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Post Info TOPIC: Jane Austen and Winston Graham


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Date: Jul 25 2:33 PM, 2017
RE: Jane Austen and Winston Graham
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George Warleggan and Lady Susan have quite a few similarities. Although from different social classes, they are both the principal baddies in the fictional worlds they live in. They are immoral, extremely manipulative and use mental cruelty to hurt whoever displeases them.

Both are, at times, openly hostile to their children. However, I think that Morwennna would be a likely equivalent of Frederica. George does his utmost to make Morwenna unhappy and succeeds for a while, as does Lady Susan with Frederica. Both George and Lady Susan deliberately plan marriages which will cause  the utmost misery for them. George succeeds but Lady Susan doesn't. Eventually both Morwenna and Frederica achieve happiness but not before suffering considerably.

 



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Date: Jul 24 2:32 PM, 2017
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Lydia Bennet and Ruth Teague are kind of obvious. Both are what Horace Treneglos called "determined girls." Ruth is smarter -- and meaner -- of course. Lydia isn't actually mean, she's just spoiled, selfish and thoughtless. Actually, all the Teague sisters seem to be meaner than the Bennet sisters. 

I see elements of the Bingley-Darcy friendship in Francis and George's, but Darcy's efforts to keep Bingley and Jane apart were motivated by a mistaken belief that Jane's feelings for Bingley weren't sincere while Bingley's feelings for Jane were. He was trying to protect a friend. Meanwhile, George was trying to fleece a friend. 

Elizabeth could have been another Jane if her beauty weren't only skin-deep. As for my beloved Lizzie, she is post-Unwin Caroline. 

 



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Date: Jul 23 7:27 PM, 2017
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Can members think of any other similarities between JAs work and the Poldarks?

Odious Ossie Whitworth and Mr. Bennet's heir, Mr. Collins. Both were clergymen, full of themselves, and ridiculous. It's easy to imagine Mr. Collins as a closet pervert. Only the fear of Lady Catherine de Bourgh, whom he feared more than God, would have kept him in check.

Of course Hugh Armitage and George Wickham share several close characteristics. Both are charming military men who are predatory scoundrels with no moral center.

 



-- Edited by Hollyhock on Monday 24th of July 2017 03:45:39 AM

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Date: Jul 23 11:50 AM, 2017
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I noticed the Teague/Bennet coincidence too, but I see more elements of "Jane Eyre" (both Demelza and her relationship with Ross) and "Wuthering Heights" (Elizabeth seems to me to be a nicer version of Catherine Earnshaw and both Ross and George Warleggan have shades of Heathcliff and Francis initially seems much like Catherine's brother.)



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Date: Jul 23 9:36 AM, 2017
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A few days ago I was reading through some old posts.  In one of them, Jane Austen was mentioned and since this week has celebrated the bi-centenary of her death and the issue of her image on the new £10 note, it got me thinking.

The old post mentioned Mrs Teague and her five daughters, wondering if this was a nod to Jane Austen and the Bennet sisters.  I have since thought about the ball in Demelza, when Ross and Demelza have that furious exchange during a dance, admittedly in a quite different way from the Elizabeth/Darcy Netherfield ball dance, but nevertheless a similar scenario.  Could this also be an echo of Pride and Prejudice;  and did it stem from a small corner of WGs memory of JA?

We know WG was very much aware of that particular work, because Caroline mentions it in the later books, praising it as having been written by a woman.

WG says in his memoirs that before he started writing any of the Poldark books, he immersed himself in 18th/19th century literature. Inevitably, bits would have lodged themselves in his sub conscious.  

Can members think of any other similarities between JAs work and the Poldarks?



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Sunday 23rd of July 2017 12:44:46 PM

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