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Post Info TOPIC: Minor characters


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Date: Oct 25 5:34 PM, 2017
RE: Minor characters
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Hollyhock wrote:

... Even though we never see her, Meggy Dawes is one of my favorites. Demleza's colorful references to her paint a picture of a woman whose natural medicines are as effective as any of those of the apothecaries. She seems mythical. I sometimes wonder if the Widow Crow who sold Music Thomas the love potion at the Michaelmas Fair was a friend of Meggy's.

 

-- Edited by Hollyhock on Wednesday 25th of October 2017 04:58:38 PM


 I agree. I wish Ross had been more curious about her so there could have been a visit to Illugan to meet her. Or better, she could have been installed in one of the Nampara cottages so Demelza could visit her from time to time.

Then again, would Mrs. Zacky have wanted another midwife around? 



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Date: Oct 25 5:23 PM, 2017
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Hollyhock wrote:

Ah, but would Margaret have liked him? I think not; she was much too shrewd to be bothered by the likes of a Monk Adderley. She would have told him to shoo.

But to keep on topic (really hard!), Margaret's history would be interesting. When she picks Ross up in that inn she is down and out but obviously not common. Where did she come from and how did she end up in a shack on the docks? Did she anger some rich lord's wife by having an open affair with her husband? Next we hear that she is involved with Francis and is on the rise. Then finally at the Bodrugan party we see a successful Margaret and learn a little about how she managed her success. Then she disappears just as suddenly as she appeared.

WG doesn't just sketch his minor female characters; he gives them substance and characteristics that make them memorable--e.g., Char Nanfan, Mrs. Kemp, and especially the formidable Mrs. Zacky.  Even though we never see her, Meggy Dawes is one of my favorites. Demleza's colorful references to her paint a picture of a woman whose natural medicines are as effective as any of those of the apothecaries. She seems mythical. I sometimes wonder if the Widow Crow who sold Music Thomas the love potion at the Michaelmas Fair was a friend of Meggy's.

 

-- Edited by Hollyhock on Wednesday 25th of October 2017 04:58:38 PM


Ah but would Monk shoo willingly? Demelza found Adderley as difficult to get rid of as bubblegum on the bottom of a shoe. (He was much too big to stuff in the freezer to harden his adhesive properties sufficiently to allow him to be scraped off with a razor blade. Though I suppose she could have sprayed him from head to toe with WD-40 to loosen his grip.) Then again, George knew better than to place a 10-to-1 bet that involved Margaret -- she'd worm the details out of the other bettor and agree to comply in exchange for a 60-40 split of the stakes. 



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Date: Oct 25 4:28 PM, 2017
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Ah, but would Margaret have liked him? I think not; she was much too shrewd to be bothered by the likes of a Monk Adderley. She would have told him to shoo.

But to keep on topic (really hard!), Margaret's history would be interesting. When she picks Ross up in that inn she is down and out but obviously not common. Where did she come from and how did she end up in a shack on the docks? Did she anger some rich lord's wife by having an open affair with her husband? Next we hear that she is involved with Francis and is on the rise. Then finally at the Bodrugan party we see a successful Margaret and learn a little about how she managed her success. Then she disappears just as suddenly as she appeared.

WG doesn't just sketch his minor female characters; he gives them substance and characteristics that make them memorable--e.g., Char Nanfan, Mrs. Kemp, and especially the formidable Mrs. Zacky.  Even though we never see her, Meggy Dawes is one of my favorites. Demleza's colorful references to her paint a picture of a woman whose natural medicines are as effective as any of those of the apothecaries. She seems mythical. I sometimes wonder if the Widow Crow who sold Music Thomas the love potion at the Michaelmas Fair was a friend of Meggy's.

 

 



-- Edited by Hollyhock on Wednesday 25th of October 2017 04:58:38 PM

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Date: Oct 24 6:42 PM, 2017
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Hollyhock wrote:

What about the outrageously candid Margaret Cartland Vosper? I don't recall anything being mentioned about her after the Brodrugan ball. Did she continue to marry up? Maybe she worked her way up to a dissolute duke. Despite having to live in a man's world, she knew how to work around the rules and get on. 


 Too bad George didn't invite her to his party for John Robinson. Monk Adderley would have liked her.



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Date: Oct 22 9:29 AM, 2017
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Hoist with your own petard, Ross!

I agree Cuby is an interesting character, but as you have mentioned, she is not minor!  Jeremy certainly didn't think her minor in any way.

Clemency, on the other hand - now what happened to her?  I think she was very much attached to Cuby and Noelle, even more so after Waterloo.  Perhaps she found a gentle man to spend the rest of her life with, maybe the young Boscawen who sang at Caerhays that evening.

 



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Date: Oct 20 9:54 PM, 2017
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I think without doubt for me it's Cuby Trevanion. Right from the start when Jeremy first sees her whilst hiding from the gaugers and contemptously calls him boy there was an instant sense of her strength of character, and I think the moment that he was instantly smitten with her for no-one had ever spoken to him in such a fashion before.

Then her continued constant rejection of him even when she knew who he was which only made him all the more determined to find out what lay behind her strange attitude if he was to progress any further in his suit. Then his uncomfortable introduction to the Trevanions at Caerhays and how John Trevanion despite being hounded by increasing debts seemed to rule everything and everyone with an iron fist, unhappily seeing how much Cuby was under his thumb and beck and call only served to stiffen his resolve to win her round one day come what may.

His occasional tantalising glimpses of her, one in particular at a horse race, always leaves me wondering how Cuby must have felt throughout all this period as unfortunately WG doesn't tell, that is until Jeremy surprised her in her bedroom and all that happened in those tense few minutes as he pleaded for her to run away with him. Then the sudden blinding realisation that she did have feelings after all and desperate to make up couldn't wait to elope with him was so tense and tangible that it felt real, with the shocking finale at the end as she saw Ross returning from the battlefield alone and how much she must have realised she had lost for ever makes her for me one of the major characters in the books. Especially so in her few lonely appearances towards the end.

Interestingly I've always felt that WG described Cuby and her thoughts, ways and attitudes so well that I simply couldn't put the book down the first time I read it as it seemed as if it stemmed from something that might have happened to him in real life. Which then always make me think of his memoirs and the effect that the Australian lady he met briefly in Paris might have had on him....



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Date: Oct 20 7:17 PM, 2017
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Tholly Tregirls is quite an interesting minor character.  He is another who briefly has his day and then continues along in the background with occasional mentions.  I love the descriptions when he and Ross float off to France with a few others to rescue Dwight Enys.  That is a cracking story and an ingenious escape.  Without Tholly and his ability to growl and swear in French it would have been much trickier.

He is an old rascal just straining for some action, whether it's with women, free-trading or horse-dealing.  I wonder whether Ross ever got that iron hook after Tholly's death?  It would come in useful to hang something on about the farm no doubt.



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Date: Oct 20 3:22 PM, 2017
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What about the outrageously candid Margaret Cartland Vosper? I don't recall anything being mentioned about her after the Brodrugan ball. Did she continue to marry up? Maybe she worked her way up to a dissolute duke. Despite having to live in a man's world, she knew how to work around the rules and get on. 



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Date: Oct 19 9:26 AM, 2017
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Yes, Pally was definitely a man the community looked up to.  I have often wondered if Aunt Mary Rogers was his wife.  She ran the shop in Sawle you will remember and also involved herself in community affairs.  It was she who Ross talked of with Valentine in Bella Poldark, saying how gullible she was.

I don't think Demelza would have turned a hair seeing Pally dripping and naked.  She had 6 brothers to look after before her change of circumstances and nakedness in men was not that uncommon in those days.  Living in the conditions she endured at Illugan, cheek by jowl with many folk,  must have prepared her for most life events. She was far more aware of the facts of life than say, Verity, who, brought up in a far more genteel way, would not have been exposed to the randy goings on in what basically would have been slum conditions.

 

I would like to have known more of what happened to Arthur Solway and his manipulating wife.  They are minor characters who rise to the (story) top briefly, but afterwards seem to disappear into the woodwork.  Since in one of the later books, I think Bella P, Ross mentions the library, where Arthur Solway used to work, do we assume him dead or moved away to begin life elsewhere?



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Date: Oct 19 2:16 AM, 2017
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Pally Rogers was an interesting character in the early books. Although he seemed eccentric, he appeared to be a community leader and was in the mix of important events. When Ross was informed about the impending shipwrecks in Book 1, Demelza was allowed to accompany the Nampara men to view developments. They learned that Pally Rogers had made a valiant effort to rescue passengers by trying to swim out to them. As the Nampara group made their way down to the beach, Pally came out of the darkness "like a demon out of a pit...naked and dripping with his hairy body and great spade beard." (I always wondered what Demelza thought on seeing him.)

Pally was also at the pilchard catch when Ross and Demelza rowed out to watch on that beautifully described night. Then later in TFS, when Demelza took Hugh Armitage to Seal Cove, she told him that Pally sometimes rowed out and played his flute and the seals gathered round his boat.

Intriguing; in some respects Pally reminds me of the independent and respected Ben Carter.

 

 






-- Edited by Hollyhock on Thursday 19th of October 2017 02:51:52 AM

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Date: Oct 18 7:53 PM, 2017
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Throughout the twelve books there must be hundreds of characters.  We discuss the prominent ones almost endlessly.

Which of the minor people most interest you?  And why?



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