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Post Info TOPIC: Verity & Captain Blamey


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Date: Oct 29 12:39 PM, 2017
RE: Verity & Captain Blamey
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Hollyhock wrote:

Dark Mare,

Thinking about your post, I believe the duel had to end the way it did. So much of the action is based on cause and effect, especially in the early books. So the Trenwith Poldarks could not have accepted Blamey because then Demelza would not have needed to arrange Verity's elopement, which subsequently resulted in so much heartache--Francis' betrayal of Ross' smelting enterprise, the circumstances of baby Julia's death, Ross' trial, and so on.

Even though Charles was selfish and overly preoccupied with his personal comfort, I believe he was fond of Verity and genuinely concerned about her welfare with a man convicted of killing his wife. Any parent would be. Charles wasn't perceptive and he didn't have the capacity to see beyond the gossip and basic facts of Blamey's conviction, so he wasn't able to get a real measure of the man. Ross too was concerned and hesitant about hosting their meetings until he got to know Blamey better. Even then he thought that if something happened to Verity he would never be able to forgive himself.

Interestingly, WG did not share Aunt Agatha's thoughts on the matter.   

 


I agree that the duel ended the way it had to, but Debbie Horsfield's version made the situation more ambiguous and made Blamey a more sympathetic character. He was just unlucky at the most important moment. Winston Graham turned Blamey into the man her family thought he was if only for that moment. I don't think that was fair to either Blamey or Verity. 



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Date: Oct 26 2:50 PM, 2017
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Dark Mare,

Thinking about your post, I believe the duel had to end the way it did. So much of the action is based on cause and effect, especially in the early books. So the Trenwith Poldarks could not have accepted Blamey because then Demelza would not have needed to arrange Verity's elopement, which subsequently resulted in so much heartache--Francis' betrayal of Ross' smelting enterprise, the circumstances of baby Julia's death, Ross' trial, and so on.

Even though Charles was selfish and overly preoccupied with his personal comfort, I believe he was fond of Verity and genuinely concerned about her welfare with a man convicted of killing his wife. Any parent would be. Charles wasn't perceptive and he didn't have the capacity to see beyond the gossip and basic facts of Blamey's conviction, so he wasn't able to get a real measure of the man. Ross too was concerned and hesitant about hosting their meetings until he got to know Blamey better. Even then he thought that if something happened to Verity he would never be able to forgive himself.

Interestingly, WG did not share Aunt Agatha's thoughts on the matter.   

 



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Date: Oct 24 9:27 AM, 2017
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Posted by Dark Mare
Hollyhock wrote:

Hi Dark Mare,

I've sometimes wondered which options WG considered for the outcome of the duel, this and the other more infamous one as well. However, given the intensity of Francis' outrage, do you think he would have allowed Verity to remain with Blamey, even if Blamey had done as you suggested and refused to fire back?


-- Edited by Hollyhock on Tuesday 24th of October 2017 04:00:32 AM


 Hi Hollyhock,

Hmm, good question. The Francis we got to know in "Jeremy Poldark" and "Warleggan," yes, I think so. His failed suicide attempt appeared to change his values and his personality. (Of course, he had shed his personal Iago [George] by then.) But the Francis of "Ross Poldark" and "Demelza," I don't think so. But it wouldn't have been necessary because if Francis had been the only one who had drawn blood that day, Ross and Verity's hand would have been strengthened. Charles' exception to Andrew Blamey could have been challenged for what it really was, a ruse to conceal his real motivation: his unwillingness to let go of Verity. He was determined to keep her at Trenwith and at his beck and call until the day he died, and he made that pretty clear with the comments he made at Francis' engagement party and when she wanted Ross to escort her to that Easter Monday  ball. (The funny thing is, a marriage to Blamey could have been a win-win for both Charles and Verity. The frequent absences caused by Blamey's job would have made Trenwith a logical place for the couple to live, which would have let Charles keep his favorite nursemaid and companion and Verity have the husband and family she desperately wanted without inconveniencing her family.) Would Blamey's past have been considered such a high hurdle if Elizabeth had embraced her role as daughter-in-law with enough enthusiasm and energy to make Verity's presence less necessary? I doubt it.



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Date: Oct 24 9:26 AM, 2017
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Posted by Hollyhock

Hi Dark Mare,

I've sometimes wondered which options WG considered for the outcome of the duel, this and the other more infamous one as well. However, given the intensity of Francis' outrage, do you think he would have allowed Verity to remain with Blamey, even if Blamey had done as you suggested and refused to fire back?

 

 



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



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Date: Oct 24 9:25 AM, 2017
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Posted by Dark Mare

 

Hollyhock wrote:

... Even Verity turned her back on Captain Blamey, the love of her life, because of family expectations. (I actually find Verity's actions more exasperating than Elizabeth's.... 


I think Captain Blamey lost Verity (temporarily) when he fired back at Francis. When the gun was shot out of his right hand, wounding it, Blamey didn't just leave it on the ground. He picked it up with his left hand and fired back at Francis. By doing so, he showed himself to be an irresponsible hothead and gave more credence to her family's objection. He had to know he had less control with his weaker hand so firing anywhere close to Francis would be risking disaster. Verity had already said she would go home with her father so this was the time to show himself to be the bigger man, not to lose his temper. Had Andrew left the gun in the dirt -- or even lifted it in his left hand and fired it into the air if duel etiquette required it -- he would have shown himself to be nothing like what the Trenwith Poldarks thought, giving Verity a chance to change her mind and refuse to leave with her father. Once he'd wounded her brother, she really had no choice but to go home.

We know, of course, that Charles' objection to Blamey had as much -- maybe even more -- to do with not wanting her to marry anyone as with Blamey's history. Charles didn't want her to leave Trenwith because no one else would dote on him as she did. But was Francis also afraid of losing Verity that early in his marriage to Elizabeth? (He was later, of course, when Verity was the convenient buffer between himself and Elizabeth.) 

Debbie Horsfield handled this scene better, making Blamey a victim of circumstance by having Francis' bullet hit Blamey's hand as he was firing so the bullet that hit Francis had not gone where Blamey had intended it to go.



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Date: Oct 24 9:23 AM, 2017
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