Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: 22. Marnie - 1961


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 561
Date: Mar 30 3:59 PM, 2019
RE: Marnie The novel as I see it.
Permalink  
 


Dave wrote:

Marnie is a novel about a marriage, a subject where  Winston Graham's writing is exceptional and engaging.

Mark Rutland, husband of Marnie is a good man and a wonderful husband in this novel. Mark saved Marnie twice. Marnie, Mark's wife, eventually comes to understand and appreciate Mark rescuing her, saving her and protecting her.

 

I think I am the only person in the universe who thinks this is the novel's central theme.


Dave, you aren't alone. Alfred Hitchcock himself seemingly agreed with you. In his film adaptation of "Marnie,"  he emphasized that angle to the point of changing the ending to "make sense" Marnie's problem with men.

I remember being appalled by the liberty Hitchcock had taken with WG's ending when I finally read the novel. (As a horse-crazy  kid, I loved "Marnie" for the scenes with Forio, her horse -- except the final one, of course -- but I didn't know it was based on a novel until I happened upon a list of WG's works after I started reading the "Poldark" books.) It struck me that the guardians of America's old Motion Picture Code must have been tied in knots with that ending. The code's No. 1 rule was crime cannot pay, and WG made Marnie face the consequences for her crimes. Hitchcock let her off and sent her back to her privileged new life with Mark. Admittedly, she was a very sick woman, and presumably, he would make sure she got the help she needed, but she did get away with murder literally and figuratively. (I understand that the cause of Marnie's problems had to be changed. American movie audiences in the early 1960s weren't ready for something like WG's explanation, but were they ready for a little girl to beat a man to death with a fireplace poker -- even if he had been manhandling her mother -- instead? BTW I didn't like WG version of the trauma that shaped Marnie and even found the ending a little less than satisfying, but Hitchcock did overstep.) 

I can't remember WG's memoirs well enough -- and I have yet to unpack my books from my recent cross-country move -- to recall whether he wrote about the experience of Hitchcock making a movie of one of his books -- and changing not only the setting but also the ending. It strikes me that the Hitchcock experience had to have made him more wary of the BBC making the first Poldark series, and I don't understand why he signed the first contract without obtaining some kind of creative control as a precaution. It probably would have prevented the departures from the books that he found dismaying and likely would have made those episodes better. 

One more thing, Dave, did you see a little Dwight Enys in Mark Rutland? I didn't when I started the book -- I knew the movie too well and was seeing pre-Bond Sean Connery instead -- but by the end, I was seeing traces of Dwight.

 



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 219
Date: Mar 27 1:17 PM, 2019
Permalink  
 

Marnie is a novel about a marriage, a subject where  Winston Graham's writing is exceptional and engaging.

Mark Rutland, husband of Marnie is a good man and a wonderful husband in this novel. Mark saved Marnie twice. Marnie, Mark's wife, eventually comes to understand and appreciate Mark rescuing her, saving her and protecting her.

 

I think I am the only person in the universe who thinks this is the novel's central theme.



__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1810
Date: Nov 21 1:59 PM, 2012
RE: 22. Marnie - 1961
Permalink  
 


Extract concerning Princess Grace Kelly and WG's film "Marnie" from the book "Princess Grace" by Steven Englund published in 1984.

ISBN number : 0-7221-3335-9

With grateful acknowledgements

 

Grace Kelly 1.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 2.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 3.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 4.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 5.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 6.JPG

 

Grace Kelly 8.JPG



Attachments
__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 194
Date: Sep 10 3:20 PM, 2012
Marnie
Permalink  
 


I just started reading Marnie!  Anyone else read this book?



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 996
Date: Sep 9 9:30 PM, 2008
RE: 22. Marnie - 1961
Permalink  
 


Marnie is one of my favourite films but i saw the movie before i read the book and so had nothing to compare it with. I was disapointed when i read the book that they had changed the film location to the USA and so a lot of the english elements of the book were lost. I always liked Tippi Hedren although she wasnt the greatest actress. I always think she would have made a good Elizabeth, blonde, virginal and on a pedestal. 

__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 103
Date: Sep 9 3:15 AM, 2008
Permalink  
 

I just finished this. 

A really interesting book.  It was hard to put down. 

Now I want to check the film out of the library.

Marnie must have been really beautiful.  That's the explanation for Mark trying to make excuses for her.  We know she is a thief, with no remorse, and yet we have someone trying to get her off as though she's the victim. 


__________________
Tedn right.  Tedn proper.  Tedn just.  Tedn British!


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1810
Date: Sep 9 11:48 AM, 2004
Permalink  
 

22. Marnie - 1961

"Long, immensely readable character study of a young woman thief.... A crime novel with no violence, considerable suspense, and of great distinction". Spectator

"One of the best half-dozen novelists in the country." Books and Bookmen.

"The superb novel of psychological suspense that became a world famous classic Hitchcock film starring Tippie Hedren and Sean Connery. Marnie seems a charming young woman, efficient, professional but a rebel against society and the law however no one knows her real name or anything about her at all. Now Marnie has walked into a trap. The game is over - or would be - if the man who trapped her hadn't caught himself as well."



-- Edited by Ross Poldark on Sunday 27th of January 2013 11:12:21 AM



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.