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Post Info TOPIC: Scenes we wish WG had followed up on


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Date: May 3 11:28 PM, 2018
RE: Scenes we wish WG had followed up on
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I have just finished re-reading "The Four Swans" and would have liked to have more said after Ross reads the poem from Demelza's pocket.  Later in the book when Ross goes to Truro he doesn't even tell D that he is going for the election.  Did he even tell D that he had accepted Lord Falmouth's offer to run for Parliament?  I really felt the depth of their feelings in this re-reading, especially Ross'.  The silence between them was profound.  Demelza always cared so much about other people's feelings yet now she seems oblivious to how she is making Ross feel.  I would have liked to know more about her feelings.  Also, what would their leave-taking have been like when Ross went to London.  On now to "The Angry Tide".  I never noticed before that the opening paragraph and part of the 2nd paragraph is absolutely identical to the opening of Chapter 1 of "Ross Poldark".  Emphasizes Ross's musings on the repetitiveness of his life but I wonder how many people noticed it.  Or am I the last to know?



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Hollyhock wrote:  

Moorland Rambler I agree. It was odd that Demelza thought to discourage Armitage by getting tipsy and acting unladylike. Since Armitage was a debaucher and an ingrate, Demelza's performance would only have inflamed him, and a few other gents as well. She found it remarkably easy to put her fear about being viewed as a miner's brat on hold. Wonder if others were embarrassed for Ross at her immodest conduct; Caroline was certainly concerned.  

Now if she had really wanted to put Armitage off, she should have pretended to be a Wesleyan and, like Sam, fervently quoted bible verses. That would have sent a miscreant like him running. Instead, her behavior probably assured Armitage that cuckolding Ross would be easy. Demelza pretty much confirmed this a little later when she confessed to Ross her desire to run off with Hugh and have a special beach day. 

Dark Mare wrote:  

it seems to me that she expected Armitage to have the same issue with intoxicated women that Ross did. Otherwise she wouldn't have done it if she was trying make him like her less. It's also possible that she counted on Lord Falmouth and his sister, Mrs. Gower, to be put off by her conduct and to tell him that she was an unsuitable friend for him.

Actually, it has always struck me as strange that there is no evidence that they ever suggested he was behaving inappropriately toward her. It seems odd to me that a man whose fidelity to his wife extended beyond the grave wouldn't feel uncomfortable enough about his nephew paying excessive attention to the wife of a man he was trying to lure into politics to do something or at least say something to rein in the young man. Each time the Poldarks visited, he whisked Ross off for a private chat, giving Hugh an opportunity to monopolize Demelza. Was he really unaware of this? Did his sister really not notice this and say something to him? Successful politicians don't let their relatives offend people they are trying to form alliances with. 

________________________________________________________________

How could Mrs. Gower either overlook or fail to recognise Armitage's over familiarity with Demelza? I suspect that it was a combination of over fondness for her favourite nephew and inflated respect for the wife of the man who saved her nephew's life. Maybe Mrs. Gower thought that he was just paying Demelza the compliments due to her because of her husband's heroic exploits at Quimper prison. There is no doubt in my mind that Armitage used the Demelza/Mrs Gower relationship to further his carefully laid plans to overcome Demelza's resistance. The invitation from Ross to visit Great Seal Hole and stay at Nampara was for Mrs. Gower and the children, not Armitage (Armitage saying he had never seen a seal was one of his obvious lies.) When he finally turns up at Nampara without Mrs. Gower and the children he fabricates yet another falsehood about them being unable to come in order that the chance to see Demelza alone might be achieved. That 'Bird of Opportunity' that Demelza mused about so fervently was designed and built by Armitage from beginning to end.

As for Lord Falmouth, the amorous adventures of young aristocratic relatives would be low down on his list of priorities. After all he probably did exactly the same in his own youth, it was almost expected. Also, the fact that Ross never looked too bothered about it didn't help either.

However, there must have been gossip from the household servants, not just observing Armitage's behaviour but being complicit in his conveyance of secret letters etc. His groom in particular must have known what was going on. One scene WG could have added was the discussion between the groom and Armitage on the way back from Nampara on that hot June afternoon. On second thoughts it might possibly just have been more bouts of boasting in the same vein as he had boasted with Demelza just minutes before or in the way he was boasting at the dinner table a few weeks later. I doubt very much that an egotist like Armitage could keep quiet about his conquest as he had promised Demelza. Anyway servants don't count do they? Servants' talk did get around and between the big houses so it was quite probable that more people knew about their illicit encounter than Demelza ever realised.

 



-- Edited by Moorland Rambler on Thursday 26th of April 2018 07:36:07 PM

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it seems to me that she expected Armitage to have the same issue with intoxicated women that Ross did. Otherwise she wouldn't have done it if she was trying make him like her less. It's also possible that she counted on Lord Falmouth and his sister, Mrs. Gower, to be put off by her conduct and to tell him that she was an unsuitable friend for him.

Actually, it has always struck me as strange that there is no evidence that they ever suggested he was behaving inappropriately toward her. It seems odd to me that a man whose fidelity to his wife extended beyond the grave wouldn't feel uncomfortable enough about his nephew paying excessive attention to the wife of a man he was trying to lure into politics to do something or at least say something to rein in the young man. Each time the Poldarks visited, he whisked Ross off for a private chat, giving Hugh an opportunity to monopolize Demelza. Was he really unaware of this? Did his sister really not notice this and say something to him? Successful politicians don't let their relatives offend people they are trying to form alliances with. 



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Moorland Rambler wrote:  

Whatever type of drunk she may have pretended to be, Demelza's attempt to convince Armitage that she was a drinker and and an unworthy woman was obviously only half-hearted judging by her collusion with him during their fond farewells the very next day. Not only did she allow him to 'make love' to her with only the faintest resistance but also tacitly agreed to receive his love poems secretly whilst he was at sea. In less than twelve hours she had gone from trying to put him off to deliberately deceiving her husband by accepting clandestine love letters. Her descent into unworthiness began that day and was completed the following year at Great Seal Hole.

Perhaps that was partly why she was in such a sullen drunken stupor so many years later (The Loving Cup - Book 3 Ch 2 - iv.) Not just contemplating the consequences of her eldest son's highway robbery, but also considering the results of the other great mistakes of her life. She talks to Ross about her guilty feelings over the death of their first born child. Perhaps she was also thinking about how foolishly deluded she had been in being so captivated by Armitage's protestations of love. 

She may have been brooding over how much better Jeremy and Clowance might have turned out if she had concentrated on their needs during that important formative period of their lives, rather than mooning about that young naval lieutenant. I still can't forgive her irresponsibility for the unseemly way her children were playing on the beach whilst she was around the next cove indulging in some early morning passion. I wonder what her first thoughts and words to Jeremy were when she got back and he asked her who that man was and what had they been doing!

I've just been reading an extract from a recently published local history book.  It contains an account of a man named Spence Broughton who robbed the Rotherham mail coach in 1791 (Rotherham is near Sheffield, Yorkshire.) He was arrested and hanged in 1792 and his body 'gibbeted' (ie 'suspended between heaven and earth') on the local common. Apparently over 40,000 people turned up to see the body. It continued to hang there for thirty six years. There is a pub called the 'Noose and Gibbet' close by the spot today.

No wonder Demelza was feeling morose and took to the bottle. Jeremy could have ended his life as an exhibit of shame and horror. Instead he became a war hero!

 

Moorland Rambler I agree. It was odd that Demelza thought to discourage Armitage by getting tipsy and acting unladylike. Since Armitage was a debaucher and an ingrate, Demelza's performance would only have inflamed him, and a few other gents as well. She found it remarkably easy to put her fear about being viewed as a miner's brat on hold. Wonder if others were embarrassed for Ross at her immodest conduct; Caroline was certainly concerned.  

Now if she had really wanted to put Armitage off, she should have pretended to be a Wesleyan and, like Sam, fervently quoted bible verses. That would have sent a miscreant like him running. Instead, her behavior probably assured Armitage that cuckolding Ross would be easyDemelza pretty much confirmed this a little later when she confessed to Ross her desire to run off with Hugh and have a special beach day. 

 

 

 



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Dark Mare wrote:
Pollie wrote:

 

I wished he followed up on the scene at the Tregothnan party where Demelza conspired to drink too much port causing her to act more feeling and less proper than she would i order to turn Armitage off her. The story jumps to Demelza feeling quite depressed back home with Ross in their bedroom and nothing about whether her plan worked , what inappropriate things she might have said and done and the impact on Armitage or on others. 

Thinking about it, Demelza was always nervous and worried about acting right when at  these society parties, so it is quite significant that she took this step i the first place. We have been deprived about how this all went down and I suspect it probably had the opposite effect. 


 Me, too. I imagine Demelza was a kittenish drunk that night, ą la Tracy Lord (Katharine Hepburn) in "The Philadelphia Story," which would explain why her plan failed. I can't imagine her being a nasty drunk or a dance-on-the-table or swing-from-the-chandelier one. Maybe a self-conscious and self-controlled one whose oh-so-precise speech and movements are the only giveaways. She was a maudlin one in one of the later books and Ross nearly pitched her out of the house -- nice guy, isn't he?


Whatever type of drunk she may have pretended to be, Demelza's attempt to convince Armitage that she was a drinker and and an unworthy woman was obviously only half-hearted judging by her collusion with him during their fond farewells the very next day. Not only did she allow him to 'make love' to her with only the faintest resistance but also tacitly agreed to receive his love poems secretly whilst he was at sea. In less than twelve hours she had gone from trying to put him off to deliberately deceiving her husband by accepting clandestine love letters. Her descent into unworthiness began that day and was completed the following year at Great Seal Hole.

Perhaps that was partly why she was in such a sullen drunken stupor so many years later (The Loving Cup - Book 3 Ch 2 - iv.) Not just contemplating the consequences of her eldest son's highway robbery, but also considering the results of the other great mistakes of her life. She talks to Ross about her guilty feelings over the death of their first born child. Perhaps she was also thinking about how foolishly deluded she had been in being so captivated by Armitage's protestations of love. 

She may have been brooding over how much better Jeremy and Clowance might have turned out if she had concentrated on their needs during that important formative period of their lives, rather than mooning about that young naval lieutenant. I still can't forgive her irresponsibility for the unseemly way her children were playing on the beach whilst she was around the next cove indulging in some early morning passion. I wonder what her first thoughts and words to Jeremy were when she got back and he asked her who that man was and what had they been doing!

I've just been reading an extract from a recently published local history book.  It contains an account of a man named Spence Broughton who robbed the Rotherham mail coach in 1791 (Rotherham is near Sheffield, Yorkshire.) He was arrested and hanged in 1792 and his body 'gibbeted' (ie 'suspended between heaven and earth') on the local common. Apparently over 40,000 people turned up to see the body. It continued to hang there for thirty six years. There is a pub called the 'Noose and Gibbet' close by the spot today.

No wonder Demelza was feeling morose and took to the bottle. Jeremy could have ended his life as an exhibit of shame and horror. Instead he became a war hero!

 



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Ross Poldark wrote:

During the invasion of Portugal (1807), the Portuguese royal family fled to Brazil, establishing Rio de Janeiro as the de facto capital of Portugal. This had the side effect of creating within Brazil many of the institutions required to exist as an independent state; most importantly, it freed Brazil to trade (bingo!) with other nations at will.

After Napoleon's army was finally defeated in 1815, in order to maintain the capital in Brazil and allay Brazilian fears of being returned to colonial status, King John VI of Portugal raised the de jure status of Brazil to an equal, integral part of a United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and the Algarves, rather than a mere colony, a status which it enjoyed for the next seven years.

(What happened after seven years? A war of independence that the Brazilians won.)

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Very interesting and makes a lot of sense now thanks, consequently it would have been interesting if WG had followed up on what happened there in more detail and any possible repercussions in the Palace and Whitehall once Ross had returned.


 I agree. I understand his reason for the time leap between "The Angry Tide" and "The Stranger From the Sea," but I wish he had written a book or two to close the gap that focused on the wider world. If nothing else, we would know how much of Ross' denigrating his contributions to those foreign missions was false modesty. If I had been Jeremy hearing him talk about those missions in that way, I would have started to think he was taking on any fool's errand that came his way to avoid coming home because he didn't really like being a parent -- or a husband, perhaps. 



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During the invasion of Portugal (1807), the Portuguese royal family fled to Brazil, establishing Rio de Janeiro as the de facto capital of Portugal. This had the side effect of creating within Brazil many of the institutions required to exist as an independent state; most importantly, it freed Brazil to trade (bingo!) with other nations at will.

After Napoleon's army was finally defeated in 1815, in order to maintain the capital in Brazil and allay Brazilian fears of being returned to colonial status, King John VI of Portugal raised the de jure status of Brazil to an equal, integral part of a United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and the Algarves, rather than a mere colony, a status which it enjoyed for the next seven years.

(What happened after seven years? A war of independence that the Brazilians won.)

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Very interesting and makes a lot of sense now thanks, consequently it would have been interesting if WG had followed up on what happened there in more detail and any possible repercussions in the Palace and Whitehall once Ross had returned.



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Pollie wrote:

 

I wished he followed up on the scene at the Tregothnan party where Demelza conspired to drink too much port causing her to act more feeling and less proper than she would i order to turn Armitage off her. The story jumps to Demelza feeling quite depressed back home with Ross in their bedroom and nothing about whether her plan worked , what inappropriate things she might have said and done and the impact on Armitage or on others. 

Thinking about it, Demelza was always nervous and worried about acting right when at  these society parties, so it is quite significant that she took this step i the first place. We have been deprived about how this all went down and I suspect it probably had the opposite effect. 


 Me, too. I imagine Demelza was a kittenish drunk that night, ą la Tracy Lord (Katharine Hepburn) in "The Philadelphia Story," which would explain why her plan failed. I can't imagine her being a nasty drunk or a dance-on-the-table or swing-from-the-chandelier one. Maybe a self-conscious and self-controlled one whose oh-so-precise speech and movements are the only giveaways. She was a maudlin one in one of the later books and Ross nearly pitched her out of the house -- nice guy, isn't he?



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Ross Poldark wrote:

 

Also more about Amadora and her family when Geoffrey Charles was in Spain and how he was received into society there her father being a member of the Cortes. But most of all in "Bella" when Ross mentioned to Demelza at the party which included Amadora's parents at Trenwith, momentarily shocking Senora de Bertendona by kissing her much to Demelza's surprise, that he had been part of the delegation to escort the Portuguese royal family from Lisbon to Brazil in '07. Making me wonder whoever ordered him to accompany the royal party, what secret plans WG might have had in mind for him to do once there as the family were simply escaping from the imminent arrival of Napoleon's army otherwise Brazil can't be of that much importance.


 If I hadn't gone to high school and college in California, a former possession of both Spain and Mexico, I wonder whether I would have encountered enough Latin American history to recognize why moving the Portuguese royal family to Brazil would have been a very big deal for the British foreign ministry. 

The period between the end of the American Revolution and about 1830 was marked by a long string of successful revolutions from Mexico to the southern tip of South America. British fingerprints were in evidence in many of the Spanish colonial uprisings for two reasons: 1.) Colonial trade restrictions had heavily favored Spain, meaning helping the rebels evict the Spanish would help British trade interests, which presumably needed help after the recent loss of the American colonies, and 2.) After Napoleon's brother was on the Spanish throne, there was the matter of a war between France/Spain and the U.K./Portugal. 

Presumably, the British foreign ministry would want to know how all these shooting wars going on around the rest of Latin America were affecting the people of Brazil, the largest colony in South America -- and given its current wealth, probably the richest too. Were they likely to catch independence fever too? Or were the Brazilians going to be willing to stick with Portugal? These paragraphs from Wikipedia suggest the Portuguese efforts to win Brazilian hearts and minds created some of the very institutions that positioned Brazil for independence: 

During the invasion of Portugal (1807), the Portuguese royal family fled to Brazil, establishing Rio de Janeiro as the de facto capital of Portugal. This had the side effect of creating within Brazil many of the institutions required to exist as an independent state; most importantly, it freed Brazil to trade (bingo!) with other nations at will.

After Napoleon's army was finally defeated in 1815, in order to maintain the capital in Brazil and allay Brazilian fears of being returned to colonial status, King John VI of Portugal raised the de jure status of Brazil to an equal, integral part of a United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and the Algarves, rather than a mere colony, a status which it enjoyed for the next seven years.

(What happened after seven years? A war of independence that the Brazilians won.) 

 

 



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I wished he followed up on the scene at the Tregothnan party where Demelza conspired to drink too much port causing her to act more feeling and less proper than she would i order to turn Armitage off her. The story jumps to Demelza feeling quite depressed back home with Ross in their bedroom and nothing about whether her plan worked , what inappropriate things she might have said and done and the impact on Armitage or on others. 

Thinking about it, Demelza was always nervous and worried about acting right when at  these society parties, so it is quite significant that she took this step i the first place. We have been deprived about how this all went down and I suspect it probably had the opposite effect. 



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Interesting thread and responses....

Not so much scenes more areas of interest that would have been interesting to learn more about were some of the shadier goings on at Sally Chill-offs, also Sally herself and her locals. Also the men and women from nearby villages would have been interesting as well, briefly illustrated after the fight with the men from Illoggan when Jud had wonderfully embellished everything that had happened. "Jesus was a St. Austell man" on another occasion still making me laugh even after so long !

Also more about Amadora and her family when Geoffrey Charles was in Spain and how he was received into society there her father being a member of the Cortes. But most of all in "Bella" when Ross mentioned to Demelza at the party which included Amadora's parents at Trenwith, momentarily shocking Senora de Bertendona by kissing her much to Demelza's surprise, that he had been part of the delegation to escort the Portuguese royal family from Lisbon to Brazil in '07. Making me wonder whoever ordered him to accompany the royal party, what secret plans WG might have had in mind for him to do once there as the family were simply escaping from the imminent arrival of Napoleon's army otherwise Brazil can't be of that much importance.



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Good choice. I like that scene because it shows how Demelza's mind works. She is more than a matchmaker; she's a casting director. Poor Ross, he's playing checkers and she's playing 3-D chess.



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I would have liked to have seen Tom Guildford reappear on the scene in 'Bella Poldark,' but even though this was signalled at the end of 'The Twisted Sword' he never appeared again.

In the penultimate chapter of 'The Twisted Sword' when Ross and Demelza are riding on the beach, this conversation takes place:-

Demelza said: 'I must send word to Clowance and Verity. (about the birth of Cuby's daughter) I am sure they will be anxious to know.'

 'I'm sure they will.'

'Ross, I have been wondering about Valentine and Selina in London.'

 'What could you be wondering about them?'

'Whether they may see Tom Guildford.'

 'You mean? . . . Oh my dear, it is too early to think of anything like that . . .'

 'I do not think of anything like that! But Tom is a good kind friend of Clowance's. If he came down I am sure he would be good for Clowance, good for her spirits, good for her - her health generally. And do not forget, he is a lawyer. He could be a great business help to her too.'

Ross said: 'In that case perhaps we should send a note to Edward Fitzmaurice so the two gentlemen may start from scratch.'

 'Ross, you are so vexatious! Why do I bear with you?'

'Well, you said she told you that if she ever married again it would not be for love, it would be for money or position. That would bring Edward strongly into the reckoning.'

'I do not know how you can be so cynical about your own daughter.'

'Is it cynical to face the facts? If Cuby is damaged, so in a similar but different way is Clowance. So we should do nothing, should we, and allow events to take their course?'

Demelza mentions Tom to Ross at the end of 'The Twisted Sword' but that is the last we hear of him. It seems odd that this mention of him is not a precursor to his return to the story. 

Earlier in 'The Twisted Sword,' on the ride back with Clowance from Valentine's home to Penrhyn (which she enjoyed so much,) Tom urged her to meet up with him at least twice per year to keep their friendship going. 

To separate they did not dismount, but Tom somehow manoeuvred his horse into a proximity that enabled him to give Clowance a smacking kiss. Clowance nearly lost her hat. She said: 'Tom, you are nice. It has been good to meet you again.'

 'Let us make this a twice yearly assignation. It will keep our friendship warm.'

Tom was a much closer 'kindred spirit' to Clowance than either Lord Edward Fitzmaurice or Philip Prideaux. I would liked to have seen him come back to woo her, having not married but waited and remained true to Clowance as he once had promised. I am sure she would have warmed to him much more quickly than her other two suitors and might even have been able to share her burdensome memories eventually. Even though Tom was a friend of Valentine, his liveliness usually stayed on the straight and narrow and I agree with Demelza that he would have been the tonic that Clowance needed despite her avowal to marry again only for wealth and position. I can't help thinking that, despite being surrounded by opulence and the kindness of Lord Edward, Clowance would have to endure a bleak future emotionally.

 



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Dark Mare wrote:
Are there any scenes in the Poldark books that suggest others that you wish WG had written? I have a few, but one stands way above all the others:
 
This scene from "The Four Swans" has Demelza wondering what it is about her that gets men to treat her the way they do. She is seated beside an elderly general who has taken the opportunity to explore her thigh with a sweaty palm, damaging her dress. She asks herself why men do these things to her and comes up with four possible reasons. The fourth is all men do this sort of thing to all women, and she resolves to ask Ross "how often he squeezes women's legs under the dinner table."
 
Oh WG, how could you leave that to my imagination? Oh Debbie Horsfield, why didn't you take a crack at it? Imagine the "spit take" Aidan Turner might have done when Demelza asked that question. 
 
 
Page 78, "The Four Swans" 

By the time they sat down it was three oclock. Demelza was opposite Lieutenant Armitage and between Dwight and General Macarmick. The latter, in spite of being elderly, was cheerful and outgoing, a man with a lot of opinions and no lack of the will to voice them. He had at one time been Member of Parliament for Truro, had raised a regiment for the West Indies and had made a fortune for himself in the wine trade. He was polite and charming to everyone, but in between courses when his hands were not engaged, he repeatedly felt Demelzas leg above the knee. 
 
She sometimes wondered what there was about herself that made men so forthcoming. In those early days when she had gone to various receptions and balls, she had always had them two or three deep asking for the next dance - and often for more besides. Sir Hugh Bodrugan still lumbered over to Nampara hopefully a couple of times a year, presumably expecting that sooner or later persistence would have its reward. Two years ago at that dinner party at Trelissick there had been that Frenchman who had larded his entire dinner conversation with improper suggestions. It didnt seem right. 
 
If she had known herself to be supremely beautiful or striking - as beautiful, for instance, as Elizabeth Warleggan, or as striking as Caroline Enys - it might have been more acceptable. Instead of that she was just friendly, and they took it the wrong way. Or else they sensed something particularly female about her that set them off. Or else because of her lack of breeding, they thought she would be easy game. Or else it happened to everybody. She must ask Ross how often he squeezed womens legs under the dinner table. 
 
... Demelza was relieved when dinner broke up. Not that she so much minded General Macarmicks intimacies, but his hand was growing progressively hotter, and she 
was afraid for her frock. Sure enough when she was able to look at herself upstairs, there were grease stains.

 



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Sunday 1st of April 2018 12:44:11 AM


 Dark Mare - I recall there are many scenes that I wish WG had taken us further with instead of leaving us to wonder about but I shall need to refresh my memory. One that springs to mind is that I wish he could have written something (not everything) about how Ross and Elizabeth separately felt about their tryst on the night of May 9th.



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Are there any scenes in the Poldark books that suggest others that you wish WG had written? I have a few, but one stands way above all the others:
 
This scene from "The Four Swans" has Demelza wondering what it is about her that gets men to treat her the way they do. She is seated beside an elderly general who has taken the opportunity to explore her thigh with a sweaty palm, damaging her dress. She asks herself why men do these things to her and comes up with four possible reasons. The fourth is all men do this sort of thing to all women, and she resolves to ask Ross "how often he squeezes women's legs under the dinner table."
 
Oh WG, how could you leave that to my imagination? Oh Debbie Horsfield, why didn't you take a crack at it? Imagine the "spit take" Aidan Turner might have done when Demelza asked that question. 
 
 
Page 78, "The Four Swans" 

By the time they sat down it was three oclock. Demelza was opposite Lieutenant Armitage and between Dwight and General Macarmick. The latter, in spite of being elderly, was cheerful and outgoing, a man with a lot of opinions and no lack of the will to voice them. He had at one time been Member of Parliament for Truro, had raised a regiment for the West Indies and had made a fortune for himself in the wine trade. He was polite and charming to everyone, but in between courses when his hands were not engaged, he repeatedly felt Demelzas leg above the knee. 
 
She sometimes wondered what there was about herself that made men so forthcoming. In those early days when she had gone to various receptions and balls, she had always had them two or three deep asking for the next dance - and often for more besides. Sir Hugh Bodrugan still lumbered over to Nampara hopefully a couple of times a year, presumably expecting that sooner or later persistence would have its reward. Two years ago at that dinner party at Trelissick there had been that Frenchman who had larded his entire dinner conversation with improper suggestions. It didnt seem right. 
 
If she had known herself to be supremely beautiful or striking - as beautiful, for instance, as Elizabeth Warleggan, or as striking as Caroline Enys - it might have been more acceptable. Instead of that she was just friendly, and they took it the wrong way. Or else they sensed something particularly female about her that set them off. Or else because of her lack of breeding, they thought she would be easy game. Or else it happened to everybody. She must ask Ross how often he squeezed womens legs under the dinner table. 
 
... Demelza was relieved when dinner broke up. Not that she so much minded General Macarmicks intimacies, but his hand was growing progressively hotter, and she 
was afraid for her frock. Sure enough when she was able to look at herself upstairs, there were grease stains.

 



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Sunday 1st of April 2018 12:44:11 AM

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