Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: 15. Cordelia - 1949


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 12 10:31 AM, 2018
RE: 15. Cordelia - 1949
Permalink  
 


Little Henry wrote:

I'll let you know how my re-read goes. Feel free to post any thoughts as they come which is what I tend to do. I think we've covered the overall feel and personalities of the characters and I'll look for little details that I overlooked that are interesting.


Yes this is the best idea and given that the Christmas season is approaching we can post as and when. If there is a time gap it won't matter.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 12 5:01 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I'll let you know how my re-read goes. Feel free to post any thoughts as they come which is what I tend to do. I think we've covered the overall feel and personalities of the characters and I'll look for little details that I overlooked that are interesting.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 12 12:52 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Stella, I admire your re-reading Cordelia a third time, is it? I wasn't sure I wanted to read it again but will start and see what happens. The only books I have ever re-read are the Poldark books and I have learned from them that each reading reveals something new that was missed. I will be slow though so after Christmas would be best. Thank you for the good wishes and I send the same to you.


Little Henry - only a second timesmileNot sure I would want to read it a third time. I shall continue with my re-read but if you prefer not that's fine. We have a much more demanding read ahead, do we not?wink



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 11 11:31 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Stella, I admire your re-reading Cordelia a third time, is it? I wasn't sure I wanted to read it again but will start and see what happens. The only books I have ever re-read are the Poldark books and I have learned from them that each reading reveals something new that was missed. I will be slow though so after Christmas would be best. Thank you for the good wishes and I send the same to you.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 11 5:21 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry - Can we clarify please where we are with the discussion of Cordelia? I am re-reading now so if you are too perhaps we could finish our discussion after Christmas? Meanwhile I wish you an enjoyable and restful Christmas.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 6 10:12 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Cordelia had "affection" and "deep regard" and was "fond of" Brook and that could make a good marriage if a deeper love doesn't come along. I think she wanted to love Brook but it just wasn't there. Funny that he was a poet but because of his lack of romantic love for her, was not the kind that could sway a girl. Only in his last poem did he put passion into it, almost too much venom though. WG writes about so many different kinds and levels of love. I did like Stephen because of the strength of his love for Cordelia and even in the end he seemed ready to go off with her despite his apparent involvement with another woman. Mind you, I don't like these men who pursue married women relentlessly but it seems necessary for the plot. I like your comment that you didn't warm to her but she creates an interest, which is I think the result of good writing and why I liked the book as a whole. I feel I would benefit from re-reading the book too but Christmas is taking over my life right now and life gets busy up to the end of December. I did re-read the very short prologue and wonder what the significance of carving her initials was. The house is now old and dusty after ending the book with such a positive outlook and the interest in her son's inheritance. I hadn't thought this book could have a sequel but I find myself wondering what happened.


Yes I agree that WG writes about many different kinds and levels of love. I shall have to re-read it all in one go as there is much I have forgotten. At first I liked Stephen but I thought he put a little too much pressure on Cordelia. However, she didn't manage to keep her resolve not to see him. I clearly remember that I couldn't put the book down as I wanted to know what was coming next. WG is a master of thissmile

I, too wanted to know what happened next and I felt a bit cheated about the ending but I think those two got together, don't you?wink Cordelia is a fascinating and very strong character and seemed very real to me. Of course there are strong characters in the Poldark books too.

Like you, I am getting busy with Christmas preparations and after that I am having cataract surgery so will be out of circulation from 8th January until second week of February with, hopefully, a gap in-between, assuming nothing goes wrong. Meanwhile I may post again but will understand if you do not reply for a while.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 6 5:49 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Cordelia had "affection" and "deep regard" and was "fond of" Brook and that could make a good marriage if a deeper love doesn't come along. I think she wanted to love Brook but it just wasn't there. Funny that he was a poet but because of his lack of romantic love for her, was not the kind that could sway a girl. Only in his last poem did he put passion into it, almost too much venom though. WG writes about so many different kinds and levels of love. I did like Stephen because of the strength of his love for Cordelia and even in the end he seemed ready to go off with her despite his apparent involvement with another woman. Mind you, I don't like these men who pursue married women relentlessly but it seems necessary for the plot. I like your comment that you didn't warm to her but she creates an interest, which is I think the result of good writing and why I liked the book as a whole. I feel I would benefit from re-reading the book too but Christmas is taking over my life right now and life gets busy up to the end of December. I did re-read the very short prologue and wonder what the significance of carving her initials was. The house is now old and dusty after ending the book with such a positive outlook and the interest in her son's inheritance. I hadn't thought this book could have a sequel but I find myself wondering what happened.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 5 1:21 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry - I have now refreshed my memory of Cordelia at the start of the book. She shows no interest in emotional aspects of a relationship, but rather the comforts it will bring her if she marries Brook. She wants to be without worry of having little money, to travel, to go to dances and hear music and give parties in her own home. All this seems a bit shallow. Brook, by contrast, seems a rather flat character, lacking personality and excitement.

Despite all this, it very soon becomes obvious that Frederick chose well when he identified Cordelia as a good choice of wife for Brook although she turns out to be useful to him. Cordelia is very sure of what she wants and love doesn't feature in the early part of the story. At this stage I did not warm to her although she creates an interest from the start.

We can assume, I think that Brook was unable to produce a child. There are hints that he was unable to give Margaret a child.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Wednesday 5th of December 2018 01:23:11 AM

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 2 11:03 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

It is almost unfair to say I don't love these characters as it is just compared to the characters in Poldark. Nobody in Cordelia is unlikeable (not even Mr. Ferguson), they are all well drawn but the story is the driving force. Nothing much is said about the sex life of Cordelia and Brook and I don't think it was anything to write home about, being passionless. The death of Margaret is intriguing but the mystery seems to end when the pills were found, having been hidden by Margaret herself, so there was no suicide or wrongdoing concerning the pills. So I can't remember her actual cause of death, just illness and stress I think. A second reading would be beneficial.

When I think of it, most of the non-Poldark books I've read this year do not have characters that I "love". How fortunate to have 12 WG books that are so loved and worth studying. I'm pretty sure if I had read Cordelia without knowing of the Poldark books, I would want to read more of his books though.

Grove Hall takes on a life of its own at the end and becomes a character almost as strong as Nampara and Trenwith. She feels its familiar sights and sounds and smells with dread at first but when she is welcomed home by the two men I feel her melt and relax as if she belongs there. After all, her name is carved on the upper mantelpiece.


I agree with you that nobody in Cordelia is unlikeable although I didn't much care for Stephen even before I knew he was married. He seemed to lack depth yet stood out from all the others but perhaps not in a good way.

It seems clear that the marriage of Brook and Margaret did not include love. Cordelia does some detective work of her own going through papers in the loft but I cannot remember if she actually found anything concrete.

I hadn't thought about Grove Hall but yes you are right about it being a character of its own like Nampara and Trenwith. I also think perhaps the factory was also somewhat in this category. Cordelia was somehow different when she was at the factory.

Yes we are fortunate to have the 12 Poldark books but I was at the stage where I needed to read something else and decided I wanted to read other books by Winston. I began 'The Forgotten Story' but didn't finish it although I intend to go back to it. It was so very slow in getting into the story and did not grab me. So I was delighted to find Cordelia.

Of course Cordelia didn't love Brook and the marriage appeared to be arranged but Cordelia made the best of it and even turned it to her advantage.

I think it is a pity that other non Poldark books by WG are not discussed here, especially as this is a forum for all his books, not only the Poldark books.

I shall continue with my re-reading and hopefully our conversation about Cordelia.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 2 10:42 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

It is almost unfair to say I don't love these characters as it is just compared to the characters in Poldark. Nobody in Cordelia is unlikeable (not even Mr. Ferguson), they are all well drawn but the story is the driving force. Nothing much is said about the sex life of Cordelia and Brook and I don't think it was anything to write home about, being passionless. The death of Margaret is intriguing but the mystery seems to end when the pills were found, having been hidden by Margaret herself, so there was no suicide or wrongdoing concerning the pills. So I can't remember her actual cause of death, just illness and stress I think. A second reading would be beneficial.

When I think of it, most of the non-Poldark books I've read this year do not have characters that I "love". How fortunate to have 12 WG books that are so loved and worth studying. I'm pretty sure if I had read Cordelia without knowing of the Poldark books, I would want to read more of his books though.

Grove Hall takes on a life of its own at the end and becomes a character almost as strong as Nampara and Trenwith. She feels its familiar sights and sounds and smells with dread at first but when she is welcomed home by the two men I feel her melt and relax as if she belongs there. After all, her name is carved on the upper mantelpiece.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 1 9:03 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Yes, she is more like Elizabeth when I think about it but strangely I never thought about Elizabeth when reading the book. All of these 3 female characters keep a secret about their infidelity and they are never found out by the main characters who matter, ie their husbands. I often wonder what WG is saying about infidelity. Because it would be so hard to tell their secrets and to suffer the consequences which could be dire I think Cordelia shouldn't have been so hard on Stephen about not telling her about his wife. His being married was also a surprise for me. Also, that Cordelia got pregnant was a surprise to me. And her mother keeps on having children - I think 17 which is excessive to me.

I can go either way with the ending because in the end I am not in love with these characters. The romantic in me wanted her to live happily ever after with Stephen. Their love was strong I believe but there were hints that he was spoilt and always wanted to get what he wanted. But he really did want her to leave Brook and go with him to London. He was really very likeable. For the heroine of a story to choose money, status and security over romanticism is interesting especially as it was written in 1949. And I'm sure she takes over as "foreman" of the mill. I think the Dr. was brought in to give hope for love in Cordelia's future. Her going back was much like Elizabeth marrying George for security but ultimately being quite happy. Cordelia had heart but ultimately she was ruled by her head.


Yes Cordelia was mostly ruled by her head but, as you say surprisingly got pregnant. So Stephen must have tugged strongly at her emotions. But so did her son and she put his interests first.

I don't recall that we are told anything about the sex life of Cordelia and Brook Ferguson. I did wonder if there was any, or if so why she didn't get pregnant. As in the Poldark books, there is quite a lot of important details we are not given. As I recall, we are not told much about Brook's first wife or even the circumstances of her death. We are only told about Cordelia's attempts to find out about her.

I suppose that I too am not in love with these characters but at each stage of the story I wanted the best for Cordelia because she tried to do the 'right' thing especially in relation to Ferguson senior and the factory. Like Demelza, she was a woman ahead of her time.

Once I have re-read this book I know i shall have a lot more to say. Meanwhile let us carry on with your reactions and thoughts until I have caught up a bit.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Saturday 1st of December 2018 09:04:38 PM

__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 1 6:01 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Yes, she is more like Elizabeth when I think about it but strangely I never thought about Elizabeth when reading the book. All of these 3 female characters keep a secret about their infidelity and they are never found out by the main characters who matter, ie their husbands. I often wonder what WG is saying about infidelity. Because it would be so hard to tell their secrets and to suffer the consequences which could be dire I think Cordelia shouldn't have been so hard on Stephen about not telling her about his wife. His being married was also a surprise for me. Also, that Cordelia got pregnant was a surprise to me. And her mother keeps on having children - I think 17 which is excessive to me.

I can go either way with the ending because in the end I am not in love with these characters. The romantic in me wanted her to live happily ever after with Stephen. Their love was strong I believe but there were hints that he was spoilt and always wanted to get what he wanted. But he really did want her to leave Brook and go with him to London. He was really very likeable. For the heroine of a story to choose money, status and security over romanticism is interesting especially as it was written in 1949. And I'm sure she takes over as "foreman" of the mill. I think the Dr. was brought in to give hope for love in Cordelia's future. Her going back was much like Elizabeth marrying George for security but ultimately being quite happy. Cordelia had heart but ultimately she was ruled by her head.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 1 11:17 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

The story takes place about 80 years later than the Poldarks and there is a completely different feel about the time and place. It feels quite "modern". Manchester does not have the drama of Cornwall but the weather still plays a big part. I even got quite intrigued by the descriptions of the dyeing mill workings even if I didn't understand it all. This book was written after only 2 of the Poldark books were written and I felt there were pieces of the future Demelza in Cordelia - especially with the infidelity and the pulling of loyalties. A huge difference though in that Cordelia didn't love her husband. But neither of them had any remorse about infidelity, just anxiety and worry that someone would find out and I have a bit of trouble with that. I came across the fact that Cordelia was the name of King Lear's daughter and looked up her character as I wondered if WG had named her that for a reason. She was praised mostly for her honesty in not flattering her father just to inherit land and there are some parallels in the stories. Cordelia tells Stephen near the end that if he had told the truth about his wife she would never have deserted him but she is, on her part, so dishonest in not telling him that Brook had died and not telling him that he was the father of Ian, I can't think of her as an honest person. Much like honest, true and loyal Demelza who had a few secrets.

I was surprised by a few things and one of them was the doctor suddenly seeming to be in love with Cordelia. I too was going to look for earlier clues to that. I don't think it was obvious. I will think about the other surprises I had including the ending but will close now.


Little Henry - I agree with most of what you say about Cordelia's character but not all. She knew that, once she had told Stephen about the child, she would never be free of him and the decision about her future life could no longer be hers. The scandal of what she had done would affect her child and his security. Although her decisions after finding out about Stephen's wife, came as a surprise to me, on reflection I saw that she had a very wise head. Cordelia is a very interesting character. She has a good sense of right and wrong but is able to see the wider picture. Although she does look after her own interests, she does consider others as well. I agree she is not the loveable character of Demelza but they have one thing in common; they both care about their child. I think I admire Cordelia, rather than love her as I do Demelza. In some ways Cordelia is a bit like Elizabeth.

Like you, I found the industrial Manchester very interesting. Also, I was intrigued by the way her relationship with her father-in-law developed.

More anon.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Dec 1 5:01 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

The story takes place about 80 years later than the Poldarks and there is a completely different feel about the time and place. It feels quite "modern". Manchester does not have the drama of Cornwall but the weather still plays a big part. I even got quite intrigued by the descriptions of the dyeing mill workings even if I didn't understand it all. This book was written after only 2 of the Poldark books were written and I felt there were pieces of the future Demelza in Cordelia - especially with the infidelity and the pulling of loyalties. A huge difference though in that Cordelia didn't love her husband. But neither of them had any remorse about infidelity, just anxiety and worry that someone would find out and I have a bit of trouble with that. I came across the fact that Cordelia was the name of King Lear's daughter and looked up her character as I wondered if WG had named her that for a reason. She was praised mostly for her honesty in not flattering her father just to inherit land and there are some parallels in the stories. Cordelia tells Stephen near the end that if he had told the truth about his wife she would never have deserted him but she is, on her part, so dishonest in not telling him that Brook had died and not telling him that he was the father of Ian, I can't think of her as an honest person. Much like honest, true and loyal Demelza who had a few secrets.

I was surprised by a few things and one of them was the doctor suddenly seeming to be in love with Cordelia. I too was going to look for earlier clues to that. I don't think it was obvious. I will think about the other surprises I had including the ending but will close now.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Dec 1 1:16 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

I have finished reading "Cordelia" and enjoyed it very much. Have you finished your second reading? At first I thought I would read it without thinking about the Poldark books but when I started counting the number of times he used the word "fumbling" I knew it was hopeless. We have looked at his writing in such detail on the site! I loved the intrigue and suspense and surprises, never knowing what would happen next. I love re-reading the Poldark books and get something different from them every time but of course the suspense isn't there. All the elements of WG's writing that are discussed in the topics are there - dance, humour, loyalty, honesty, love, forgiveness, etc. etc. and especially wonderful characters that seem real. I'm just briefly starting the discussion very generally. How do we discuss the ending - I suppose with a "spoiler alert".


Little Henry - It's good to hear from you as I've been thinking about Cordelia but haven't yet re-read it. I will start that tomorrow. I completely missed the significance of the doctor. How could I miss that! I, too, loved the intrigue and surprises and never knowing what would happen next. It is a very different story to the Poldarks but I enjoyed it. Of course there were far fewer characters in this book than the Poldarks which made it easier to read and to focus more on all the characters. I found myself wanting her to make certain decisions but she certainly had a mind of her own. Also, she managed people so well and was prepared to look at things from others' perspectives. Did you get many surprises as you read it?

I will post again as soon as I have re-read a few chapters. As no one else has shown any interest in this I'm not sure there is a need for spoiler alerts.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Nov 30 11:20 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I have finished reading "Cordelia" and enjoyed it very much. Have you finished your second reading? At first I thought I would read it without thinking about the Poldark books but when I started counting the number of times he used the word "fumbling" I knew it was hopeless. We have looked at his writing in such detail on the site! I loved the intrigue and suspense and surprises, never knowing what would happen next. I love re-reading the Poldark books and get something different from them every time but of course the suspense isn't there. All the elements of WG's writing that are discussed in the topics are there - dance, humour, loyalty, honesty, love, forgiveness, etc. etc. and especially wonderful characters that seem real. I'm just briefly starting the discussion very generally. How do we discuss the ending - I suppose with a "spoiler alert".



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Nov 12 9:51 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Stella, just to let you know I haven't received "Cordelia" yet. Our Canada Post is having rotating strikes and everything is delayed. More than delayed I think as I am waiting for 4 book orders, one of them being "A Dictionary of Historical Slang" which I ordered on June 29 and still haven't received. I've told the booksellers I will be patient and hope eventually to get my orders.


Little Henry - thank you so much for letting me know. It's OK as I have been so busy recently and I need to re-read it as I have forgotten a lot. I will start the re-read very soon so please let me know when you are ready to discuss it.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Nov 12 8:30 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Stella, just to let you know I haven't received "Cordelia" yet. Our Canada Post is having rotating strikes and everything is delayed. More than delayed I think as I am waiting for 4 book orders, one of them being "A Dictionary of Historical Slang" which I ordered on June 29 and still haven't received. I've told the booksellers I will be patient and hope eventually to get my orders.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Oct 25 8:41 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Hollyhock wrote:

Stella, I have a copy and will delve in as soon as I can tear myself away from my zillionth read of the Amelia Peabody Series.


Thanks Hollyhock. No need to rush as I would like to re-read this book; it's a while since I read it and when I got to the end I realised there were important details I had missed.

I look forward to discussing it.



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 249
Date: Oct 25 1:11 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Stella, I have a copy and will delve in as soon as I can tear myself away from my zillionth read of the Amelia Peabody Series.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Oct 15 3:14 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

The following are reviews I came across which might entice some folk here to read 'Cordelia'.

Mr. Graham really cares about his characters and although his major ones may come from stock he can be brilliant with the minor ones. (The Times Literary Supplement, 15 February 1963)

As always, Winston Graham tells a powerful story in masterly style. (Books and Bookmen, June 1963)

The drily desperate conclusion is splendidly managed. (Michael Ratcliffe, The Sunday Times, 3 March 1963)

This novel has shrewd humour and some excellent characterisation (Margaret Willy, The Birmingham Post, 26 February 1963)

Strange and moving A book just right to lose oneself in during these winter evenings. (The Yorkshire Evening News, 16 February 1963)

Enthralling from start to finish. (Marion Lochhead, The Scotsman, 16 February 1963)

Mr Graham is a most careful artist, both in the construction and the writing of his stories This period piece will add to the consideration that now begins to be given to (his) work. (Richard Church, Country Life, 14 March 1963)

a thoughtful, rather slow-moving study of a woman finding her way painfully through a tangle of loves and jealousies. The dialogue is overmodern, but the poverty and prosperity of newly-developing industrial life, the intellectual fireworks of Darwinism, spiritualism [and] free will set the period well. (Celia Dale, Homes and Gardens, June 1963)



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Monday 15th of October 2018 03:16:37 PM

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Oct 11 4:48 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry and any others who may consider reading this book

I have now finished reading this book and shall re-read it sometime soon but only after pausing and thinking it through. It is a story that is full of twists and turns; the reader may think they know what is going on and what will happen but they may be wrong. It demonstrated to me how wide was Winston's talent for story telling. Unfortunately I cannot say more at this stage for fear of spoiling it for anyone else wanting to read it. I hope that others will make it possible to have a discussion about this book.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Oct 4 9:32 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I am about halfway through reading 'Cordelia' and I am really enjoying it. It drew me in from the start unlike 'The Forgotten Story' which takes too long to get going and which I have abandoned for now at least. 'Cordelia' will require a second reading I think but it is not all consuming as the Poldark books are. There are only a few characters to get to know. I cannot say more now in case I spoil it for others who may want to read it. Second hand copies are cheap on Ebay or Abebooks.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Sep 28 8:55 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Stella, I ordered "Cordelia" today from Abe Books. Got a very good copy for $1.71 so can't quibble over that price. Also ordered "The Grove of Eagles" as it appeals to me also. Won't get it untill the end of October though. I wonder if anyone else has read it?


Little Henry - Thank you for letting me know. That's great and a very good price! I too have 'The Grove of Eagles' but have never started it.

Now that your copy of 'Cordelia' is on its way to you, I must continue with my reading of it as I am a slow reader. Already though I can see I shall need to read it at least twice as there is a lot to take in and think about, as always with WG's books.

I am looking forward to discussing these books with you in due course.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Friday 28th of September 2018 09:19:07 AM

__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Sep 28 12:50 AM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Stella, I ordered "Cordelia" today from Abe Books. Got a very good copy for $1.71 so can't quibble over that price. Also ordered "The Grove of Eagles" as it appeals to me also. Won't get it untill the end of October though. I wonder if anyone else has read it?



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Sep 20 9:33 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I'll try that.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Sep 19 10:19 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

I'm in London right now so thought I would have a look in some book stores but not sure if I'll be able to fit it in. Fly home to Canada in 5 days so will check out those sights. I use Abe Books a lot.


What a pity. Can you not buy the edition on Ebay - the one I sent the link to - and have them send it to your address in Canada? It's very cheap.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Sep 19 8:52 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I'm in London right now so thought I would have a look in some book stores but not sure if I'll be able to fit it in. Fly home to Canada in 5 days so will check out those sights. I use Abe Books a lot.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Sep 19 12:26 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry - I have now got further with 'Cordelia' and am enjoying it a great deal. It will re-pay re-reading. It drew me in from the start so I can thoroughly recommend it. I'm not sure where you live but Ebay or Abebooks will have copies and they are not at all expensive.

Here is a link to one on Ebay UKhttps://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cordelia-Winston-Graham-1969-Book-67246/132770576307?hash=item1ee9be37b3:g:KGMAAOSwj4dbkGEY to a very low priced copy

I hope you will be able to get a copy as I would love to be able to discuss this book with you.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Wednesday 19th of September 2018 12:29:39 PM

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Sep 3 5:23 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Little Henry wrote:

Thank you. I have always wondered which "other" WG book to read and it sounds like Cordelia will be it. I shall try to get a copy.


Oh that sounds good. A friend lent me a Fontana copy but the print was too small so I got my Ward Lock from Ebay UK for about 7. I am looking forward to having some interesting conversations.



__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 97
Date: Sep 3 4:21 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Thank you. I have always wondered which "other" WG book to read and it sounds like Cordelia will be it. I shall try to get a copy.



__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Sep 3 1:43 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

I have now read the first seven chapters of this book. It drew me in from the start which contrasts starkly with 'The Forgotten Story" which I finally gave up on but which I may return to. Already I am enjoying it - a book you cannot put down.

Cordelia (first published by Ward Lock n 1949) is, I think, definitely worth reading and I hope others will read it so that I have someone to discuss it with.



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Monday 3rd of September 2018 01:45:05 PM

__________________


Graduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 583
Date: Aug 27 12:13 PM, 2018
Permalink  
 

Ross Poldark wrote:

"Cordelia has all the excellent Victorian ingredients - guilty love, surrender, pathos and comedy. It is enthralling from start to finish. - Scotsman.

"Cordelia lives in an England full of musty tradition and priggishess....but fights to live her life the way she wants it." Books and Bookmen.

"Cordelia is the daughter of a clockmaker who marries the son of a self-made magnate and falls in love with Stephen who runs a music hall. The family prayers, the flare of the gas, the solemn, elaborate meals....this is the real world". - Times Literary Supplement.

* * * *

"Here is a novel in the great storytelling tradition. It has wit, suspense, fine and true characterisations, and a strange and moving love story of a girl with beauty and independence of mind whose rich capacity for love and gaiety was not always in harmony with the traditions of Victorian England.

In October, 1866, Cordelia Blake married Brook Ferguson of Grove Hall. There were three reasons for the marriage, and these were Cordelia's youth, her health, and her good manners - in short Frederick Ferguson's requirements for his son's second wife...."


I am about to start reading this book. In addition to the reviews above, it comes highly recommended from a friend. I hope others might decide to read this so there can be some discussion on the forum.



__________________


Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1774
Date: Jan 26 6:54 PM, 2013
Permalink  
 

"Cordelia has all the excellent Victorian ingredients - guilty love, surrender, pathos and comedy. It is enthralling from start to finish. - Scotsman.

"Cordelia lives in an England full of musty tradition and priggishess....but fights to live her life the way she wants it." Books and Bookmen.

"Cordelia is the daughter of a clockmaker who marries the son of a self-made magnate and falls in love with Stephen who runs a music hall. The family prayers, the flare of the gas, the solemn, elaborate meals....this is the real world". - Times Literary Supplement.

* * * *

"Here is a novel in the great storytelling tradition. It has wit, suspense, fine and true characterisations, and a strange and moving love story of a girl with beauty and independence of mind whose rich capacity for love and gaiety was not always in harmony with the traditions of Victorian England.

In October, 1866, Cordelia Blake married Brook Ferguson of Grove Hall. There were three reasons for the marriage, and these were Cordelia's youth, her health, and her good manners - in short Frederick Ferguson's requirements for his son's second wife...."



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.



Administration

Status: Offline
Posts: 1774
Date: Sep 9 11:41 AM, 2004
Permalink  
 

15. Cordelia - 1949.



__________________

"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.