Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Most tear jerking moments


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1839
Date: Jan 28 6:20 PM, 2017
Most tear jerking moments
Permalink  
 


Like Dislike Topic transferred across to....

http://poldark.activeboard.com/t63170492/like-or-dislike-a-fiction-books-indefinite-final-ending/



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 316
Date: Jan 28 6:16 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Something I think that one either likes, doesn't like or is left perhaps uncomfortably undecided in the middle....Which of these three do you prefer in any book ?

___________________________________

Interesting, I'd like to comment but shouldn't this be moved to its own topic?



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 28 5:29 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Ross Poldark wrote:
Stella Poldark wrote:

 Is it not possible to see the first four books as a love triangle which substantially works itself through? Then from The Black Moon onwards becomes more about a marriage. So beginning with the focus of three people it changes to two. I'm not sure I understand why you are left uncomfortable.

No I'm not sure that I really do see that the love triangle substantially works itself through, just the same as in Henry Sudermann's short story either.

It's because, as one or two posts on here have already said besides those many fans who wrote to WG over the next twenty years leaving them all wanting for more, I think he deliberately left the ending of the Ward Lock "Warleggan" to the reader's imagination to decide for themselves just as at the end of Bella, and I think from memory one or two of his murder mysteries as well.

Something I think that one either likes, doesn't like or is left perhaps uncomfortably undecided in the middle....

Which of these three do you prefer in any book ? wink


 Your question needs some considerable thought but here are my immediate thoughts as I have experienced them reading the Poldark books. In a saga such as Poldark it is necessary to be allowed to wonder I think. I enjoy being left with questions and wanting to know more at the end of each book. If I had read Warleggan in the 1950s I would have been most unhappy at the end and it would have spoiled the enjoyment of the books for me. So I like some certainty at the end of a story. At the end of Bella there was probably just about enough certainty for me but I would have liked a little more. This is from memory and I need to re-read Bella. At the end of Warleggan Ross and Demelza's relationship is very fragile - perhaps a little too fragile for me.

If I compare WG with Jane Austen I would say that there is more depth in WG's writing because of the uncertainties throughout the stories but I feel a need for some clarity at the end.

Stella

 



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Saturday 28th of January 2017 05:30:49 PM

__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1839
Date: Jan 28 4:12 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Stella Poldark wrote:

 Is it not possible to see the first four books as a love triangle which substantially works itself through? Then from The Black Moon onwards becomes more about a marriage. So beginning with the focus of three people it changes to two. I'm not sure I understand why you are left uncomfortable.

No I'm not sure that I really do see that the love triangle substantially works itself through, just the same as in Henry Sudermann's short story either.

It's because, as one or two posts on here have already said besides those many fans who wrote to WG over the next twenty years leaving them all wanting for more, I think he deliberately left the ending of the Ward Lock "Warleggan" to the reader's imagination to decide for themselves just as at the end of Bella, and I think from memory one or two of his murder mysteries as well.

Something I think that one either likes, doesn't like or is left perhaps uncomfortably undecided in the middle....

Which of these three do you prefer in any book ? wink



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 28 2:43 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Ross Poldark wrote:

I've always treated Warleggan as definitely the absolute end simply because it was WG's original intention anyway. So that this last book I feel must always be judged on how he wanted his original final goal of a love triangle between Ross, Elizabeth and Francis to end and that alone, with his typical trademark of leaving his readers guessing.

This to me has always been his final interpretation of Henry Sudermann's book that inspired him to write Poldark in the first place, "La Donna e mobile" which in Italian roughly means a fickle woman which I think Elizabeth definitely was, and why I think it's not difficult to see the parallel.

Scroll to the very bottom of the thread....

http://poldark.activeboard.com/t42017573/woman-magazine-wg-exclusive-dec-1977/

The remaining books as we all know were unfortunately not his original intention at all, only resulting from his increasing worldwide fans sending him endless letters through the post wanting more and more. (See WG's autobiography Chapter 4 p. 189).

It always leaves me a bit uncomfortable too....


 Is it not possible to see the first four books as a love triangle which substantially works itself through? Then from The Black Moon onwards becomes more about a marriage. So beginning with the focus of three people it changes to two. I'm not sure I understand why you are left uncomfortable.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Jan 26 6:51 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Ross Poldark wrote:

I've always treated Warleggan as definitely the absolute end simply because it was WG's original intention anyway.


 I think that's a valid point. But also, as a writer myself, I know how difficult it can be to leave your favourite characters behind, when you have put so much into bringing them to life - they become like your closest friends. (I have to stop myself letting the main characters from previous books pop in as visitors in later ones!) So I suspect that they would have continued to marinate in his brain, and in the end he would have needed little persuasion to return to their story. 



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 316
Date: Jan 26 5:01 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Stella wrote:

As you say, the end of The Four Swans is very sad with Ross and Demelza's life together somewhat uncertain even though they are trying to understand each other.

________________________________________

The heart wrencher in this for me was when Ross found HA's poem extolling his tryst with Demelza. The emotion that WG imbued in Ross' dawning realization of Demelza's unfaithfulness was tortuous. You could feel his heart breaking and his world being turned inside out. Before this he was in denial about the depth of Demelza's involvement but the poem, literal or not he felt, proved he had to face it. As he later reflects, it was not her probable adultery, but her disloyalty that so devastated him. This was the deciding factor that made him accept Lord Falmouth's offer to run for MP. I too am happy that he did because the role unleashed his greater potential and gave so much positive focus to his restlessness. But the whole episode was a tear jerker.



__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1839
Date: Jan 25 2:12 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

I've always treated Warleggan as definitely the absolute end simply because it was WG's original intention anyway. So that this last book I feel must always be judged on how he wanted his original final goal of a love triangle between Ross, Elizabeth and Francis to end and that alone, with his typical trademark of leaving his readers guessing.

This to me has always been his final interpretation of Henry Sudermann's book that inspired him to write Poldark in the first place, "La Donna e mobile" which in Italian roughly means a fickle woman which I think Elizabeth definitely was, and why I think it's not difficult to see the parallel.

Scroll to the very bottom of the thread....

http://poldark.activeboard.com/t42017573/woman-magazine-wg-exclusive-dec-1977/

The remaining books as we all know were unfortunately not his original intention at all, only resulting from his increasing worldwide fans sending him endless letters through the post wanting more and more. (See WG's autobiography Chapter 4 p. 189).

It always leaves me a bit uncomfortable too....



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Offline
Posts: 899
Date: Jan 25 1:52 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

I agree, Stella, I get affected each time too, but we do know what happens on subsequent readings!  And there is more, much more in another 8 books.

Finding the books early, when they ended with Warleggan, readers thought that was it - the end.  I was desperately sad and longed for more.  I understand loads of readers wrote to WG asking if he would continue, but at that time, he never thought he would.  Thank goodness he changed his mind, even if it was a generation later.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 25 12:16 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Mrs Gimlett wrote:

When I first read it, I had difficulty seeing through the tears in the last chapter of Warleggan.  The reader knows how much Ross and Demelza want to come together again, but it seems so hopeless until Dwight and Caroline retire for the night.

Then Ross starts talking of his love for her and you breathe more evenly, thinking it's all going to be alright, before Demelza adds her bit and suddenly they are more apart than ever.  Each time I read it, I know all will be well, but that last quarrel blows up so quickly it takes the reader on a real roller-coaster;  first time readers are on tenterhooks. 

Finally, those last few paragraphs are so tender; it is a brilliant, clever ending leaving us all wanting more.


 I'm not sure that it's only first time readers Mrs G. Every time I have read this last chapter of Warleggan I have had at least a lump in my throat. cry Even at the end the connection between them feels fragile. I wouldn't have wanted to wait 20 years to find out.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Wednesday 25th of January 2017 12:17:29 PM

__________________


Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Offline
Posts: 899
Date: Jan 25 9:33 AM, 2017
Permalink  
 

When I first read it, I had difficulty seeing through the tears in the last chapter of Warleggan.  The reader knows how much Ross and Demelza want to come together again, but it seems so hopeless until Dwight and Caroline retire for the night.

Then Ross starts talking of his love for her and you breathe more evenly, thinking it's all going to be alright, before Demelza adds her bit and suddenly they are more apart than ever.  Each time I read it, I know all will be well, but that last quarrel blows up so quickly it takes the reader on a real roller-coaster;  first time readers are on tenterhooks. 

Finally, those last few paragraphs are so tender; it is a brilliant, clever ending leaving us all wanting more.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Jan 24 6:56 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Stella Poldark wrote:


 Suzanne - I cannot understand how you can like Hugh Armitage or feel sad when he died. 


 I didn't say I liked him, just that it's sad when a young man - and such a wonderful poet - dies. (OK, I know the poet was really WG!) I was sadder at the impact it had on Ross and Demelza. 



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 24 6:35 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I have no sympathy for Hugh Armitage either, for the reasons you state, Stella.  However, I think Monk Adderley comes lower down the loathed list.  Surely Ossie Whitworth was far worse than Monk. 

 

Ross never really knew whether Demelza had actually been unfaithful, but yes, his mind was in turmoil. He didn't choose to become a MP as a result of Hugh's death - he had agreed his name could go forward when Hugh was ill, in his stead. The reasoning at the time may not have been sound but  I believe it was a good move on his part; it allowed him to expand and use his talents for the good of others.

The end of Four Swans is quite a tear jerker - Demelza and Ross each with their own sadness and thoughts, but also each of them trying to understand the other, which was actually a step forward for them.

 


 Mrs G - Thank you for reminding me about Ossie who was, as you say, far worse than Monk. I think I put Monk further up because he threatened Ross' life as did George but Ossie deserves a higher rating in the 'bad' stakes. I have felt that Ross was fairly sure that Demelza had been actually unfaithful and there is a hint that part of Ross' decision to become an MP was because he wanted to put some distance between Demelza and himself.

As you say, the end of The Four Swans is very sad with Ross and Demelza's life together somewhat uncertain even though they are trying to understand each other.



__________________


Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Offline
Posts: 899
Date: Jan 24 5:03 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

I have no sympathy for Hugh Armitage either, for the reasons you state, Stella.  However, I think Monk Adderley comes lower down the loathed list.  Surely Ossie Whitworth was far worse than Monk. 

 

Ross never really knew whether Demelza had actually been unfaithful, but yes, his mind was in turmoil. He didn't choose to become a MP as a result of Hugh's death - he had agreed his name could go forward when Hugh was ill, in his stead. The reasoning at the time may not have been sound but  I believe it was a good move on his part; it allowed him to expand and use his talents for the good of others.

The end of Four Swans is quite a tear jerker - Demelza and Ross each with their own sadness and thoughts, but also each of them trying to understand the other, which was actually a step forward for them.

 



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 24 4:36 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

SusanneMcCarthy wrote:

I was actually quite sad when Hugh Armitage died. I know he was a wrong'un for luring Demelza into being unfaithful to Ross, but I believe he genuinely loved her, though a love that made him selfish - but he was a young man, with his life cut short, which is always sad. I was mainly sad for Demelza and Ross. She was so upset that he died, and had so many complex emotions she didn't know how to resolve. And sad for Ross who felt the one thing he had been sure of shift beneath his feet, and had to cope with jealousy and the recognition that it was the same hurt he had inflicted on Demelza. He was a man who always struggled with his own emotions, and the one person who could have helped him - Demelza - was the one person he couldn't turn to. And the choice he made, to become an MP and thus spend large parts of the next seventeen (?) years away from home, was sad.

 


 Suzanne - I cannot understand how you can like Hugh Armitage or feel sad when he died. He wanted Demelza and felt entirely entitled to have her. He pursued her relentlessly even though at first she made it clear she wasn't interested in him. He manipulated Demelza's feelings to suit his own ends The man had no moral compass at all - just took what he wanted. I can see no justification for his completely selfish behaviour and after George Warleggan and Monk Adderly I would say he is the third most despicable character in the Poldark books. If he had truly loved Demelza he would not have wanted to create problems in her marriage. 'A Tale of Two Cities' springs to mind and Sidney Carton who sacrificed his love for a woman he loved so that she would be happy, and gave his life for her. That I think is real love.

 



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Jan 24 3:12 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

I was actually quite sad when Hugh Armitage died. I know he was a wrong'un for luring Demelza into being unfaithful to Ross, but I believe he genuinely loved her, though a love that made him selfish - but he was a young man, with his life cut short, which is always sad. I was mainly sad for Demelza and Ross. She was so upset that he died, and had so many complex emotions she didn't know how to resolve. And sad for Ross who felt the one thing he had been sure of shift beneath his feet, and had to cope with jealousy and the recognition that it was the same hurt he had inflicted on Demelza. He was a man who always struggled with his own emotions, and the one person who could have helped him - Demelza - was the one person he couldn't turn to. And the choice he made, to become an MP and thus spend large parts of the next seventeen (?) years away from home, was sad.

I also was very sad at Jeremy's death. You could so see it coming, after the stagecoach robbery - he couldn't just get away with that scott free, and the alternative of him being caught out and hanged would have been awful. Then with marrying Cuby (though I didn't like her much) it upped the stakes, as did him doing so well in the early stages of the battle. It was good that Ross found him before he died, but so sad for Ross, again having to cope with it on his own. 



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 720
Date: Jan 24 1:59 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

At The end of The Angry Tide Ross and Demelza have a very moving but sad conversation.

Demelza 'Afraid, Ross? What of?'

Ross   'Of losing you, I suppose.'

'There's little chance.'

'I don't mean to another man - though that was bad enough. I mean just of losing you physically, as a person, as a companion, as human presence being beside me and with me all my life.'

"Her heart opened to him. 'Ross,' she said, 'there's no chance.Unless you throw me out.'

'It's not a chance, it's a certainty,' he said. 'Seeing Elizabeth like that....We are at the end of a century, at the end of an era...'

'It's just a date'

'No, it isn't. Not for us. Not for anybody; but especially not for us. It's - a watershed. We have come up so far; now we look down.'

'We look onwards, surely.'

'Onwards and down. D'you realise there will come a time, there will have to come a time,  when I shall never hear your voice again, or you mine? It may be sentimental to say so, but this - this fact is something I find intolerable, unthinkable, beyond bearing...'

 

"Demelza moved from her chair suddenly, knelt to the fire and picked up the bellows and began to work them. It was to disguise the tears that had lurched to the edge of her lashes. She realised he had reached some ultimate darkness of the soul, that he struggles in deep waters, and that perhaps only she could stretch out a hand."

'Ross, you mustn't be afraid. It's not like you. Tisn't in your nature.'

'Perhaps one's nature changes as one grows older.'

 



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Tuesday 24th of January 2017 04:21:25 PM

__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 316
Date: Jan 23 4:47 PM, 2017
Permalink  
 

What's the moments in the Poldark books that have moved you the most

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

OMG--Dwight and Caroline's reunion in the Black Moon always leaves me in a sobbing heap--

"Caroline stood there a second, a gentle smile on her face but without visible change of expression. `Well, Dwight.' She took off her hat, shook it once and dropped it on a chair. `So they have dragged you away and you have come to redeem your promises!' She went across, and kissed him on the sores on his lips.

'Caroline! 'He tried to turn his head away.

She said: `Good Heaven, so I still have to make all the advancements. D'you know, my dear, I am never allowed to retain any maidenly modesty, for I have to run after you, to seek you out, and even to kiss you without receiving any embrace in return!" .....

`Caroline, my love, my own ...' 'Ah, hear that, Ross! So he has committed himself at last! I believe we shall have a wedding after all. If we do, it will be the biggest ever in Cornwall. We shall have to hire an Admiralty band and army buglers and the choirs of three churches, all to celebrate that Dr Enys has been caught at last! . . . You see, I am weeping with relief. I am to be saved from the horrors of a spinster's life!" But Dr Enys, you notice, is also weeping, and that, I know, is for his lost freedom.'

`Caroline, please,' Ross said, wiping his hand across his own eyes'..... "

 

 

 

 



-- Edited by Hollyhock on Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 02:48:50 PM

__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 147
Date: May 14 2:01 PM, 2011
Permalink  
 

That is very sad!!



__________________


Honorary Life Member.

Status: Offline
Posts: 508
Date: May 7 12:23 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Jeremy's death without question - I howled like a baby.

Bronny



__________________

Demelza

 

A passionate child rolling in the dust with her ugly dog; a girl driving oxen; a woman....Did anything else matter?



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 147
Date: Oct 7 3:53 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

 It's a mark of a great storyteller and a great writer, than can absorb us in a way that makes us feel what the characters are going through. As with Ross and Demelza, the readers there with them form the beguinning. We read of all their trials and tribulations and when something tragic happnes, we get drawn in.


__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 127
Date: Oct 1 7:52 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

I must admit it also brought a tear to my eye at Julia's death when Demelza wakes in the night and lays eyes on Julia's cot which Ross forgets to remove and cries: 'Oh, Ross ...the cot ...I forgot the cot!'


__________________

A sudden warmth flooded the cove ...and he knew he was home.



Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 468
Date: Apr 21 8:11 AM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Most (all?) medics I know have a healthy disregard to the 'perils of drink' !  I'd say WG may have got it right.....

__________________

Verity



Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Apr 21 12:23 AM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Oh drunk? ... and there was me thinking that all they do is eat homemade cakes every shift!!! Well, that's what they lead us to believe on 'one born every minute' biggrin

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Apr 20 6:47 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Im sure i read that WG attention to detail was second to none and certainly the books are full of well researched topics and information though where he got the idea that midwives were drunk most of the time i dont know........hic!

__________________


Honorary Life Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Apr 20 6:13 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Certainly Ross discovering mortally wounded Jeremy and his subsequent death, and Cuby realising he wouldn't be coming back.

As an aside, I am always amazed at the depth of WG's research. His descriptions of the Battle of Waterloo encouraged me to Google and Wiki the facts, and it all took place exactly as we read about it, down to the battles for holding the farms, still regarded as places of pilgrimage to this very day.

Oh & Clowance's Lord Edward's family still live at Bowood today, which is open to the great unwashed as one of our few remaining Stately Homes still in family ownership.

Dwight

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Apr 20 5:59 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Julias funeral brings a lump to my throat everytime i read it.
Veritys return home after the duel where she sits in her room contemplating her loss and her life.
Caroline asking Ross and Dwight not to bring Demelza at the imminant death of Sarah.
Drake allowing Morwennas tears to fall to prove he wont rush her into any physical relationship
Cuby breaking down at the memory of Jeremys death.

sure there are many more but those are the ones that stand out at present!



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 468
Date: Apr 20 5:48 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

The night that Demelza was leaving - and the beer fermented.

'fraid I wasn't sad when Elizabeth died, she was a bit too devious for my liking - and rejected Francis which started his downfall somewhat.

__________________

Verity



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 147
Date: Apr 20 5:24 PM, 2010
Permalink  
 

What's the moments in the Poldark books that have moved you the most

Mine are in order they happened:

Baby Julia dying.

Francis being found in the mine.

Morwenna so traumatised by her marriage, that she pushes Drake away.

Elizabeth's death, that drew me to tears.

Jeremey's death and Demelza and his families reactions.



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.