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Post Info TOPIC: Artificial grass at Tehidy in the 1790s? Did Francis Basset have a time machine?


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Date: May 6 9:10 AM, 2018
Artificial grass at Tehidy in the 1790s? Did Francis Basset have a time machine?
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Oops, it looks like I posted that twice. I deleted it the first time after getting a message that the web connection had been broken. Sorry.



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Sunday 6th of May 2018 09:13:51 AM

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Graduate

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Date: May 6 9:08 AM, 2018
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I think Francis Bassett was experimenting with different lays (types of grass) that would grow on the poor and contaminated soils surrounding mining country.  Any grass sown for a specific reason is 'artificial' as opposed to seed which blows and propagates naturally.  There was also much experimentation with fertilisers of different types - seaweed, bone-meal and so on around that time - anything to improve crops of both cereal and hay.  Bassett was known as in innovator in farming methods.


 What did Churchill say, "two countries divided by a common language"? Here in the U.S., we don't define "artificial" that way in terms of agriculture. 



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Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

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Date: Apr 30 7:34 PM, 2018
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I think Francis Bassett was experimenting with different lays (types of grass) that would grow on the poor and contaminated soils surrounding mining country.  Any grass sown for a specific reason is 'artificial' as opposed to seed which blows and propagates naturally.  There was also much experimentation with fertilisers of different types - seaweed, bone-meal and so on around that time - anything to improve crops of both cereal and hay.  Bassett was known as in innovator in farming methods.



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Date: Apr 30 5:55 PM, 2018
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Ah ha, the meadows are "artificial," but the grass that creates them is real. That makes much more sense. Thanks!



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Newbie

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Date: Apr 28 5:02 PM, 2018
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"Meadow making may be defined as a method of producing an artificial cover of perennial grass on the soil surface by means of soil management and perennial grass sowing ... Accelerated meadow making, involving the sowing of perennial grasses in prepared soil, is used to create artificial grass cover on ploughland or degraded, eroded or erosion-prone other land ..." (Ref: Agricultural Land Improvement: Amelioration and Reclamation : Volume II, edited by Boris Stepanovich Maslov)

In other words, it is a method of improving poorly producing or inferior ground into a meadow of "artificial" (i.e. not naturally seeded) grass.



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Graduate

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Date: Apr 26 10:43 AM, 2018
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 Does anyone have any idea what Francis Basset meant by "artificial grass" in this sentence from Page 92 of "The Four Swans"?


"I intend to try some experimental crops - turnips, cabbage, artificial grass - things not yet known in this part of the country, so that the farmers in the neighbourhood may see what answers best without going to personal expense."

  • To my knowledge the first artificial grass was developed in the 1960s, but it was made of petroleum products so it was manufactured, not grown.
  • Could he have been talking about ornamental ground-covers, such as dichondra (aka ponyfoot)? It  was grown as a grass substitute in California in the 1950s and '60s, but it was difficult to maintain so it went out of fashion. But that doesn't seem like something 18th-century farmers would have any interest in growing. Lawns would not have been a priority for them, would they? 
  • Or could he have been talking about Bermuda grass? It seems unlikely because it is a real grass, even if it is not one naturally found in the British Isles. Then again, it would be a useful crop for farmers. It is suitable both for grazing and for hay. But is Cornwall's climate mild enough to make growing it even possible? 


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