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Post Info TOPIC: Film based on Stranger from the Sea


Student

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Date: Mar 18 2:19 AM, 2018
RE: Film based on Stranger from the Sea
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Dark Mare wrote:
Fijane wrote:

It is also possible that they could shorten the gap a little, creating new storylines that weave the hints of events in those ten years with a plan to meet up with TSFTS maybe halfway through the series. They could start in about 1807-08, and flesh out Jeremy and Clowance's teen years. A gap of seven years doesn't feel anywhere near as long as ten.


 Actually, there are enough events that occurred during those 10 years that are described in the subsequent books to fill the gap if it is carefully done. Geoffrey Charles' switch from Harrow to the military academy and his subsequent adventures and financial crises. Bella's birth in, what, 1802? Ross' various diplomatic missions. Drake's switch from his shop to the shipyard in Looe. The then-10-year-old Jeremy's life-changing visit to Tehidy, where he first saw a steam-propelled vehicle. George's mother trying to raise Ursula and Valentine, and George's feeble efforts at fatherhood. It is unfortunate that they pruned Elizabeth's parents from the cast because their presence was the only reason Trenwith was maintained for the first part of the decade, and Jonathan Chynoweth's funeral was something of a place marker. It is mentioned often in the later books as the last time several characters saw each other or were at Trenwith, etc. Nampara scenes would have to be limited because it require too many child actors to get Jeremy and Clowance from grade schoolers to teens and Bella from birth to 8 years old. Demelza could be kept in the picture with her involvement with the mine and with scenes with Dwight and Caroline. 

One thing I hope they would attempt is Elizabeth's funeral, even though WG didn't write about it that I can recall. Did Ross and Demelza attend or had Ross already left for London? Were Morwenna and Drake there? Was Valentine present (he would have been awfully young for it, but it was his mother's funeral) and did Ross meet him? Was George civil? 


 Yes, you are right. So many events were mentioned in hindsight which had later effects. Certainly, Trenwith becomes very important later as the place that Clowance "claims" and then uses as a trysting place, leading to her first encounter with George. (Is it logical that they wouldn't have seen each other at all during the ten years?). Then, it has great importance in Geoffrey Charles' story. And it would be great to see how Jeremy and Ross arrive at the faint discord present in 1810, however I don't trust DH to create that story well.

I have always felt much less attached to Bella, and in the last book I positively dislike her. Maybe if the reader had seen her story from conception/birth, it would be easier to feel engaged with her. As it was, she just appears. She is described as being the most like Demelza, and yet I could never feel that.



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Graduate

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Date: Mar 15 8:21 AM, 2018
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Fijane wrote:

It is also possible that they could shorten the gap a little, creating new storylines that weave the hints of events in those ten years with a plan to meet up with TSFTS maybe halfway through the series. They could start in about 1807-08, and flesh out Jeremy and Clowance's teen years. A gap of seven years doesn't feel anywhere near as long as ten.


 Actually, there are enough events that occurred during those 10 years that are described in the subsequent books to fill the gap if it is carefully done. Geoffrey Charles' switch from Harrow to the military academy and his subsequent adventures and financial crises. Bella's birth in, what, 1802? Ross' various diplomatic missions. Drake's switch from his shop to the shipyard in Looe. The then-10-year-old Jeremy's life-changing visit to Tehidy, where he first saw a steam-propelled vehicle. George's mother trying to raise Ursula and Valentine, and George's feeble efforts at fatherhood. It is unfortunate that they pruned Elizabeth's parents from the cast because their presence was the only reason Trenwith was maintained for the first part of the decade, and Jonathan Chynoweth's funeral was something of a place marker. It is mentioned often in the later books as the last time several characters saw each other or were at Trenwith, etc. Nampara scenes would have to be limited because it require too many child actors to get Jeremy and Clowance from grade schoolers to teens and Bella from birth to 8 years old. Demelza could be kept in the picture with her involvement with the mine and with scenes with Dwight and Caroline. 

One thing I hope they would attempt is Elizabeth's funeral, even though WG didn't write about it that I can recall. Did Ross and Demelza attend or had Ross already left for London? Were Morwenna and Drake there? Was Valentine present (he would have been awfully young for it, but it was his mother's funeral) and did Ross meet him? Was George civil? 



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Student

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Date: Mar 12 7:27 AM, 2018
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It is also possible that they could shorten the gap a little, creating new storylines that weave the hints of events in those ten years with a plan to meet up with TSFTS maybe halfway through the series. They could start in about 1807-08, and flesh out Jeremy and Clowance's teen years. A gap of seven years doesn't feel anywhere near as long as ten.



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Initiate

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Date: Mar 9 8:33 PM, 2018
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I get the feeling that the series will continue and that the stars are hoping it will happen.  I don't see any problem with the aging as Ross and Demelza in the book remain generally youthful, vital, healthy and always attractive.  Besides, being 50 years old is not yet ancient and handsome men are often considered more distinguished looking with a few grey hairs and a few more lines.  I think Aidan and Eleanor have really taken on their characters and would want to play on til the end.  Just like in the first series the audience connected so well with the cast, it just wasn't the same without them in Stranger From the Sea.



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Date: Mar 7 7:26 PM, 2018
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Thanks for that interesting information. I really must acquire a copy of WGs memoirs. How interesting that Robin and Angharad were expected to return in their roles. The actress cast as Clowance was stunning and truly had tapped into her free spirit. Jeremy and Ben Carter were believable too. My issue wasnāt with the casting as such, it was again this deviation from my reading of the original story making key characters angry and aggressive when in the book their relationships are much deeper and more respectful of each other. My vision of Stephen Carrington didnāt match the actor cast at all. He was attractive but not blonde, not muscular enough and he had a northern accent for some reason. In fact they had renamed him with a different surname beginning with C which I donāt recall at present. I wonder why that decision was taken? I really donāt believe the current adaptation will go much further. My instinct is that Aidan and Eleanor wonāt want to play the more elderly characters. I hope Iām wrong but the 10 year break I think, will provide a natural end to the current series.

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Fan

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Date: Mar 7 4:34 PM, 2018
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Nampara breeze wrote:

I recently recorded a film on the True Movies channel (who knew?) after being intrigued that it was titled Poldark. It turned out to be a 2 Hour long 1995 film version of The Stranger from the Sea starring some familiar faces from my much younger days in the main parts which I recognised but could never have named. It was made by HTV as a pilot I believe, which was never developed. The characterisation was very different from the books in parts ( Maybe this is where Debbie Horsfield got her inspiration for the angst- ridden Demelza!) but what made me smile was the fact that theyād clearly used what appeared to be some of the identical locations as the modern adaptation. Frustratingly, it ended on a cliff hanger, clearly poised for a series to follow which never made it into production. Anyone out there seen or know anything about this film and itās origins?


I have not watched the film but I have read about it.

Winston Graham writes at length about the film and HTV's aspirations in chapter six of his autobiography 'Memoirs of a Private Man.' You are right to suggest that it was made with an expectation that more would follow. Adaptations of the next three books should have followed but they never materialised. WG obviously had mixed feelings about the whole affair particularly after Angharad Rees and Robin Ellis turned down HTV's terms and other actors were hired instead. He does say some positive things about the film, however, and expresses regret that the HTV enterprise was a failure.

Here is an extract from the end of chapter six in 'Memoirs of a Private Man' summarising WG's thoughts in his own words.

'I have written at some length of the failure of this - possibly - final attempt to put Poldark back on the screen, because it was so widely discussed, so widely written about, and yet with the issues so widely misunderstood. Everyone had a different version of what they thought were the facts. As the one who stood to lose or gain most by this enterprise and who, feeling sympathy and impatience with both sides, yet for the most part I could only stand by and watch the lemmings carefully plotting their own fall. Many of the scenes in the HTV film were magnificent and almost all the acting was of a high standard.

Quite the most important contribution to the failure of Poldark 3, even outweighing the change of cast, was ITV's bull-headedly stupid insistence on a first two-hour film to be made, to ensure it was going to be a success. This had the double-edged disadvantage of an all-or-nothing throw on the one showing. (ITV would certainly have given up if they had taken account of the adverse notices of the first episode of the first series). But also it meant that they had compressed the whole of one Poldark novel into quite a bit less than two hours, while the BBC had allotted four instalments of fifty-five minutes for each of the novels they used. The HTV film had far too much to say in too short a time.

Of course Poldark was so closely and affectionately associated with Robin and Angharad that without them much of the old magic was lacking. But I am pretty sure that, had it been presented in the way the BBC presented it, the public, while hating the changes, would have become absorbed in the progress of Ross and Demelza's children, played as they were by Ioan Gruffudd and Kelly Reilly, and would reluctantly have switched on in increasing numbers as the series went along.'



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Date: Mar 5 8:26 PM, 2018
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I recently recorded a film on the True Movies channel (who knew?) after being intrigued that it was titled Poldark. It turned out to be a 2 Hour long 1995 film version of The Stranger from the Sea starring some familiar faces from my much younger days in the main parts which I recognised but could never have named. It was made by HTV as a pilot I believe, which was never developed. The characterisation was very different from the books in parts ( Maybe this is where Debbie Horsfield got her inspiration for the angst- ridden Demelza!) but what made me smile was the fact that theyād clearly used what appeared to be some of the identical locations as the modern adaptation. Frustratingly, it ended on a cliff hanger, clearly poised for a series to follow which never made it into production. Anyone out there seen or know anything about this film and itās origins?

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