."  These words just don't reflect the character of a "spoiled brat".  Spoiled brats are selfish, rude, disrespecful to young and old alike, have tantrums, are demanding, care not a whit for anyone's feelings and people do not like them.  I see none of this in Bella.  Bella does not demand singing lessons, it was Demelza's idea.  She keeps her feelings about her loss of voice to herself, weeping herself to sleep and it is Demelza who thinks she should talk about it more.  Her siblings all love her as do her neighbours (except for George).  Can't think anywhere in the books that she is disliked.  She is grateful for her parents and for Christopher and Maurice for their interest in her career.  She doesn't like Christopher's drinking but is tolerant and doesn't have a tantrum over it.  These qualities of tolerance and gratitude are unknown to a spoiled brat. 

Ross and Demelza were indulgent to all of their children but would not have tolerated brattishness.  Bella is not rude or disrespectful to her parents.  She learned that by the way they acted towards each other and to their children.  There were limits - Bella was not allowed to use the piano until she was older.  Also, in the book, Bella writes:  "I love you and Papa . . . I love the sea and the clank of the mine engines, and the wind and the wildness.  I love to talk to the folk on the farm, to the bal maidens - the simplicity and the warmth of it all."  Not the expressions of a mere spoiled brat.  Bella is talented and creative, born to be a performer and I am so glad she becomes famous as it hints of further fun and excitement and adventures for Ross and Demelza. 

I have just quickly glanced at some passages newly read but I think I could find many more in other books that she is so much more than some give her credit for.

 

 



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Date: Mar 21 10:11 PM, 2019
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Scrolling to the beginning of this thread I'd realised I'd missed the comparison to Jackie Evancho as Bella.

Wonderful....!!

 



-- Edited by Ross Poldark on Friday 22nd of March 2019 02:21:26 PM

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Date: Mar 21 6:31 PM, 2019
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I found the book quite superfluous.   It is really hard for me to believe that she turned out to be so talented.  Graham must have been grasping at straws when he used that story line.  However I believe his developement of the character of Harriet was pure genius.. What a handful she was for George.  She was a woman way ahead of her time.  Sort of like Demelza.



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Date: Mar 19 12:14 AM, 2019
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I always thought Bella was a spoliled brat- Cuby, too.  I dont blame Clowance for disliking her.  Her horrible treatment of Jeremy was the reason Jeremy joined the army and was killed.  I was always interested in the books dealing with  the relationship between Ross and Demelza.  The later books about their childrens love lives were kind of boring.  Please no horrible berating from the fans who are so obsessed with the series.  I really enjoyed the first few books.



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Date: May 3 7:43 PM, 2012
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I thought it was a poignant scene at the end of the last book when Bella was coming home in a stage coach with her parents, after a performance she had done, and the minute they passed over the line into Cornwall, she asked to step out of the coach and pick up a handfull of dirt to smell it.  To me this symbolised that no matter how famous she might become in the future, she would never forget her humble roots.



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Date: Jun 13 3:21 AM, 2011
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Char Nanfan wrote:

my heart sank a little as i dreaded WG might have included the demise of either Ross or Demelza.


 I did too Char ....

Bronny



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A passionate child rolling in the dust with her ugly dog; a girl driving oxen; a woman....Did anything else matter?



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Date: Jun 12 11:21 AM, 2011
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Ah, Bella, i wonder what you will think of it! I always thought the saga had ended after The Loving CUp because it seemed to me that all ends were tied up, both children married and all safe so i was surprised when The Twisted Sword appeared. I was then even more surprised when Bella appeared and have to say that my heart sank a little as i dreaded WG might have included the demise of either Ross or Demelza.

I await to hear your opinion of this final book.



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Date: Jun 11 10:08 PM, 2011
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Evening Everyone

Sixteen months ago I discovered that Winston Graham had written Bella in 2002.  Being such a huge Poldark fan, I couldn't believe that I had not known.....believing that The Twisted Sword was the end.  In 2002 I was raising my children, and had no knowledge of the internet and I think this is why I did not hear about Bella Poldark.  It was also sixteen months ago that I discovered this forum. I decided not to jump straight into Bella (which I bought in Hardback from e-bay for £1) but to re-read the novels from Book One, seeing as it had been a while. It has been difficult not to flick through Bella Poldark, nor read snippets about it on here. Clearly I am a slow reader, cos it has taken me a year and a half to read the 11 novels.

Last night, I finally picked up my Bella Poldark. As the candles flickered I began Chapter One.....I cannot tell 'ye all how excited I be ..........

Bella



-- Edited by Bella on Saturday 11th of June 2011 10:08:48 PM

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Date: Jun 9 10:57 AM, 2011
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MorwennaCarne wrote:
 And yes, I imagine Bella to perform just like Jackie, but not look like her. I always imagine Bella to have long dark hair and pale skin, with a disposition not unlike Demelza.

 Yes, but Demelza actually had red hair, it's just that on TV, rather like Jessica Rabbit, she was just drawn that way.

As for little Jackie, never heard of her before, don't do "talent" shows, but when she first starts to sing you can only sit there in utter disbelief at such an amazing and mature voice from such a young girl. Stunning. I scrolled through to several other clips and was completely blown away. I just hope that her parents can protect both her and her voice from too much over exposure, and hopefully she matures rather more like Kathryn Jenkins than Charlotte Church.

And yes, as a young and precocious Bella, she'd be ideal.

 

Dwight



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Date: Jun 9 8:12 AM, 2011
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I saw Jackie for the first time on Britain's Got Talent last week. I initially refused to believe that such a young girl could have such a mature voice and perform so gracefully. I agree Namps, she is incredibly articulate, and understated for her capability and talent.
And yes, I imagine Bella to perform just like Jackie, but not look like her. I always imagine Bella to have long dark hair and pale skin, with a disposition not unlike Demelza.

Wenna

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Date: Jun 8 11:19 PM, 2011
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Well it's been quite an interesting evening so far. I've downloaded Internet Explorer 8 yet still no sign of a green bar anywhere, on top of which I still hadn't heard her voice on Firefox or anything else. So for these occasions I keep Millenium which is still working fine including sound !

Agreed what a fantastic mature voice, hard to believe. Very similar to the English woman's on the same type of show last year I thought....amazing !

Ross smile

 



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Date: Jun 8 11:03 PM, 2011
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Hi Ross, yes I have sound and vision, wonderful! Thanks.  Thought this was what I did originally but the video appeared in the post prior to submitting post and then disappeared once posted.  Funny strange, but will have another go.  What do you think of her voice?



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Date: Jun 8 10:48 PM, 2011
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Hi NG,

Difficult one still as there's no sound yet, but once you've clicked on Share in YouTube, look below the blue code that appears and you'll see embed. Then enter the whole code into the tool bar in the usual way.

Are you getting any sound ?

Ross

[video=]



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Date: Jun 8 9:31 PM, 2011
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Hey Bells, can't for the life of me manage to embed a video here anymore, the option has disappeared from the toolbar above.  Try copying and pasting this link below, hope it works.

http://youtu.be/xPITHzdUUDk



-- Edited by Namparagirl on Wednesday 8th of June 2011 10:05:45 PM

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Date: Jun 8 4:44 PM, 2011
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What is it Namps? I can't find it grrrrr ..........

 



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Date: Jun 8 3:48 PM, 2011
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This is absolutely awesome!

 

http://youtu.be/xPITHzdUUDk



-- Edited by Namparagirl on Wednesday 8th of June 2011 09:30:10 PM

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Date: Jun 8 3:25 PM, 2011
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Has anyone seen Jackie Evancho, aged 11 years, perform?  Now she is exactly how I imagine Bella to have been, minus the American accent.  What a big amazing voice for such a small, beautiful and incredibly articulate and assertive 11 year old girl.  She must be the first choice for a young girl to play the part of our Bella.






-- Edited by Namparagirl on Wednesday 8th of June 2011 03:32:27 PM

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Date: May 1 3:19 PM, 2011
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Bella Poldark.



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