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Post Info TOPIC: Someone buy Caroline a book on dog breeds


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Posts: 421
Date: May 24 6:17 AM, 2017
RE: Someone buy Caroline a book on dog breeds
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Fijane -- If you have never known a pug, you have missed one of life's delights. Full of good cheer and boundless energy, and never-met-a-person-it-didn't-like friendliness.

I lived next door to one, and little Frank was desperately in love with the elegant Amber, my blond shepherd mix. He was forever escaping to hang out with Amber so I got to know him very well. I called them Sonny and Cher because the differences in sizes and demeanors reminded me of the 60s singers.

If I ever get another dog, I suspect it will be a pug.



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Student

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Date: May 17 10:46 AM, 2017
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Sorry, I have no knowledge of dog breeds. I just took Caroline's word for it!



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Undergraduate

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Date: May 14 8:38 PM, 2017
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I don't know why I missed this the first time I read "Warleggan":

Asked by Lady Bodrugan what kind of dog she owns, Caroline Penvenen replies:

A pug, said Caroline. With beautiful black curly hair and a gold-brown face no bigger than the centre of this plate.'


Wrong! If Horace were a pug, his face would be black, not "gold-brown"; his coat would be short, not curly; indeed, the only thing curly on his body would be his tail. His coat could be black, but more likely, it would be fawn (which I suppose could be described as "gold-brown"). As for his face, it could be the size of the center of a plate. If you are thinking, "Breeds evolve, maybe that is what pugs looked like in the 1790s," it wasn't. The pug, one of the oldest breeds, looked pretty much the same in the 1700s as it does today, judging by the pugs that appear in portraits of their owners painted in that century. Yes, the body is sometimes leaner, the legs are a little longer, and the head is a little smaller but with a slightly less pushed-in nose, but the dogs are recognizable as pugs. You could say the pug of 18th-century portraits looks more like what modern veterinarians probably wish the pug looked today. (It would be healthier.)

OK, if Horace isn't really a pug, judging by WG's description, what is he? The reference to a curly coat rules out a Pekinese. Any guesses?

 

 



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