Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: A possible Book 13 ? !


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1841
Date: May 2 6:08 PM, 2016
A possible Book 13 ? !
Permalink  
 


Agreed up to a point with George and Harriet, but I think he'd always remain just far too wary and cautious of ever upsetting Harriet in the slightest whatever the situation, for example letting her so contemptuously override him at the beginning about her boarhounds which he detested. My overall feeling is that Harriet could easily put George on the defensive and uncertain about her real motives any time she wanted, even if she had no real intention of carrying anything out knowing full well that George was far too careful to risk any heated confrontation with her and lose all he had achieved.

His public downfall being I think his ultimate fear having ridden over, bankrupted and occasionally destroyed so many local people down the years who he knew for certain would seize on every opportunity to publicly get their own back on him at long last. Worst of all Ross who would practically crucify him and love every minute of it and that would be impossible to live with. He had just far too much to lose.

It took dear old independent Aunt Agatha to achieve that much coveted prize that very luckily for George was never made public and why Ross most probably loved and missed her even more after she'd gone....wink



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Offline
Posts: 899
Date: May 2 4:56 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

These ideas are all very well but I think when Paul went to trial he would be found guilty of murdering his first victim and would then be dragged from the court and hanged fairly swiftly.  That was the punishment - no mitigating circumstances allowed, even for mental cases in those days.  However, I think he would have caught the gaol fever and died before he even got to trial.  Just think of the conditions back then - horrendous - especially for a coward, which I think is what Paul was.

Also no chance of George and Harriet divorcing.  Firstly, he wouldn't want to spend the colossal amount needed to secure a divorce, even if it was granted in Parliament,  but primarily he wouldn't want to divorce Harriet anyway. It would dent his pride too much.  She probably wouldn't want to divorce him - after all she lived exactly how she wanted, hunting, spending his money and taking no notice of him most of the time.  What's not to like?

I would have liked a thirteenth book - to see how Clowance and Edward's marriage developed.  Bella and Christopher would be interesting too, not to mention Harry growing up and maybe inheriting the title.  How would he make his living - mining was declining - and Grace and Leisure not yielding well, so perhaps he was a lawyer or maybe a banker?

Ursula, too, probably ended up at odds with George, just as he alienated GC and Valentine.  Maybe she ran off with some unsuitable scoundrel. I bet those twins grew up just like Harriet too, always around the horses and dogs - another nightmare for George.

Fun to ponder, because we know another book will never happen.



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Monday 2nd of May 2016 05:00:18 PM

__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1841
Date: May 1 7:07 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Interesting....

I daresay WG must have also envisioned many of these scenarios at some stage as well, but if this was to be a part of a book 13 I find it difficult to see George, who owning his own bank would have always undertaken a strict and very stringent risk/ return appraisal and analysis of anything whether in business, real or his personal life anyway, taking those sort of publicly damaging chances as there would be no way of telling what might happen to him and his shareholders etc. if things went seriously wrong. George of course being quite the opposite of Ross...

I think it always will come back to Harriet every time whether before or after any action George might be tempted to take, because of the unquantifiable publicly damaging risks to his bank, his fragile personal life with Harriet and most of his precious self-esteem in society, as even he would know almost exactly what her hot tempered reaction would be; the same as he'd always known that Ross was just the same as well. Most of all knowing she would always hold the trump card every time by threatening to publicly divorce him on the spot for huge damages, as she'd learnt the hard way in her first marriage this time carefully avoiding making the same very costly mistake twice.

By then as you say she was of course also well aware from Stephen's admission to her that it was she who had prevented George from bankrupting him, so if she ever subsequently uncovered any more of George's devious tricks whether before or after the event, he knew without a doubt that he would also be putting his parliamentary career and his vitally self important standing and achievement to have become Sir George Warleggan at risk. He was just far too shrewd, cold and calculating to suffer from such sudden rushes of blood to the head anyway preferring to always bide his time, so if these were the stakes above I can't see him risking all on such a throw of the dice.

I'm also pretty certain that at the slightest hint George was up to something again Ross, Demelza and Clowance would have also wasted no time in putting Harriet in the picture as well and most likely vice versa. And if things really did come to a violent head as in the brawl in The Red Lion Ross always had the Valentine Ace card up his sleeve with the hated memory of Aunt Agatha to make George really lose his cool and do something very costly and stupid which he'd always yearned for.

And I've always felt sure that George knew this was a possibility with Ross at any time Ross chose, and later Harriet. George simply wasn't a gambling man and I think never would be...

 



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 561
Date: May 1 5:02 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Ross,

Good points about the power of Harriet, but she can act only once she knows that George is up to something. After she so deftly played the pregnancy card to force him to back off on bankrupting Stephen Carrington, wouldn't George take greater pains to restrict what she was told and when? 

I think most of the real drama would come before George finds out about Paul's willingness to tell all about the theft from the stage coach. Demelza has to tell Ross and tell him everything, which likely will crush him -- he will never feel the same way about Jeremy -- and infuriate him because she once again hid something important from him because she didn't trust him to be able to handle it like a grownup. Then she and Ross have to tell Clowance, who has her own secret (her marriage to Stephen wasn't valid because his first wife was still alive when they married) to share, and it likely will make her father's head explode. And then Edward has to be told about Stephen and Jeremy's involvement in the theft. (Oh, great, he's still in Parliament so this tawdry story is likely to have legs that reach all the way to London.) One hopes Clowance had the decency -- and good sense -- to tell Edward that after her first husband died, she discovered that he had been guilty of bigamy. If not, the newspapers will be sure to tell him.

I doubt plea bargains existed in 1820, but there had to be some way to use knowledge of another crime plus a willingness to plead guilty to get some sort of sentencing accommodation. The only thing is, would it be possible that knowledge of destruction of evidence in a burglary case (WG keeps calling it a robbery, but it was burglary. The three thieves did not hold up the stage. They broke into strong boxes without the driver's knowledge.) be worth a sentence reduction in a multiple murder and attempted murder case? It doesn't seem likely, but the destroyer of evidence was Demelza Poldark, mother of one of the thieves and mother-in-law of another and wife of that notorious prison-breaker Sir Ross Poldark. Yes, she was the kiler's last victim, but she survived. Oh, George would have to be so tempted to cause mischief. Then again, if he did nothing, Paul would hang and all three thieves would be dead. Case closed. But where is the satisfaction in unmasking a dead war hero as a thief?  Especially one named Poldark.    

Instead of Harriet bullying George into backing off, though, I'd prefer a scene with George, Demelza and Clowance. Mother and daughter go to see him to tell him Paul confessed to the theft from the stage coach while he was terrorizing Demelza, and he told her that Jeremy and Stephen had been his confederates. They tell him they feel terrible about this and want to make restitution for the portions of the theft's proceeds that went to Stephen and Jeremy. Clowance says she always considered the money Stephen inherited to be the foundation on which he built his fortune. Because that money was actually stolen rather inherited, she thinks the bank should have her share of the things Stephen built, the shipping business and their half-finished house, with its money. Would that be of sufficient value to cover two-thirds of the bank's loss? (Jeremy spent his share on outfitting himself for the army and paying the difference between his army pay and the cost of living in Belgium.) Then they tell him what they want in return: his promise that he will do nothing to help Paul get his sentence changed from hanging to transportation to Australia. After what Paul told Demelza about his crimes, she is convinced that he either needs to be executed or placed in a hospital for the criminally insane for the rest of his life. He is a danger to all women and must be kept away from them permanently, she adds. George suggests she must be exaggerating, a natural reaction to a frightening experience. Annoyed, Clowance asks Demelza to tell George exactly what Paul told her. "He said the only way he can experience sexual gratification is by cutting a woman's throat and watching her die," Demelza says. "I remember it very well because he was holding a knife to my throat as he said this." I imagine George doing a quick calculation and determining that this is a far better deal than any court would give him. (Jeremy Poldark was a penniless soldier so his share would be impossible to collect.) Plus, if he doesn't accept this offer, Clowance is likely to appeal the matter to a higher authority, Harriet. And even Harriet would be swayed by the image of Demelza with a knife to her throat.

I do wonder whether there was talk of an expanded remake of the first series (including books 8-11 as well as books 1-7) at the time WG was working on "Bella Poldark." It strikes me that resolution of the stage coach affair would provide a natural way into a 13th book if the new series should need more material to round out a final season. 

As for WG's modern books, I currently am reading "Memoirs of a Private Man" and "Poldark's Cornwall" simultaneously, flipping between them wherever both have something to say on the same subject. I previously read "Marnie," the source material for  one of my favorite Hitchcock movies.  

 



__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1841
Date: Apr 27 11:05 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Yes a lot of interesting areas left I agree, but I think WG was only too astutely aware of the unsolved legacies he was leaving behind knowing full well that there would be bound to be many questions left over many of which you have outlined well. However he always was a lover of mystery and intrigue so if you ever get to read any of his other books, especially his prewar ones summaries of which you'll find in his forums at the bottom of the page, I think you'll begin to understand the many additional facets of his remarkable talents.

One major area however I think you've somewhat underestimated is the considerable power and hold that Lady Harriet finally had over George for in her he had finally found his mental match in all areas, never mind the spectre of his lowly birth which was always his most sensitive spot so I very much doubt she would have ever allowed George free rein to even dare to lift a finger or try to settle old scores against anyone.

Quite simply she was far too well connected and respected in high society and way above his social status to begin with for him to ever risk upsetting her now that to crown it all she was the mother of his two daughters; in addition he only had to remind himself how experienced she was by then with recalcitrant husbands when forced to deal with her previous titled husband. By then too she was of course on good terms with Ross, Demelza and Clowance who don't forget was now the wife of no less than Lord Edward Fitzmaurice and therefore of equal high nobility too, so George would have never stood a chance and was outgunned on all fronts even if he'd wanted differently. And why given these high connections I think Demelza's secret would never have been allowed to see the light of day either....

Have you read WG's autobiography yet "The Memoirs of a Private Man" which is very interesting and revealing, copies usually available very reasonably on EBay....

 



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 561
Date: Apr 26 11:46 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Whether in a Book 13 or added episodes tacked onto the final season of the new "Poldark" series, the cliff-hanger of sorts created near the end of "Bella Poldark" cries out for resolution. The Self-Defence stage-coach affair had been lurking in the background since "The Miller's Dance, and loose threads kept proliferating. The attack on Demelza and Paul Kellow's arrest brought the incident to the forefront again, but Valentine's death and then Bella's stage triumph in London subsequently overshadowed it. However, the matter would have to bubble up again once the Poldarks returned to Cornwall because Paul still had to go on trial, and Demelza would have to be called as a witness. When Paul's lawyer cross-examined her, he would ask her what Paul had told her about the stage-coach affair on the night he tried to kill her. Then the secret she had so carefully guarded for so long would be out, and all her efforts to protect Clowance, Cuby and especially Ross from the truth would have been for naught. 

And what will George Warleggan do about the information served up by Paul's murder trial? Will he demand that Paul be prosecuted for the theft just so he can try to get Demelza charged as an accessory after the fact (she destroyed evidence of the theft, including documents taken from the Warleggan & Willyams strong boxes, and its perpetrators and also hid the loving cup at the bottom of the Holy Well)? George had put so much time, energy and money into trying to follow the money from that one stolen bill that ended up deposited into Harriet's account at the bank that he must feel entitled to some satisfaction. 

But more than any courtroom scene, I want to see Demelza tell Ross about the four books' worth of intrigue she had hidden from him and explain why she did it -- to protect Ross' good opinion of Jeremy and Clowance's good opinion of Stephen. And after hearing the whole story, does Ross make the connection between Demelza's one-night port bender and the Warleggan Bank's scorpion seal for himself or does she have to tell him? (Rereading their conversation the morning after the bender ["The Loving Cup," Book 3, Chapter 3, Section II], I found every clue needed to figure out what had led her to reach for the port bottle: Ben unwittingly had brought her proof that Jeremy was involved in the theft from the stage coach.)  Is he finally reassured that she is not going to turn into a raging dipsomaniac?

A scene that would have to be included for comic relief would have Ross discussing the matter with Geoffrey Charles, who had to confess that Jeremy had told him about theft before he went into the army and that when he (GC) learned whose money had been taken, he had laughed uproariously for several minutes. 

But will George run into trouble with Harriet if he tries to get Demelza prosecuted for destroying evidence, given her close friendship with Clowance and her fondness for Ross? 

Will Bella decide that the only way to keep George from trying to put her mother in prison is to stage "The Merchant of Venice" in the assembly rooms in Truro so she can try to turn George's heart with Portia's "quality of mercy" speech? 

As for Clowance, how does she take learning that the foundation of Stephen's successful shipping business was stolen money? Will she decide to hand over the business and their unfinished house to George to repay Stephen's share of what was taken?  Would the business and the house be worth enough to repay Jeremy's share as well -- and do Ross and Demelza insist that Clowance let them repay her for Jeremy's share? (In researching all this, will George's lawyers be able to determine whether Clowance's marriage to Stephen was even valid, and if not, was she his rightful heir or should his estate have gone to his son, Jason?) 

There really is enough unfinished business for a whole book:

1. Ursula's fascination with Bella and George's past efforts to make sure they never meet: Will he wind up kicking himself when he discovers that Bella's fiancé is Christopher Havergal, a new member of the inner circle of the Rothschilds' London operation? Will he then launch one of his charm initiatives to curry favor with Christopher? Will he encourage Ursula to make friends with Bella, and will the friendship eventually lead Ursula to tap her innate business talents and become a theatrical impresario? 

2. Morwenna: Does she achieve her goal of conquering her fear of the "ghosts" of her past? Does she reach out to her son to find out whether he wants a place in her life or just crashed the party at Trenwith because he was curious to get a look at this mother who abandoned him to marry a lowly boatbuilder? If he wants a relationship, can she get beyond his obnoxiousness and can he get beyond the lower social position of Morwenna, Drake and Loveday? Does he find out what a horrible man his father was? 

3. Do Edward and Clowance find a place in Cornwall? Do they buy the burned-out hulk of Place House from Selina? (That would put them between Trenwith and Nampara.) Is that money, plus the earnings of Wheal Elizabeth, enough to keep her and Georgie independent of George? Does Selina marry again? If so, does Georgie remain with her and her new husband or wind up at Nampara or Cardew -- or shuttling between the two under terms of a custody agreement worked out by Demelza, Selina, Caroline and Harriet and forced upon Ross and George? 

4. Do Cuby and Philip get over their concerns about being each other's second choice and marry? 

5. Does Dr. Anselm, the quack Elizabeth saw in London, end up in some kind of scandal that gives Dwight a good idea who sold Elizabeth the bottle he found in her bedroom the day she died and what it had contained? Does Ross ever tell Dwight about his suggestion to Elizabeth -- if she ever had another baby, she should get her dates mixed up so she could pass off a full-term baby off as a premature one -- and does Dwight tell him that his stupid idea probably cost Elizabeth her life? 

6. Do Rowella and her husband, the little librarian, ever turn up again? Has she become a notorious adventuress or did the beating she took for her liaison with Ossie Wentworth cure her of the urge to con men out of money?

7. What about Caroline's long-lost father? Did he really die in Africa or did he take another wife and create a second family? Will the aged explorer turn up in England after all these years? Is he really Caroline's father or an imposter? 



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jun 25 7:25 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Char Nanfan wrote:

I agree Dwight, no sequel! I do  not and did not ever want to read that Ross or Demelza had died, it would be unthinkable.

I would love for unpublished manuscripts to be found as i cant imagine any one but WG writing the poldark books. I have read a couple of books where a new author has continued the saga of a well loved novel and for me , it hasnt worked. I could never quite accept it was the same characters. Every author has his own way of writing and especially with poldark and WG  we have so many books, his style is very evident and for me irreplaceable. I live in hope that a secret stash of unpublished poldark books are discovered or even notes would be fascinating!


 I do not think anyone could match Mr. Graham's style. So many failed attempts to copy style out there for other authors, it's like Afghanistan... graveyard of empires.

A commercial follow-on book would probably meet the same fate as the failed TV re-make. It's not the real thing.



__________________


Honorary Life Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Jun 24 9:59 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Just two or three quick thoughts this morning.

Were it ever to be possible, I would certainly be thinking about an officially sanctioned author, definitely not fan fiction.

While it is fairly unlikely that an unpublished manuscript is lying around somewhere in some dusty cupboard or attic, notes or a notebook is far more likely.

As I have previously discussed, the first novel springs into life, with a fairly considerable back history already in place, leave alone Aunt Agatha's century of memories. Joshua's wild days with Tholly, his quieter years with Grace and the birth of their children, the building of Nampara for her, the death of Grace (her epitaph??), and then his adventures again with Tholly. The escapades of Ross in his school days, his first clashes with George, his misdemeanors which led him to join the Army, and escape to America, his teenage romance (did they or didn't they! ! ?!?!?) with Elizabeth. Her romance with Francis.

I've only been skimming SFTS so far, but there is a considearble amount of reference to what happened after Elizabeth's death at the end of 1799, and Ross re-emerging in Portugal towards the end of 1810, plus all we now know of the main characters lives and loves from 1783 until December 1799. The lodes in that mine of history could be at least as rich as the tin lodes discoverd in Wheal Grace. Surely there must have been notes made while the research was being done, and surely they must be with WG's legacy papers somewhere within his estate.

Dwight



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Jun 24 8:32 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

I agree Dwight, no sequel! I do  not and did not ever want to read that Ross or Demelza had died, it would be unthinkable.

I would love for unpublished manuscripts to be found as i cant imagine any one but WG writing the poldark books. I have read a couple of books where a new author has continued the saga of a well loved novel and for me , it hasnt worked. I could never quite accept it was the same characters. Every author has his own way of writing and especially with poldark and WG  we have so many books, his style is very evident and for me irreplaceable. I live in hope that a secret stash of unpublished poldark books are discovered or even notes would be fascinating!



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jun 24 6:14 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Dwight wrote:

If a new writing were ever to happen, then the new writer would need to study and imbue himself with Poldark, much as us fans have done through the years. If he were then to be thinking of a prequel, or whatever sort of ...quel we could call the missing years fill-in, WG has scattered many hints through the first few books of the back history. In fact it has always amazed me just how effectively the first novel bursts into life, just as if there has  always been a back history. And the same thing applies within the pages of SFTS, where WG lists at least four out of five of the overseas adventures Ross undertook on behalf of the powers that be between 1800 & 1810. Then of course there was the birth of Isabella-Rose, Sophie, and Melliora which could also be explored in much greater detail, not to mention how Elizabeth's death had immediately affected all the main protagonists, plus of course Harris Pascoe had died, as had Lord Falmouth, in fiction and in fact. There is certainly much material outlined which could be expanded by a skilful author, and preferably in the style and feel of the pre SFTS days.

I have just recently finished my umpteenth re-reading of the first seven books, and am really struggling to get into SFTS, it really does move forwards in a quantum leap from the original familiar world Nampara which we had all come to know and love so well. Which brings me on to the suggestion for an outright sequel. Most of us have reservations about where Bella took us, and in any case, as WG obviously knew that this really would be his last re-visit, nearly all of HIS loose ends were tied up. Then for me, as my own mortality is creeping up on me, I'm not too keen on learning about the mortality of Ross and Demelza, particaularly as Dwight & Caroline have already been shuffled off into bit part players. By definition, WG has not left any hints as to what might happen in the future, so this would be really moving forward into the uncharted imagination of a new writer, and I'd rather stay behind with the hints which WG left us. So for me, by all means a prequel, plus an xxxquel filling in the missing years, but for preference, no sequel.

Just thinking about the missing years, and the hints as to what took place during that interegnum, it is almost as if WG had sketched it out in some detail, and then abandoned the project, to move further forwards in time, so who knows, maybe here is a missing manuscript, or an unfinished draft just waiting to be discovered. We can only dream.

 

Dwight


This is called fan fiction, and it is forbidden by the literary estate.

I expect to be able to write it in the year 2084. I will be past 120 years old at the time... :)



__________________


Honorary Life Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Jun 23 7:54 PM, 2011
Permalink  
 

If a new writing were ever to happen, then the new writer would need to study and imbue himself with Poldark, much as us fans have done through the years. If he were then to be thinking of a prequel, or whatever sort of ...quel we could call the missing years fill-in, WG has scattered many hints through the first few books of the back history. In fact it has always amazed me just how effectively the first novel bursts into life, just as if there has  always been a back history. And the same thing applies within the pages of SFTS, where WG lists at least four out of five of the overseas adventures Ross undertook on behalf of the powers that be between 1800 & 1810. Then of course there was the birth of Isabella-Rose, Sophie, and Melliora which could also be explored in much greater detail, not to mention how Elizabeth's death had immediately affected all the main protagonists, plus of course Harris Pascoe had died, as had Lord Falmouth, in fiction and in fact. There is certainly much material outlined which could be expanded by a skilful author, and preferably in the style and feel of the pre SFTS days.

I have just recently finished my umpteenth re-reading of the first seven books, and am really struggling to get into SFTS, it really does move forwards in a quantum leap from the original familiar world Nampara which we had all come to know and love so well. Which brings me on to the suggestion for an outright sequel. Most of us have reservations about where Bella took us, and in any case, as WG obviously knew that this really would be his last re-visit, nearly all of HIS loose ends were tied up. Then for me, as my own mortality is creeping up on me, I'm not too keen on learning about the mortality of Ross and Demelza, particaularly as Dwight & Caroline have already been shuffled off into bit part players. By definition, WG has not left any hints as to what might happen in the future, so this would be really moving forward into the uncharted imagination of a new writer, and I'd rather stay behind with the hints which WG left us. So for me, by all means a prequel, plus an xxxquel filling in the missing years, but for preference, no sequel.

Just thinking about the missing years, and the hints as to what took place during that interegnum, it is almost as if WG had sketched it out in some detail, and then abandoned the project, to move further forwards in time, so who knows, maybe here is a missing manuscript, or an unfinished draft just waiting to be discovered. We can only dream.

 

Dwight



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jun 23 3:08 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Well, y'all could start with Geoffrey de Trenwith...



__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Jun 22 10:00 PM, 2011
Permalink  
 

I agree with everyone too, yes, yes and yes to all three - the prequel, the missing years up to 1810 and a book 13, but maybe I'm just plain greedy.  Haven't thought of the prequel idea before but the more I do, the more interesting the prospect becomes, but so sad that it will never happen unless a secret and unpublished manuscript proven to be the authentic work of WG appears on the scene.  What a glorious thought smile



__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Jun 22 5:48 PM, 2011
Permalink  
 

I agree, it would be fascinating to have more detail from those missing years but i would actually like a prequel! To read about the adventures of Joshua Poldark, how he got this reputation, his  marriage to his beloved Grace, the friendship and camaraderie between Ross and Francis as boyhood friends and of course the romance between Ross and Elizabeth would be marvellous and would answer so many questions bout the characters later behaviour. Seeing  the contrast between Ross's upbringing and Demelzas more brutal childhood would be fascinating and im sure there would be plenty of interesting stories from the villagers and tenants. To read in detail Jud and Prudies first meeting would , im sure, be a delight!



__________________


Honorary Life Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Jun 22 9:03 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

Hi Wally,

EX-teremely impressed by your research into character ages, I reckon you must have a spread sheet prepared, listing all possible character dates of birth and how they march through the years.

However, I stay with my premise of an infill being a more satisfying proposition, and also less likely to move away from WG's outlines, as a certain if limited amount of background to the missing years is sketched in within the pages of TSFTS. Tis all a matter of personal opinion of course, but as I mentioned in my previous post, for me, some of the original magic was lost as WG expanded his canvas, as he himself moved on, through the last five books, and in particular, the final novel. I would have preferred to learn more of the missing years in the style and emotion of those first sixteen or seventeen Poldark years.

This is why I brought in the analogy of the Martha Morgan saga. It's NOT Poldark, but the same vast sweep of a central character moving through her lifetime history, being interwoven with real history, in a landscape and demographic equally as fascinating as eighteenth century Cornwall, is equally compelling. So when some of Martha's missing years were filled in, it was a great joy to return to her middle years, particularly as other characters which we had lost were also able to tell more of their story.

This is why, for me, learning more about what happened to Nampara between 1800 & 1810, would be of greater interest than what happened after 1820. Poldark, as it stands, by definition, is an unfinished history, but in many respects, it is also a time capsule comprising twenty three years of a thirty three year time frame, which is why I would rather like to infill the gaps before expanding the time frame.

Dwight



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jun 22 5:32 AM, 2011
Permalink  
 

A mid-stream book is a possibility, but a sequel makes for a more appealing read, for a mass audience.

Note that the Next Next Gen will be born in the 1820's. Georgie, for example, will not be 21, and able to take over the bank, until 1839. Sir George would be 81, and very Uncle Cary like...

Bella will be 21 in 1823.

Harry will be 21 in 1833.

Noelle will be 21 in 1836.

Ursula will be 21 in- gasp 1820! And Conan is 24 in 1820. Aieee!

Loveday will be 21 in 1822.

Sophie will be 21 in 1824, Mel possibly by 1825/6.

Juanna will be 21 in 1835.

 

So, there is a decade wide spread in the new cast.

Ross/Demelza: 60/50 in 1820, 70/60 in 1830, 80/70 in 1840.

Dwight/Caroline: 60/52 in 1824, 70/62 in 1834, 80/72 in 1844.

 

1839 (the Great Warleggan Turnover/Coup):

Ross- 79 (has to live to fight Darth Sir George in wheelchairs with lightsabers)

Demelza- 69 (stroke/heart attack risk?)

Dwight- 75 (long shot, bad health)

Caroline- 67 (family history of diabetes)

Verity- 81! Andrew Sr. would be 91? With heart trouble? Jr would be 44.

Drake and Morwenna- 63.

Jodie De La Blache- 62.

Harriet- 59. The twins- 24.

Geoffrey Charles- 55. Amadora- 46.

Selina- 60.

Ursula- 40. Conan- 44.

Cuby- 48. (Possibly Phillip as well) Jeremy would have been 48. Oldest children 18.

Clowance- 45. Edward- 55. Oldest children 18.

Bella- 37. Christopher- 49. Oldest children 18

Loveday- 38

Sophie- 36. Mel 34?

Harry- 27

Juanna- 26

Noelle- 24

Georgie- 21



__________________


Honorary Life Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Jun 21 9:58 PM, 2011
Permalink  
 

No, not a Book Thirteen, rather a Book Seven & A Half might be a better idea. I've made mention previously about the "Angel Montain Saga" written by Welsh author Brian John, similar in scope and history to our beloved Poldark, although without a significant Ross figure, but rather a very feisty Demelza heroine in the magnificent Martha Morgan. So why the connection? Well Brian killed off his heroine in old age at the end of a very active and fulfilling life, in fact in some ways he killed her off twice, so bringing here back a third time, even in the realms of historic fiction, would probably be  tad unbelievable, but rather like us Poldark fans, the fans of Martha Morgan still kept asking Brian for more. Luckily, as Brian is still very much with us, he was able to oblige, and in due course, another Angel Mountain book arrived, but this time filling in a four year gap in Martha's loves and lives.

Now, like many of us, in my mind Poldark just seems to divide itself up quite naturally into the period covered by the TV Series, ie the first four forties and fifties books, and the next three seventies books. In fact, in some ways, rather like the TV Series, for me, Poldark as I really emotionally connect with it, comes to an end with Elizabeth's death at the end of "The Angry Tide". Then, while WG only took a four year gap from Poldark, Ross & Demelza were away for nigh on eleven. When they came back, a lot seemed to have happened, including several more children arriving, not to mention the involvement of Ross in various affairs of State. In fact although I'm only just starting into "The Stranger from the Sea" once again, a small amount of the back history is being filled in, rather like the back history was sketched in at the beginning of the first Poldark novel. And no, I don't really like Stephen Carrington either.

Just to mention a few recent "resurrections", Jeffrey Deaver has just published a new James Bond novel, Robert Ludlum is apparently still  publishing new works from beyond the grave, Dick Francis son is continuing in the family tradition, and as mentioned in an earlier reply on this thread, we are likely to see a new Conan Doyle Estate sanctioned Sherlock Holmes. So there is a good track record these days in Publishers keeping previous characters, or authors, alive.

So my thought is that rather than seeing Ross and Demelza moving on into old age in a post Bella/Bhutto, Book Fourteen, world, would it not be more emotionally satisfying to continue from, and move forward slighty from the Poldark world of the first seven books, rather than the final five? Perhaps then we could learn more about what happened to our favourite people in the eleven years when they were away from us. And who knows, as WG is no longer with us to bring Ross and Demelza back, maybe Brian John could be persuaded to look at the project. It's uncanny in a way, but not only did Collins, who originally published the first couple of Martha Morgan novels compare them to WG's Poldark, certain historical events which WG included on the periphery of Poldark, also impinged on Brian John's characters in Martha's turbulent world.

Well, just my 2p's worth. In today's world, maybe we would be more likely to achieve a further book, than an additional TV Series, and probably more likely to stay closer to the Poldark world in which we'd all quite like to live.

Dwight



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jul 24 2:56 AM, 2010
Permalink  
 

RDP5 wrote:

Hi poldarkgirl!

The evening Ross and Demelza go and witness the pilchard haul is my absolute favorite part of the Book 1.  I can't say how many times I have read that book and just remained on the part.



A great scene.

 



__________________


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 14
Date: Jul 24 2:14 AM, 2010
Permalink  
 

Hi poldarkgirl!

The evening Ross and Demelza go and witness the pilchard haul is my absolute favorite part of the Book 1.  I can't say how many times I have read that book and just remained on the part. 

__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Aug 4 1:02 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

namparagirl wrote:

biggrin Wish you better luck than Aunt Agatha then! wink

-- Edited by namparagirl on Wednesday 29th of July 2009 10:56:05 AM



I will definitely not be as good-looking as Aunt Agatha, should I survive past a century.... :)

 



__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Jul 29 10:55 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

biggrin Wish you better luck than Aunt Agatha then! wink

-- Edited by namparagirl on Wednesday 29th of July 2009 10:56:05 AM

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jul 29 12:28 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

namparagirl wrote:

Intrigued about your ideas Wally!




I'll be executed for treason for uttering them. :)

Gotta live out the next century until things go into the public domain. Ah, well.



__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Jul 29 12:24 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Intrigued about your ideas Wally!

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Jul 29 12:22 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Hi Wally, talking about a possible remake of the story, I agree with you that the best option would be for a sequel, continuing the story from series 2.  Even better still would be if the original actors could play their parts as much as possible; would definitely need Angharad to play Demelza and Robin to play Ross.  They could both succeed in carrying off their original roles as the older characters brilliantly.  Wouldn't it be fabulous if this ever became a reality.

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jul 29 12:17 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Char Nanfan wrote:

Hi Wally, I have been advised that Fanfiction is not encouraged on this site but  thankyou very much for asking first.. Your ideas are safe for the moment!



My ideas are never safe! :)

Acknowledged on the fanfic restriction.

 



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Jul 28 12:22 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Hi Wally, I have been advised that Fanfiction is not encouraged on this site but  thankyou very much for asking first.. Your ideas are safe for the moment!



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Jul 27 8:23 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

It would be interesting to explore alternative storylines, for example if Ross had married Elizabeth?? How long before he pushed her down a mine ?? If he had left Demelza at Redruth fair to fend for herself , would she have remained a miners brat? would Ross have married Ruth Teague?? ah the possibilities are endless........

__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jul 27 8:09 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Thanks, Char. There is a very active fanfic community for Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and other period authors. I thought I would ask first.

Kill off Ross or Demelza?!?

I have no desire to visit *that* circle of Hell.

Ross, if he lived to be 80, would make it to roughly 1840. I can see Demelza easily rivalling Aunt Agatha (and didn't Agatha give Clowance *her* locket?- scary music...).

Wally.

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Jul 27 7:51 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Hi Wally, in answer to your question about fanfic, im not sure at present how WG's estate feel about fanfiction. Some authors encourage it (JK Rowling is delighted apparantly that so many people write their own Harry Potter stories) but some do not . I hope to answer your query soon!

Incidentally i have read two sequels to very well known and loved novels (Rebecca and Gone with the Wind) and though i enjoyed both, it was very obvious it was a different author and that they were written decades apart.

I dont know how ild feel about Poldark being continued by another author, i would always worry they were going to kill off ROss and Demelza!!!

__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 468
Date: Jul 27 9:48 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

In the Lord Peter Wimsey series of books by Dorothy L Sayers, the final book titled 'Thrones, Dominations' is partly written by the late Dorothy L Sayers.  She died before completing the book so it has been completed by Jill Paton Walsh.

It says on the back cover "when a fragment, forgotten for many years, was found in her agents safe, the trustees of the Sayers estate decided to ask the distinguished novelist Jill Paton Walsh to complete it"  and "it is like reading another Sayers novel"

I think you can spot some very minor differences in style at one point but overall it is a brilliant book, and effectively tidies up loose ends, so it can be done!

__________________

Verity



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Jul 27 6:20 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Getting a new rendition of the original Poldark off the ground would be difficult. Story development would take longer than the original BBC production, and I think Mr. Graham's family would like to see it well done.

But then, I never thought I would see a rendition of Horatio Hornblower make it... :)

A sequel series would probably be easier. Until then, we can only hope.

Does the Graham estate permit fanfic? Edited and moderated, of course.

I would like nothing better than to have my ideas stolen. :)

Wally, USAF (Ret).

__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 85
Date: Jun 6 3:27 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

I agree with everything that Namparagirl says re the books vs the TV series.  If WG had been involved from the beginning with the TV series I believe we would have had something that brought out the development of the love story so central to the characters of Ross and Demelza.  I love reading the pages of the pilchard fishing evening when Ross falls in love with Demelza and can never read those pages without crying!  I wonder whether any of this could be captured on film as WGs first four books are really for reading and slowing getting to know and love the characters - very hard to capture on film.  Also is it possible to re-create the TV series as the actors that played the original parts made them so much their own that they would be hard acts to follow?  Having said that, a completely new generation of viewer could possibly accept different actors and love the stories in the same way that we do.   

__________________
poe grubb


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: Jun 1 10:29 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 



I know we have all endlessly discussed and mulled this over, but just supposing a complete remake of the whole Poldark saga was funded and filmed, I think that Richard Armitage would make a great Ross and Holliday Granger could be a wonderful Demelza.  See what you think, have a look at them together in the latest version of Robin Hood:-

or even Lucy Griffiths as Demelza, these two look perfect together:











-- Edited by namparagirl on Tuesday 2nd of June 2009 01:39:40 PM

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: May 5 1:55 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Poldark was one of the most successful and ground breaking UK TV series and as we know still commands enormous popularity, both in the UK and worldwide.  Yes, during the '70's it was a phenomenon, evening services in Cornwall were delayed to enable viewers to watch the programme, an almost unknown occurrence, (of course this was in an era before the dawn of new video technology.)  I don't know who owns the film rights, seem to recall that Robin Ellis owned the rights to the Stranger from the Sea book for a while, McW will know I think.  As far as WG's family are concerned it is another thing that would need to be investigated, unless someone out there knows the answer?

As we know, Poldark still commands vast numbers of loyal and devoted fans worldwide.  Presently there seems to be a big resurgence of interest in new releases of 1970-80's UK TV dramas, there is no reason why this should not include the possibility of re-awakening public interest in Poldark.  The rapid response by Yesterday UKTV to requests to re-screen Poldark in June '09, almost immediately after its last TV airing in March is proof that TV companies feel this is worthwhile and will be successful in commanding excellent viewing figures.  Somehow we have to find a way of building upon this success, now is as good a time as ever. 

Maybe we need to band together and raise an online petition calling for either a total remake or continuation of Poldark to be considered.  We could think about composing a template letter to be adapted and sent by all interested Poldark fans to organisations like the BBC, ITV, This Morning, GMTV local TV News (they all seem to have a section highlighting 'what's on', TV Production Agencies, individual film producers and directors (they all have agents.)  Raise awareness that Poldark is back again on TV with local radio, newpapers etc.

Richard Branson has a home half a mile from where I live, maybe it would be worth posting a letter, highlighting the fact that we are interested in bring Poldark back to the forefront and politely asking for advice and support.  He may have contacts he can direct us to, he's an extremely nice guy.  My husband is friends with Nicky Lyndhurst of Only Fools and Horses, who also lives down the road from us - maybe he can help.  My daughter and her friend were extras in a film with Jennifer Anniston and Clive Owen a few years ago, met them both on set, spent some time with them, has photos taken with them.  Her friends Dad is a film producer and has worked on 'Girl with a Pearl Earring', Foyle's War among a few, so when he is back in the UK it may be worth a word in his ear?

It may take a while, but nothing is impossible, as they say 'from little acorns ...', but just to sit back and say it will never be done is nothing short of defeatism - we have to be positive and above all take every opportunity to highlight the fact that Poldark is still a phenomenon to be reckoned with.

-- Edited by namparagirl on Tuesday 5th of May 2009 02:01:19 PM

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 106
Date: May 5 12:18 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

I feel sure that if it was possible to either do a complete remake or dramatise the last books,someone would have done it by now....

Poldark was something of a phenomenon back in the 70s wasn't it.
Weren't the evening church services put off/cancelled because of Poldark?

Did we ever find out who owns the film rights?

Does WG's family have anything to do with it?


Nampargirl wrote.(Can't suss the quote thing,sorry!)
 There is always the possibility of procuring funding, be it for a completely new production or for a continuation, the question is how determined we are to find it.

How??



-- Edited by zolabud on Tuesday 5th of May 2009 12:30:09 AM

__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: May 4 11:52 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

I firmly believe that the gentle development of the relationship between Ross and Demelza, as documented by WG in his book, deserves to be faithfully respected by any new script writers, in the case of any future remake of the Poldark saga.  It forms the central core of the story, the beating heart of the whole saga.

There is more than sufficient material in the original storyline to captivate an audience and keep them entranced as the relationship between Ross and Demelza slowly evolves into a familiar and easy friendship, eventually developing to reveal the emergence of a deep, enduring and passionate love story .  If this was carefully and sensitively reproduced in a new adaptation, adhering as closely as possible to the book, it would contain more than enough excitement, romance and humour to capture the imagination of future viewers and retain their interest in the lives of the Poldark family.  To my mind the original story does not need to be sensationalised, overly dramatised or wrapped up in glitzy fashion, to ensure success.  If it was faithfully reproduced using the expertise of modern film technology whilst retaining its fundamental down to earth realism and natural ambience, it could not fail to be a success.  

I personally choose not to ever say never, believing that deep within the realms of improbability, there exists the faintest glimmer of possibility which can be ignited and restored by the wisdom, integrity and determination of one or more loyal, steadfast and nostalgic supporters.  There is always the possibility of procuring funding, be it for a completely new production or for a continuation, the question is how determined we are to find it?

 

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: May 4 3:50 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

I agree, a completely new adaptation is overdue and because it has been thirty years since the first and only production , it will be new to an awful lot of people.
I cant agree about the   basis of Ross and Demelzas marriage though i know that tv drama depends on more dramatic events. I could  accept if they had made the pregnancy the basis of the marriage if they hadnt changed Demelzas  personality and behaviour so much. They portrayed her as far more worldly and experienced than she was in the book and even hinted  that she was a prostitute(why??) They failed  to show the extent and depth of Ross and Demelzas friendship, the fact that they were much more than master and servant and how their relationship developed over the years. I appreciate that the books can take the time to develop things gradually but i do feel that they made some drastic changes which completely altered the nature of the novels.
It seems to me that whatever your introduction to poldark was , that  will always be the defining version.  

__________________


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 19
Date: May 4 5:19 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

There is no way anyone would fund a continuation of the original series;  the most successful and important part of the story is the beginning of it, and it would be commercially impractical to build upon the first two series by funding only a continuation.  There have been too many technical advances since the original (which was successful at the time but which would not have the incredible following among today's crowd, who are used to the new and more glitzy period pieces done today, like Jane Eyre with Toby Stephens, etc.)  Actually I think that if they really really spent a lot of money and got top notch talent, and used all the innovations there are in tv production, it would be fabulous to see a recreation.  It wouldn't take away from the original;  it would just be a new take on the story. 

What I think would be interesting would be how they'd handle the beginning of the story;  I'm not sure that the way the books treat Ross and Demelza's marriage has enough excitement.  Elizabeth was subtly involved in their relationship in the book, but in the series she was truly a third party in their marriage.  Anyway I'd love to see how another screenwriter would write it. 

__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: May 3 8:34 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Bella, book 12, takes the story of the Poldarks up to 1820, so Ross would be aged 60 and Demelza 50.  This is why I think Robin and Angharad would be perfect still for their original roles if the story was filmed onwards from Stranger from the Sea, as Robin is now early 60's and Angharad in her 50's.  I'm reading the books through again and onto The Loving Cup now, which like all the others has been wonderfully and perceptively written. 

I agree with McW about Bella being my least favourite book, I was a little disappointed with the storyline but put it down to WG's age when writing this last book, feeling that it was not up to his original standard - owch sorry about that folks!

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: May 3 5:00 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Bella is indeed the Last Poldark book and is quite different to the others, WG's love of crime and murder mystery crept into the poldark world as well as some strange  characters including an Ape called Butto.  Still a great read but I found it a disturbing book and one that threatened the familiarity and peace of my personal poldark world. THere , thats got you intrigued now hasnt it???

__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 106
Date: May 3 4:12 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Is Bella the last Poldark book then?

How old are Ross and Demelza in it?



__________________


Fan

Status: Offline
Posts: 36
Date: May 3 3:20 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

I love it!!
"the perfect ending" (if there had to be one)

__________________
t a josland


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: May 3 11:52 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Yes, I know what you mean, can't bear the thought of them being killed off and only want Ross and Demelza to live happily ever after. 

But if there was a book 13 and they did die I would want them to drift away peacefully together from old age, and thought the perfect time would be in bed on the evening after a tremendous knees up to celebrate Ross's 100th birthday, when they expire together from heart failure brought on by intense happiness, a little loving, merriment, dancing a little too energetically and, of course, drinking a few too many port and brandys.



__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: May 3 6:13 AM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Noooooooooooo, I have never really got over the fact that the story continued after The Loving Cup, always felt that that was the end of the story, everything tied up nicely and everyone accounted for. I coulndt cope with another book, my biggest fear was that Demelza or Ross would die!

__________________


Honorary life member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1217
Date: May 2 1:58 PM, 2009
Permalink  
 

Hi Greg, just found this post and loved your plan - YES YES YES!!!! Agree it has to be - Ross just has to die HAPPY!!!!! and preferably they go together, he and Demelza, just drift away together peacefully in their sleep on the night following Ross's hundreth birthday party!!!

-- Edited by namparagirl on Saturday 2nd of May 2009 02:10:04 PM

__________________

Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 235
Date: Sep 25 4:22 AM, 2008
Permalink  
 

Much as we love the BBC series, someone is going to remake Poldark. When they do, they'll go beyond "Bella".

The major variable is how the literary estate wants to pursue things.

__________________


Forum Moderator

Status: Offline
Posts: 228
Date: Sep 23 7:10 PM, 2008
Permalink  
 

This thread transferred across from "Bella"
in 12 Poldark Novels Forum as was going off topic.


Hi Wally

Love your follow-ups - really amusing ! Can't remember if there's a name for it but I've occasionally seen sites where people take it in turns to write a chapter about something, then the next person has a go.... Similar in a way to a Round Robin ?

Can't think of a prize or how to finish but is anyone up for a short/ long (?) Book 13 just for fun ? biggrin  Opening a new sub-forum and making it a Sticky.

If so how about kicking off yourself Wally from where the coach carrying Ross, Demelza and Bella on their way back to Nampara has pulled up just the other side of Polson Bridge outside Launceston, and Bella is telling them to smell her handful of Cornish earth ?

Suggest using WG's earliest format (in Ross Poldark) of Book One, several Chapters and sub chapters with say a maximum of 1000/ 1500 words in each sub chapter using the Word Count facility in Tools ? Any other thoughts or suggestions ?

Must admit I've never really thought beyond Bella !! And if Jud and Prudie are still around ? Interesting to think how Ross and Harriet could suddenly hit it off partly to upset George and how Music and Ben's sister might be handled as well. Then if he's not too old Mark Daniel re-appears !!

Could be fun !

Greg
smile


#########################################

august1229 wrote:

I agree, the murder mystery was a bit lame as it just came out that Paul was the guilty party, and even Capt. P. didn't really solve it. 

I too don't take that much to Bella - having her lose her voice to the morbid sore throat obviously was interesting, though. 

WG seemed to feel he must tie up loose ends.  Though we don't know for sure if Cuby ever remarried.  I don't know that he had to kill off Valentine, but the verbiage about how it had all started so many years ago seemed to indicate he thought the Valentine saga needed to be wrapped up.  The ape was a strange addition to the story. 

I always had thought maybe one of Ross' children and one of George's would fall in love - though that never happened, you can see it maybe with Henry and one of the twins.  Uniting the houses, so to speak.   By that time, Ross and George would be too old to really oppose it, and no one else in the families seems interested in taking up the feud. 



Posted by Wally Greer 23/9/08

I think the intent was to link up Cuby and Phillip Prideux. Both damaged people, still suffering. Philip shows he has beaten his PTSD by *not* killing Paul Kellow. There is also all kinds of foreshadowing going on, linking Philip and Cuby in the book.

There is a classic Cornwall: CSI in the making here. Wounded war hero, turned cop, has to deal with balancing a delicate family life (with a possibly wild child stepdaughter) and solving crimes, and archeology.

And I think Noelle goes wild with Georgie Warleggan! Selina was Jeremy's for the taking. (Blew it) And the breach between Carne and Chenoweth gets another bridge. I think Loveday will be the Geek Girl Goddess for some lucky minor noble...Drake and Morwenna become "great aunt/uncle" for Amadora and Geoffrey's children.

The last (and worst) of the stagecoach robbers meets his end. All the Kellows die.

Of all Clowance's beaus, next to Ben, I feel sorriest for Tom, from the Miller's Dance. Clowance has to settle for Mr. Close Enough in Edward. Maybe Tom comes back, filthy rich?

How about Harry as the cleverest criminal defense lawyer in Britain? Married to an parlormaid/ex-jewel thief, played by a young Jean Marsh (after being betrayed by a titled blond)? The jewel thief and the young barrister are drawn together by trust, not lust (she gets backstabbed by her lover, played by Sean Bean). They save each other. Harry And Etta.

Dwight finally works himself to death, dying before Ross. Only Demelza can keep Caroline alive (repaying her for Caroline's trust over Demelza's affair).

Sophie and Meliora have very different lives. Sophie as troubled trophy wife, Mel as healer (she inherits Dwight's psych and med skills) and happy mother and grandmother. London's Secret Counselor? Profiler? Lots of tie-ins with Cornwall CSI and Poldark Of The Bailey.

Ursula and Ossie wreak havoc on each other. No end of trouble.

The Warleggan twins (Sarah and Anne) find genuine warmth and happiness as teenagers with Edward and Clowance. They stay the school terms with them.

James Blamey (the elder) returns, after a distinguished career in the Navy, to business. Verity's younger son son stays on as a packet captain, until disability (heart trouble?) puts him on the beach. Verity lives to very old age, rivalling Agatha, with increasing numbers of grateful grandkids. Unlike Agatha, everybody wants to be near her.

And Demelza as the Cornish Goddess/White Witch protecting them all in the next life. Ross will die happy.



-- Edited by Greg at 11:16, 2008-09-24

__________________

She had said to him: 'Well, boy,' and his life had changed.
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.