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Post Info TOPIC: FUTURES SERIES OF POLDARK SPOILER ALERT!!!!!!!!!


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Date: Apr 30 10:32 AM, 2017
RE: FUTURES SERIES OF POLDARK SPOILER ALERT!!!!!!!!!
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Aging Demelza?  At the end of Warleggan she was only 23!!  No age at all.  At the end of book 12 she is only 50.  Alright, that was seen to be quite an advanced age in those days, but for an active content woman, who was healthy and scorned the damaging cosmetics of the day, she had every reason to look attractive and youthful still.  No-one ever mistook her for very young in the later books, but I think women often become more beautiful as they grow comfortably into older age.



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Date: Apr 29 4:34 AM, 2017
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I agree that they should make Demelza look her age to fit the story. Makeup people can do wonders aging people. Probably better at that than trying to make an actor look younger. Here is a photo of me made to look like a Wizard by the Lyric Opera Chicago makeup artist. 



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Date: Apr 28 10:20 PM, 2017
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But that then begs the question, how do you bring D more into the story? Surely she won't travel to France to rescue Dwight. Maybe she might be more involved in Caroline's scheming with the French emigres. Given past form, I wouldn't be surprised if they sent her over to Trenwith frequently to confront Elizabeth, but that would be awful.

 

 

Why can't they just follow the damn story?  That is why I am watching the series in the first place.  I don't watch merely for Demelza.  Are Debbie Horsfield and the BBC trying to rewrite the story for those viewers who are Demelza fans?  is that it?



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Date: Feb 7 11:52 AM, 2017
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Dave wrote:

There have been some complaints about W.G. portrayal of Demelza as older women, a woman in her 30 and 40's. Their complaint is that he is stuck with Demelza as a very young 20 something gal. They wonder how older women can still be attractive to men. Well, I remember  W.G.'s Demelza as not being portrayed as beautiful women but an attractive one made so by her lively manner, her eyes ( I am myself am an eye man, my wife has beautiful blue-green eyes), her smile and her wit that was very ably articulated by her tongue. Those qualities are timeless in women.

I would like to hear from you gals as to how older women should be portrayed by a writer. 



-- Edited by Dave on Saturday 4th of February 2017 04:12:01 PM


Julia Roberts doesn't seem to have too much trouble still being considered attractive. I mention her because the descriptions of Demelza in "Ross Poldark" -- including the untamed dark hair -- are reminiscent of Julia Roberts in "Mystic Pizza," one of her earliest performances. (If you haven't seen it, check this out: https://www.moviefone.com/2013/10/21/mystic-pizza-cast-where-are-they-now/?a_dgi=aolshare_email)

 

 

 



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Date: Feb 4 4:10 PM, 2017
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There have been some complaints about W.G. portrayal of Demelza as older women, a woman in her 30 and 40's. Their complaint is that he is stuck with Demelza as a very young 20 something gal. They wonder how older women can still be attractive to men. Well, I remember  W.G.'s Demelza as not being portrayed as beautiful women but an attractive one made so by her lively manner, her eyes ( I am myself am an eye man, my wife has beautiful blue-green eyes), her smile and her wit that was very ably articulated by her tongue. Those qualities are timeless in women.

I would like to hear from you gals as to how older women should be portrayed by a writer. 



-- Edited by Dave on Saturday 4th of February 2017 04:12:01 PM

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Date: Feb 4 1:41 PM, 2017
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Fijane wrote:

I know that this thread has been a little dormant, but I wanted to come back to it in light of the comment I made earlier starting "Since when did Demelza step back.."

In re-reading The Black Moon and The Fours Swans, I now need to make a little apology to the producers because I can now see where they have got that impression. Especially in TBM, Demelza does move to the background a bit. Most of the Ross-and-Demelza parts of the storyline involve Ross being away from home, and then there is a scene when he returns home and all is discussed with D. It is true that she doesn't really go anywhere in this book.

It never mattered before (if I even noticed it) but after the producers comments about D in the next series, I could see how someone not familiar with the whole series might see it.

But that then begs the question, how do you bring D more into the story? Surely she won't travel to France to rescue Dwight. Maybe she might be more involved in Caroline's scheming with the French emigres. Given past form, I wouldn't be surprised if they sent her over to Trenwith frequently to confront Elizabeth, but that would be awful.

How do you think D should be given more airtime in the early part of the next series?

 


 I would like to hear something of what is going on with Demelza while Ross is away - how she is feeling. So I would like her to spend time with Caroline talking about this.



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Date: Feb 4 1:46 AM, 2017
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I know that this thread has been a little dormant, but I wanted to come back to it in light of the comment I made earlier starting "Since when did Demelza step back.."

In re-reading The Black Moon and The Fours Swans, I now need to make a little apology to the producers because I can now see where they have got that impression. Especially in TBM, Demelza does move to the background a bit. Most of the Ross-and-Demelza parts of the storyline involve Ross being away from home, and then there is a scene when he returns home and all is discussed with D. It is true that she doesn't really go anywhere in this book.

It never mattered before (if I even noticed it) but after the producers comments about D in the next series, I could see how someone not familiar with the whole series might see it.

But that then begs the question, how do you bring D more into the story? Surely she won't travel to France to rescue Dwight. Maybe she might be more involved in Caroline's scheming with the French emigres. Given past form, I wouldn't be surprised if they sent her over to Trenwith frequently to confront Elizabeth, but that would be awful.

How do you think D should be given more airtime in the early part of the next series?

 



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Date: Dec 1 4:33 PM, 2016
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JanetMaison wrote:


DH completely changed the characters of Demelza and Ross.  Like all good literature, the book provides a road map for living: how does a couple survive a betrayal and heal. The TV series is a road map for how not to heal: tell her to get over it and denigrate your partner. Unlike the books, the TV series requires no deep thought or reflection. Perhaps DH thinks modern audiences need to be spoon-fed in little bits so they can digest it.  I find it painful to watch. Hate it. 


 Janet - I agree with you. It is so different in the books and Ross and Demelza are more believable as characters in the books. I think Debbie H has overplayed the extent to which Ross and Demelza have changed after Julia's death. In the books it is clear this has affected them but not in such an extreme way. In the production Ross and Demelza are not just taken to the edge of the cliff, they are thrown over it and end up in a state from which realistically they cannot repair their marriage. Watching this drama that strays so far from the stores and the characters eaves me, to some extent, confused about what is in the books and what isn't. Whether I shall watch series 3 or not I cannot say. I suspect curiosity will tempt me back, sadly.

Stella



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This seems to suggest that already the BBC is planning to carry on and cover all the books but there seems to me a slight hint that Aidan Turner may not play Ross throughout. Also there is an intention to move further from the books to keep Demelza as the main character or joint main character with Ross. I am not sure I like the sound of this at all. What do others think?

Stella

My first post.

There is a Masterpiece video titled What to Expect in Season 3 (Poldark).  The video is on you tube.  The whole video was really odd to me.  It begins with Aidan Turner saying something to the effect that, his brain was not yet in Season 3, and that he simply wears the period clothes and says the words.  He was laughing while talking.  Then Eleanor Tomlinson demurely refers to the obstacle in the middle of a marriage.  There are some scenes from Season 2.  Then, back to Aidan Turner, and he talks about not wanting to say anything when he did not know what Debbie has kept in from the books!  He added that Debbie would call him and that he would get in trouble for misspeaking.  It ends with scenes from Season 2.  There was not a whole lot about Season 3 in the video. 

The reporters have written about Aidan Turner playing James Bond or not thinking he can pull off an older Ross.  The thought ran through my head that Aidan Turner may be questioning the writing too.  But, do not think that he would ever say anything.

  



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SusanneMcCarthy wrote:

I agree. They really over-cooked it in Episode 10, and detracted a great deal from Demelza's charm - "witty without malice" as one character described her. 


DH completely changed the characters of Demelza and Ross.  Like all good literature, the book provides a road map for living: how does a couple survive a betrayal and heal. The TV series is a road map for how not to heal: tell her to get over it and denigrate your partner. Unlike the books, the TV series requires no deep thought or reflection. Perhaps DH thinks modern audiences need to be spoon-fed in little bits so they can digest it.  I find it painful to watch. Hate it. 



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Date: Nov 28 10:04 PM, 2016
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I agree. They really over-cooked it in Episode 10, and detracted a great deal from Demelza's charm - "witty without malice" as one character described her. 



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Fijane wrote:

Since when did Demelza "step back" from the story? And since when did she have "lots of children" with the implication that they chained her to the kitchen? Has this woman ever read the books?

Demelza has one more child through the next three books, making a total of two living children featuring at this point. As she and Ross become more prosperous, R insists on getting her more help around the house, they both start appearing more in higher society. She begins to mix in more highly born circles, earning the favour of many great men.

Debbie Horsfield and the producers need to take a good look at themselves.



-- Edited by Fijane on Monday 7th of November 2016 09:55:39 PM


I agree 100%.  I think it is all geared toward modern audiences with limited attention spans.



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Date: Nov 7 9:54 PM, 2016
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Since when did Demelza "step back" from the story? And since when did she have "lots of children" with the implication that they chained her to the kitchen? Has this woman ever read the books?

Demelza has one more child through the next three books, making a total of two living children featuring at this point. As she and Ross become more prosperous, R insists on getting her more help around the house, they both start appearing more in higher society. She begins to mix in more highly born circles, earning the favour of many great men.

Debbie Horsfield and the producers need to take a good look at themselves.



-- Edited by Fijane on Monday 7th of November 2016 09:55:39 PM

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Date: Nov 7 7:22 AM, 2016
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This would explain all the changes from the books to the TV.  They want to make Demelza more feisty to appeal to modern audiences.  And making her a feisty feminist apparently means showing her as an aggressive, belittling harpy.

 

 

 

I got that feeling from the last few episodes.  If that is Debbie Horsfield's idea of being a "feisty feminist", she can keep it.



 

If the next books they are adapting are "Black Moon" and "The Four Swans", they don't have to worry about Demelza being shoved to the background.  How stupid.



-- Edited by LJones41 on Monday 7th of November 2016 07:25:35 AM

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I don't like the sound of this at all!

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Date: Nov 6 5:24 PM, 2016
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This would explain all the changes from the books to the TV.  They want to make Demelza more feisty to appeal to modern audiences.  And making her a feisty feminist apparently means showing her as an aggressive, belittling harpy.



-- Edited by JanetMaison on Sunday 6th of November 2016 07:47:14 PM

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/11/05/feisty-demelza-is-too-popular-to-just-bake-pies-says-poldark-pro/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

The following article from yesterday's telegraph appears to show what will happen in future series.

"Feisty Demelza is too popular to just bake pies says Poldark producer, as BBC drama moves character away from plot of original novels

5 NOVEMBER 2016 10:00PM

In the Winston Graham books, Demelza is just about due to take a backseat from the main plot of Poldark to have some more children and concentrate on her baking.

But producers of the BBC adaptation have vowed to keep her as the centre of attention in the next series of the hit period drama, after finding her feisty character connected best with modern viewers.

Demelza, played by Eleanor Tomlinson, has won viewers' hearts with her forthright on-screen feminism, putting her cheating husband Ross firmly in his place.

The final episode of the series, broadcast on Sunday, will see the feuding married couple decide whether to stay together amid the aftermath of his one-night affair with old flame Elizabeth.

 

Filming for the third series of Poldark is already underway, due to be completed in the spring and aired in autumn next year. The next instalment will move to books five and six of the Graham series, introducing new characters in the shape of Demelza's brothers and putting the villainous George Warleggan centre stage again.

But while Demelza took something of a step back from the main plot of the novels, programme-makers have decided she will remain the star of the show after identifying her as the character most modern female viewers could identify with.  

Karen Thrussell, producer of the show, said: "She's actually a very modern character. 

"We have a book written by a man in the 1940s, about people in the 18th century, and now we're looking at it through our eyes.

 

"I think that the spirit of Demelza we start off with is feisty: she says what she thinks, her opinions aren't what society thinks they should be but her own, which I think is a very modern concept.

"I think what happens in the books, as you go on, is that because they move on to other characters, Demelza takes a backstep.

"She goes on to have lots of children and women of that class didn't go out to work at that time, so she's there baking pies.

"But that's not the modern woman we come to expect from our Demelza, that we fell in love with right from series one and book one.

"So what Debbie [Horsfield, the writer] has tried to do is keep the spirit of Demelza that was there in the first book and carry on with it." 

She added the decision had been taken partly because of the "absolutely phenomenal" Tomlinson, who made it possible to carry so many emotional scenes into future series.

Aidan Turner's rise to fame in 60 secondsPlay!00:50

The next series will see one line, where Demelza defers to Ross when making a decision, changed to show her husband ask her opinion as "equal partners". 

"Ross is always very central to the books, so it's a matter of making sure Demelza is still central too," she said.

The cast have already signed up to five series of the show,  with the BBC planning to continue broadcasting well into Graham's dozen novels.

The final episode of series two will see a happy ending for one couple and an explosive twist for another.

This series has seen Poldark go head to head with ITV's Victoria, made by the same production company and fighting for a similar period drama-loving audience.

 

Initial figures showed Victoria pipping its BBC rival in the ratings, but Thrussell said Poldark has now been shown to have won the 9pm Sunday slot. 

"It's still the BBC's biggest drama," she said.

"I think last year in the run-up to the elections, everybody was talking about Poldark. They were looking for a leader almost and Ross Poldark seemed like a good candidate.

"Then I think, weirdly, going head-to-head with Victoria, which is a great show and is very nationalistic about the monarchy and the Empire...I think post Brexit people were feeling quite gung-ho about that sort of thing."

When asked about the reaction when programme-makers learned the shows were going up against one another, she admitted: "I think everyone went noooo at first. It was like, 'please don't do that'. But there isn't much we can do about that.

"Poldark was the biggest hit of last year and ITV wanted to put their best up against it. It was a good gamble on their part."

 

The final episode of this season's Poldark will be broadcast on BBC One on Sunday evening.

This seems to suggest that already the BBC is planning to carry on and cover all the books but there seems to me a slight hint that Aidan Turner may not play Ross throughout. Also there is an intention to move further from the books to keep Demelza as the main character or joint main character with Ross. I am not sure I like the sound of this at all. What do others think?

Stella

 

 



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