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Post Info TOPIC: Old & Modern English Phrases & Expressions


Initiate

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Date: Jul 24 10:35 AM, 2018
RE: Old & Modern English Phrases & Expressions
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OK, so here is another shot:

An Old Irish wordtrŠig,†which apparently can mean "ebb-tide" as well as, figuratively, "exhaustion" (http://edil.qub.ac.uk/41572).

If that's where WG's "trike" came from, then the prostitute would essentially be accusing Ross of having finished before they even got started.
This explanation might also be in keeping with the next part of the conversation between Ross and Demelza, when she is initially unsure what the word means (to be perfectly honest, though, I'm not entirely sure there whether Demelza's confusion is more about "trike" or "impotence" - but I'll go with the former for the sake of the argument) but in the end makes the connection. I mean, if the word has Gaelic roots, perhaps Demelza knew the literal meaning, but took some time to figure out what the insult was?


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Initiate

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Date: Jul 23 12:50 PM, 2018
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Yep, that's clearly a downside... Meant to check/caveat this, but got overexcited about the discovery & forgot Looks like I've got to keep looking, then!

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Graduate

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Date: Jul 23 12:35 PM, 2018
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Except it wasn't identified until the 1830s.



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Initiate

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Date: Jul 23 10:37 AM, 2018
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Et voila - some more internet searching later, I find this:

Trichomoniasis (or trich) is a very common sexually transmitted disease. Having trichomoniasis can make it feel unpleasant to have sex.

https://www.cdc.gov/std/trichomonas/stdfact-trichomoniasis.htm

Sounds like a pretty good match to me.



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Initiate

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Date: Jul 22 11:07 PM, 2018
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Wait, but wouldn't Ross's account of the encounter - "They left shouting derisory curses at my head. One accused me of impotence, the other called me a trike." - suggest two different meanings? Or is it just WG playing tricks on the reader?

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Graduate

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Date: Jul 22 3:35 AM, 2018
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Oh, that makes sense. Thanks. I binge-watched "Harlots," hoping to hear "trike" used in context so I could find out, but no luck. But I did enjoy the series so my time wasn't wasted.†



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Date: Jul 21 6:25 PM, 2018
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I believe 'Trike' was a word used for impotence.† No wonder Ross was insulted!

In the 18th Century it was quite common for people to add an 'a' to the beginning of words; ie. abed, amiss, adoing, awalking etc.

I like the phrase, 'What's to do?'† We also use the word 'betimes' in our family, meaning early.†

WG is†excellent at striking a balance with 18th century idiom and what was current when he wrote the books.† Very little jars and it is surprising how many sentences are similar to the writing of Austen and Mrs Gaskell. I think he may have benefitted from having parents who were born less than a century after the 'Poldark period'.†



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Date: Jul 14 4:54 AM, 2018
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Mini,

Thanks for the tip. The book arrived yesterday.

I immediately looked up "trike," the name the rejected prostitute called Ross when he turned her out of his room, but the only definition listed was "tricycle." Sigh. From what Ross said, I assumed it meant "homosexual," but I was curious about the origin.†



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Date: Jul 11 11:47 AM, 2018
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Stella Poldark wrote:
I like the term "abed" although I wonder if it was used by the landed gentry, and Demelza's phrase of "betwixt and between".

Thinking about it again - I'm not so sure about "abed", but I do find Winston Graham's way of expressing desire between Ross and Demelza extremely sexy, e.g. Ross's "I want you" or "Let me have you", as well as Demelza's "Don't take me if you h-hate me". Whenever I come across these lines, I feel like I'd happily swap all the modern gender equality for any one of them!



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Date: Jun 29 7:21 AM, 2018
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Mini wrote:

Eric Partridge, "The Penguin Dictionary Of Historical Slang", ISBN 10: 014051046X / ISBN 13: 9780140510461, Published by Penguin, London, 1972. Abridged by Jacqueline Simpson.

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=1428812889&searchurl=sortby%3D17%26an%3Deric%2Bpatridge&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title1

I love slang and euphemisms, etc. and I have a small collection of books on the subject which I dip into now and then for enjoyment. Partridge's book is the most comprehensive one I've found.


†Mini - Thanks for this information but I have already ordered from Amazon UK.



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Date: Jun 28 11:50 PM, 2018
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Eric Partridge, "The Penguin Dictionary Of Historical Slang", ISBN 10: 014051046X / ISBN 13: 9780140510461, Published by Penguin, London, 1972. Abridged by Jacqueline Simpson.

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=1428812889&searchurl=sortby%3D17%26an%3Deric%2Bpatridge&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title1

I love slang and euphemisms, etc. and I have a small collection of books on the subject which I dip into now and then for enjoyment. Partridge's book is the most comprehensive one I've found.



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Date: Jun 28 2:53 PM, 2018
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Mini wrote:

The Penguin Dictionary Of Historical Slang (one of my favourite reads!) gives 'betwixt and between' as colloquial from about 1830.


†Mini - I would love to read this book but cannot find it. Can you post the ISBN number please with the publisher?



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Date: Jun 28 2:48 AM, 2018
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The Penguin Dictionary Of Historical Slang (one of my favourite reads!) gives 'betwixt and between' as colloquial from about 1830.



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Initiate

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Date: Jun 28 12:30 AM, 2018
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It's nice to know I'm not alone in it, Stella

I do like "betwixt and between" a lot, too. How surprised I was when I recently saw this phrase used in a footbal world cup commentary! Do you happen to write any of these?



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Date: Jun 22 10:42 PM, 2018
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Blackleburr wrote:

On phrases and expressions, I was wondering what your thoughts are on some of the lines used frequently in the TV series but not so much in the books (or at least I don't recall them as featuring prominently in the books). Two examples I had in mind are:

1. "What's amiss? / Is something amiss?" - It seems to be used quite often by different characters, both high and low class, in the series. So often, in fact, that I almost started using it in everyday conversation, too... (but then, it's possible that I have simply been watching Poldark too much).

2. Ross's signature: "Try me!" - I don't think he ever says these words exactly in the books - but the phrase suits him quite well on TV.

Do you know how period accurate these expressions are? Would you like them being used less/more?


†Blackleburr - I love the phrase "Is something amiss?" as it sounds right for that time and I, too, find myself on the verge of using it myself. In contrast "Try me" sounds very modern and doesn't sound at all right for that time.†

I like the term "abed" although I wonder if it was used by the landed gentry, and Demelza's phrase of "betwixt and between".



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Initiate

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Date: Jun 22 10:09 PM, 2018
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On phrases and expressions, I was wondering what your thoughts are on some of the lines used frequently in the TV series but not so much in the books (or at least I don't recall them as featuring prominently in the books). Two examples I had in mind are:

1. "What's amiss? / Is something amiss?" - It seems to be used quite often by different characters, both high and low class, in the series. So often, in fact, that I almost started using it in everyday conversation, too... (but then, it's possible that I have simply been watching Poldark too much).

2. Ross's signature: "Try me!" - I don't think he ever says these words exactly in the books - but the phrase suits him quite well on TV.

Do you know how period accurate these expressions are? Would you like them being used less/more?



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Administration

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Date: Jun 20 5:38 PM, 2018
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"Having The Wobblies" is much the same as having a moment though I don't think it's in the books, however I'm sure Jud and Prudie and several other rich Sawle characters said quite a few as WG was fond of using them frequently. Demelza included.....



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Administration

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Date: Jun 20 5:21 PM, 2018
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Old & Modern English Phrases & Expressions....



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

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