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Post Info TOPIC: First Impressions


Student

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Date: Jul 7 6:13 PM, 2017
RE: First Impressions
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I like the conversation when Ross is in the coach, trundling along to Truro, when Rev Dr Halse starts talking to him.  When he realises Ross is a former pupil, he remembers his insubordination and subsequent beatings.

Ross replies 'And your ankles as sore as my buttocks!'

Hmmm, each time I read this I wonder what the reference is. I've conjured up all kind of images, some less painful than others, e.g., while Halse was thrashing him, was Ross busy kicking Halse's ankles?

 



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Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

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Date: Jun 29 9:30 PM, 2017
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Below, Ross has said it was a wonderfully evocative sentence that got him hooked.

Can other members remember a particular sentence in Ross Poldark, which stands out as the means of ensnaring their imagination?

I like the conversation when Ross is in the coach, trundling along to Truro, when Rev Dr Halse starts talking to him.  When he realises Ross is a former pupil, he remembers his insubordination and subsequent beatings. 

Ross replies 'And your ankles as sore as my buttocks!'

It immediately conveys to the reader that Ross is an independent spirit, not easily broken (just as well, with all the set-backs to come) and adds a nice touch of irony along with gentle humour...

 



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Initiate

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Date: Jun 28 11:16 PM, 2017
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My Mum had got Demelza from the library - she was intrigued by the name. I'd have been about sixteen, and I'd devour a book that size in just a couple of days. I got into it very quickly, and instructed dear Mum to see if there were any more by the same author - next visit she brought home Ross. I bought the next two - sadly they disappeared long ago into the vortex of student digs. I only realised he had written more when the 70s series came on, and got the rest when the current series began. I now have them all on my Kindle, and have re-read them about half-a-dozen times. 



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Student

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Date: Jun 28 10:37 PM, 2017
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Ross- what a lovely recollection. 



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Administration

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Date: Jun 28 8:27 PM, 2017
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For me it was an unusual introduction yet very gratifying subsequent experience....

It was such a long time ago that it's hard to remember now, but I do remember seeing a copy of Warleggan in a newsagents on a station platform whilst waiting for a train. I bought it solely on impulse having no idea what it was all about, but I do remember at the end to make sure I kept the book which I've still got today yet still knowing nothing about the three earlier books at all.

It was only in about 2002 that I somehow discovered there had been three previous Poldark books, so I am always grateful that I never knew that the series had been filmed back in the 70s either.

Nonetheless I can still clearly remember the passage in RP when I was completely overwhelmed and then permanently hooked from then on by the following vivid passage painted by Winston at the end of the Prologue as Joshua finally slept....

"The stream hissed and bubbled in the darkness, and above it a long-unmended gate swung whee-tap on its hangings".

Wonderful and vivid imaginative writing because as a result I became immediately glued to the remaining ten books, reading them virtually back-to-back non-stop right up to the "The Twisted Sword" whenever I had any spare time. I read the final book Bella quite some time later but in a way I've never really felt that it quite lived up to the first eleven.

So I had the very, very lucky experience of reading pure and unadulterated Poldark by Winston Graham alone together with his wonderful imagination and marvellous writing without any outside distracting influences whatsoever....



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Date: Jun 28 5:31 PM, 2017
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As I have related before, I picked up a copy of RP at a small bookstall in an airport when my flight was delayed.  This was in the 60s and I didn't know there was another book, let alone another two after that.

I read the prologue and wanted to read on to see what Joshua's son would be like!  It is a very clever beginning because it tells the reader many things about the time, area, situation and people without them realising they are becoming drawn in.

Before I stepped onto my delayed plane the following day, I was well and truly hooked. In fact, I had read 2/3 of it!

I visited the library to see if WG had written anything else and was delighted to find there were three more books to enjoy. However, Demelza was out on loan, so I had to wait some weeks before I could borrow it.  Money wasn't plentiful then - otherwise I would have bought a copy.  Worth double the wait though...



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Undergraduate

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Date: Jun 28 12:05 PM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I would like to pose a few questions to everyone who has read the books.  biggrin

What were your first impressions when you read those first few pages of Ross Poldark? 

How long did it take you to get 'into' the book? 

How much did you have to read before you really couldn't put the book down?

What did you do when you finished the first book?

 


My first reading of Ross Poldark (the edited version) after seeing series 1 and I realised I had many questions about it. So I will give my answers as they relate to my first reading of the first edition which gave me all the answers I needed.

I was intrigued almost immediately and noticed that I enjoyed WG's writing style which drew me in. Joshua and Charles felt very real.

I got into the book within the prologue as I felt this was going to be a fascinating story.

As I had seen series 1 I was already fascinated so by the end of the prologue I could not put the book down.

When I finished the first book I opened my edited version of Demelza immediately (at that time I didn't have a first edition) and began to think about how I could find a discussion group for the Poldark books. Soon after I found the Society and the missing chapter 6 which clarified many things about Elizabeth's character that had hitherto puzzled me.



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Student

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Date: Jun 28 3:01 AM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I would like to pose a few questions to everyone who has read the books.  biggrin

What were your first impressions when you read those first few pages of Ross Poldark? 

How long did it take you to get 'into' the book? 

How much did you have to read before you really couldn't put the book down?

What did you do when you finished the first book?

 


 1. I can't remember as I was quite young (early teens) and my mum, aunt and sister were all addicts and I had been infused with the story.

2. I am pretty sure that I was hooked from the start. I tend to remember books that are slow to get into. WG's prose is my sort of thing (ie just tell the story well) whereas I have been unable to get past the first few chapters of The Book Thief because it uses what I call "fancy literary technique" which I find distracting.

3. Probably at about the Blue Dress point. By then, I just had to know...

4. "Where's the next one?"

Save



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Undergraduate

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Date: Jun 27 10:38 PM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I would like to pose a few questions to everyone who has read the books.  biggrin

What were your first impressions when you read those first few pages of Ross Poldark? 

How long did it take you to get 'into' the book? 

How much did you have to read before you really couldn't put the book down?

What did you do when you finished the first book?

 


1. I had already seen the first season of the television series so I was drawn in by the prologue, which gave me a different impression of Joshua Poldark. 

2. Immediately.

3. Not much because I had seen the series and was looking to fill in the gaps and identify the deviations.

4. Click on my Kindle edition of "Demelza."



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Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

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Date: Jun 27 8:28 PM, 2017
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I would like to pose a few questions to everyone who has read the books.  biggrin

What were your first impressions when you read those first few pages of Ross Poldark? 

How long did it take you to get 'into' the book? 

How much did you have to read before you really couldn't put the book down?

What did you do when you finished the first book?

 



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