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Post Info TOPIC: Series 2 Episode 6


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Date: Oct 31 11:30 PM, 2016
RE: Series 2 Episode 6
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Thanks so much, it makes more sense now. When you come to think of it, nearly everyone in the series has the wrong colour hair.



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Date: Oct 31 8:34 AM, 2016
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Fijane wrote:
Dark Mare wrote:

Tomlinson's own hair color is blond so they made Demelza a redhead. (I got all this from the documentary made about Season 2.)


†Dark Mare, did they say in the documentary why they couldn't have just dyed Elinor's hair dark brown? There was no reason to make it red, unless they were stuck with the Angharad Rees image in their heads.


Actually, the red hair was Tomlinson's idea. She thought Demelza's temperament fit better as a redhead so when she did her Demelza audition (she already had locked up the part of Elizabeth but asked to read for Demelza), she showed up as a redhead.

I suspect she wasn't opposed to being a very dark brunette (although her skin tone is all wrong), but she probably didn't want to have to spend several years wearing dark-brown contact lenses. †WG repeatedly wrote that in candlelight Demelza sometimes has a drugged look because her eye color is such a dark brown that it looks like she has no irises, just enormous pupils. (In my edition of "Ross Poldark," he confused irises and pupils and used iris when he meant pupil or pupil when he meant iris, I forget which.) Then again, Aidan Turner has dark brown eyes instead of the book's blue eyes so maybe Demelza had to have blue eyes for the genetics to work for the Poldark children.†



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Date: Oct 31 5:09 AM, 2016
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Dark Mare wrote:

Tomlinson's own hair color is blond so they made Demelza a redhead. (I got all this from the documentary made about Season 2.)


†Dark Mare, did they say in the documentary why they couldn't have just dyed Elinor's hair dark brown? There was no reason to make it red, unless they were stuck with the Angharad Rees image in their heads.



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Date: Oct 31 5:06 AM, 2016
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Apart from the stocking scene, which I enjoyed, this was definitely a weaker episode. Putting Ross and Demelza at loggerheads all the way through was really irritating. Maybe they were trying to give the stocking scene more impact, but it was so out of character for both of them, but especially Demelza. In the books, her fears about R and their financial situation were evident by her thoughts, so I know they needed them to be verbalised in the series, but they have gone overboard and made her sound shrewish and pessimistic. Where is the wonderful optimistic Demelza we know?

I'm now used to too much Elizabeth and George, but this episode takes the cake. E telling Geoffrey Charles that she musn't get wrinkles - what is that? Totally pointless scene. I really just want Elizabeth to go away now, a long way away. Loving Aunt Agatha though. I realise that they have changed her a bit - she is more wily, and less elderly, but we are starting to see what a thorn in George's side she will become.

On the other hand, Dwight and Caroline are still perfect, to me. I'm loving Gabriella Wilde, and Luke Norris is fantastic. Having never heard of either of them before, they will now never be able to do anything else - they will always be Dwight and Caroline.

Why are we seeing so little of Jeremy? Julia was in nearly all the scenes, as a baby. Demelza was carrying her, feeding her, she was playing on the floor. Jeremy is suddenly older (we missed his whole babyhood) and obviously entertains himself all day. Surely when Verity was visiting he would have been in the room with them? We saw close ups of Julia's face and expressions, but Jeremy is a faceless, dark-haired (when he should be blonde) body in the background. Not good enough.



-- Edited by Fijane on Monday 31st of October 2016 05:07:38 AM

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Date: Oct 17 2:35 PM, 2016
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LJones41 wrote:
†I guess in the case of "Poldark", this all began when Angharad Rees, who was a redhead, was cast as the dark-haired Demelza back in 1975.



-- Edited by LJones41 on Saturday 15th of October 2016 07:44:06 PM


Actually, it happened because they originally wanted Eleanor Tomlinson to be Elizabeth, but she had her heart set on playing Demelza. They agreed to let her come back to read for Demelza the next day. She showed up dressed in her brother's clothes and wowed them with her †Demelza.

Tomlinson's own hair color is blond so they made Demelza a redhead. (I got all this from the documentary made about Season 2.)



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Date: Oct 16 5:36 AM, 2016
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LJones41 wrote:

My problem with Gabriella Wilde is she looks too much like what I imagined Elizabeth looked like from the books' descriptions -- minus that fragility that hinted of anexoria, of course (I remember thinking of the "social x-rays" in "Bonfires of the Vanities" when I first read about Elizabeth.). In its place is an appealing vitality.

Anorexia? †Elizabeth? †For a woman who is supposed to be "fragile looking", she always seemed to be rather healthy. †And I'm not talking about Heida Reed's version of the character.

It's interesting. †All three women do not match their descriptions in the novel. †Which doesn't really bother me, because I have encountered this phenomenon before with the two leads in John Jakes' "North and South" trilogy and its television adaptations. †I guess in the case of "Poldark", this all began when Angharad Rees, who was a redhead, was cast as the dark-haired Demelza back in 1975.



-- Edited by LJones41 on Saturday 15th of October 2016 07:44:06 PM


†I think from the first time I heard the word "ethereal" applied to a person, I saw Elizabeth. She was rarely ill, but always gave the impression of being transparent and floaty.



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Date: Oct 15 7:41 PM, 2016
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My problem with Gabriella Wilde is she looks too much like what I imagined Elizabeth looked like from the books' descriptions -- minus that fragility that hinted of anexoria, of course (I remember thinking of the "social x-rays" in "Bonfires of the Vanities" when I first read about Elizabeth.). In its place is an appealing vitality.

Anorexia? †Elizabeth? †For a woman who is supposed to be "fragile looking", she always seemed to be rather healthy. †And I'm not talking about Heida Reed's version of the character.

It's interesting. †All three women do not match their descriptions in the novel. †Which doesn't really bother me, because I have encountered this phenomenon before with the two leads in John Jakes' "North and South" trilogy and its television adaptations. †I guess in the case of "Poldark", this all began when Angharad Rees, who was a redhead, was cast as the dark-haired Demelza back in 1975.



-- Edited by LJones41 on Saturday 15th of October 2016 07:44:06 PM

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Date: Oct 15 7:08 PM, 2016
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The three leading ladies have ended up with each other's hair!



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Date: Oct 15 3:13 PM, 2016
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†Gabriella Wilde does look like the description of book Elizabeth to me as well and maybe the reason she doesn't look fragile is because she was pregnant throughout the shooting of season two. †I have been quite enjoying her portrayal of Caroline so far, I have not found her acting to be woody or bad. The scene where she asks Dwight who he is and tells him that while he was learning to be a doctor she was learning to be a heiress, was very well done and there was a vulnerability to her performance, that I found very charming.†

It must be hard to step into a role that was so iconically played by another actress, that for some you would never be able to live up to that performance. I am sure that Eleanor Tomlinson, was put in the same position in season one, although †I haven't heard any complaints about her version of Demelza lately.



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Date: Oct 14 8:34 AM, 2016
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My problem with Gabriella Wilde is she looks too much like what I imagined Elizabeth looked like from the books' descriptions -- minus that fragility that hinted of anexoria, of course (I remember thinking of the "social x-rays" in "Bonfires of the Vanities" when I first read about Elizabeth.). In its place is an appealing vitality.†

And shouldn't Caroline be self-assured in the early scenes? She is a parrot speaking the unfiltered opinions of her elderly bachelor uncles as if they are her own. If Uncle Ray says the poor are unhealthy because they spend too much money on gin, it must be true. Is it possible the problem isn't miscasting in the role of Caroline as much as in the role of Unwin? The two are together in so many of the early scenes, and he is being played as such a callow buffoon. (It was almost an insult to Demelza to have that nitwit call her "a dangerous woman." He's probably still afraid of his governess. In the books Unwin is a worldly man in his, what, later thirties or even early forties? If a sophisticated man like that calls you a dangerous woman, that's reason to walk a little taller.)

I think Debbie Horsfield did make a mistake by adding that scene in which Caroline encounters Dwight on the street and tells him she has a sore throat. I know the meeting was supposed to get across the idea that these two people are very attracted to each other but keep saying exactly the wrong things whenever they meet, but it's too much. Dwight would have behaved differently in the fish-bone scene if he knew she had had a sore throat a few days earlier and he had done nothing to help her. He could have spared her considerable discomfort if he had steered her to Dr. Choake right away so Choake could see the fish bone and remove it before the abscess that later concealed it had formed. At the very least he would have apologized for showing no interest in her complaint of a sore throat when they last met. Yes, she was Choake's patient so he couldn't treat her, but he might have been able to steer Choake to the problem if he had asked her a few questions, such as "When did your throat start to hurt?" and "Have you eaten any fish lately?"†



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Date: Oct 13 3:30 PM, 2016
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

I†reserve judgment†about Caroline.† I do feel she should be more imperious and brittle.† She appears far too self assured for my liking - which is in part how she comes over in the books, but she is also vulnerable and in private, quite unsure about life.† It is a difficult part to play, but having seen a small bit of 1970s Caroline on Youtube, she is more like I imagine her.


†I have heard negative reviews of Gabriella Wilde's acting ability and am beginning to believe them. It is important to have somebody really good in this role. Judy Geeson was, I think, a much better Caroline. Time will tell as she has an increasing role in series 3.†

Stella



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Date: Oct 13 1:06 PM, 2016
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I'm now glad Prudie was kept around for Episode 6 so she could give Demelza that pep talk. (Jane Gimlett hadn't known Grace Poldark so she couldn't have told Demelza that not only would Ross' mother have considered her the right match for her son but also that she would have thought Demelza wasn't being difficult, Ross was.) Demelza needed to hear that from someone who had known Ross forever and knew all the things she was doing secretly to prop up the household so he wouldn't feel he was failing as a provider. It was a lucky accident that Ross happened upon Prudie when the secret cache was open so she could tell him what had been going on. Ross needed to know just how good to him Demelza really is, how little she asks in return and how even that seems to be too much for him to manage. He talked to Harris Pascoe about Demelza having survival skills because she was a miner's daughter and Elizabeth needing to be taken care of because she was a gentlewoman before he ever knew how those survival skills were taking care of him.

I think having Ross and Demelza pay off the promissory note in person instead of having Harris Pascoe do it was a very nice touch. Yes, Jeremy missed out on getting his new cap and mittens, but the stocking scene was so special.†



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Date: Oct 13 10:36 AM, 2016
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I†don't understand†why Demelza rode into Truro with Ross to see Harris Pascoe.† For a start, they only had one horse at that time, but that has been forgotten.† The episode of Harris imparting the good news to Ross as written by WG is so lovely.† He cannot believe his good fortune and to celebrate he buys small gifts for all the household.†Meanwhile Demelza is worrying that something else has gone wrong. †Then on his return to Nampara, the touching scene when he puts the garters on Demelza is a very special moment.

I suppose this is the problem with adaptations; we all build pictures in our minds about the tender scenes and when transferred to the screen they are not as we imagine them.† Perhaps the answer is just to watch the series as something apart from WG and all we know in the books.† Very hard to achieve.

I†reserve judgment†about Caroline.† I do feel she should be more imperious and brittle.† She appears far too self assured for my liking - which is in part how she comes over in the books, but she is also vulnerable and in private, quite unsure about life.† It is a difficult part to play, but having seen a small bit of 1970s Caroline on Youtube, she is more like I imagine her.



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Date: Oct 13 5:25 AM, 2016
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On a whole, I think the problem is that by trying to make Elizabeth a warmer, more fleshed out character, has had a ripple effect on the telling of this story and quite frankly is making Ross come across as an unfeeling jerk.

After reading "Warleggan", I thought Ross was an unfeeling jerk anyway. †I also thought that Robin Ellis' Ross Poldark was an unfeeling jerk in Episode 6 of the 1975 series, when he fired Prudie for Jud's screwup.



-- Edited by LJones41 on Thursday 13th of October 2016 05:25:53 AM

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Date: Oct 11 9:17 PM, 2016
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MrsMartin wrote:
Stella Poldark wrote:
The stocking scene left a lot to be desired when in the book Ross comes home with gifts for everyone and there is a lovely conversation between him and Demelza culminating in Ross putting on the garters. This was too rushed. In fact so much is too rushed. There is a feeling that much of the weaknesses in series 2 could be the fault of the directors. apparently there are three. It feels like many parts of the scripts have been cut.

I agree there is too much George. Overall, I am not enjoying this series as much as the first one. Perhaps one reason is that now I have now read the books 3 or 4 times so I know how the story should be but I don't think that is the only reason. I sometimes watch and enjoy series one so it cannot be this aspect entirely.

Stella


Stella,

I have to agree with you about the stocking scene and this adaptation. I too am enjoying it less and for the same reason. There are several scenes between Ross and Demelza, that have either been glossed over, not given the same emphasis or that are just missing. In series one there were several scenes, the Pilchard, then when they are back in their room after the Christmas party at Trenwith, Demelza's labour and the one after the ball, all show Ross' care and consideration for Demelza. This series there was, Ross saying that he didn't want anymore children, when Demelza tells Ross she in pregnant, the toast from Francis and when Ross and Demelza, are getting dressed for Caroline's engagement party, all very important to the story. I certainly think that they could have done without George's boxing lessons and propositioning Elizabeth. On a whole, I think the problem is that by trying to make Elizabeth a warmer, more fleshed out character, has had a ripple effect on the telling of this story and quite frankly is making Ross come across as an unfeeling jerk.


†I actually liked the stocking scene, but I would have to agree with you about everything else. The directors are all over the place and there is way too much George.



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Date: Oct 11 3:08 PM, 2016
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Stella Poldark wrote:
The stocking scene left a lot to be desired when in the book Ross comes home with gifts for everyone and there is a lovely conversation between him and Demelza culminating in Ross putting on the garters. This was too rushed. In fact so much is too rushed. There is a feeling that much of the weaknesses in series 2 could be the fault of the directors. apparently there are three. It feels like many parts of the scripts have been cut.

I agree there is too much George. Overall, I am not enjoying this series as much as the first one. Perhaps one reason is that now I have now read the books 3 or 4 times so I know how the story should be but I don't think that is the only reason. I sometimes watch and enjoy series one so it cannot be this aspect entirely.

Stella


†Stella,

I have to agree with you about the stocking scene and this adaptation. I too am enjoying it less and for the same reason. There are several scenes between Ross and Demelza, that have either been glossed over, not given the same emphasis or that are just missing. In series one there were several scenes, †the Pilchard, then when they are back in their room after the Christmas party at Trenwith, Demelza's labour and the one after the ball, all show Ross' care and consideration for Demelza. This series there was, Ross saying that he didn't want anymore children, when Demelza tells Ross she in pregnant, the toast from Francis and when Ross and Demelza, are getting dressed for Caroline's engagement party, all very important to the story. I certainly think that they could have done without George's boxing lessons and propositioning Elizabeth. On a whole, I think the problem is that by trying to make Elizabeth a warmer, more fleshed out character, has had a ripple effect on the telling of this story and quite frankly is making Ross come across as an unfeeling jerk.†



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Date: Oct 11 1:23 PM, 2016
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

More than half way through now.† So far, I think there has been too much George, in both series actually.† He really doesn't feature so much in the books.

I'm sure we'll see quite a bit more of him though.

I can see why episode 6 ended with the 'stocking' scene, but it made no sense to me whatsoever that Ross sold the rest of his Wheal Leisure shares before Caroline generously paid off his debts.† With £600, why on earth wouldn't he want to use it to reduce his own owings?† The change in order of events just made him†appear more†reckless than ever. The other thing I wonder about is the lack of Elizabeth's father and George's parents.† Uncle Cary is only to be found skulking in the bank in the books.† It must be the budget which has done for them, but it does distort things somewhat.

Your thoughts, please. . .


†The lack of George's parents was determined in series 1 at Elizabeth's wedding reception. George and Ross had a brief conversation during which George said "we have something in common" and then something to the effect that they had both lost their fathers.†

The stocking scene left a lot to be desired when in the book Ross comes home with gifts for everyone and there is a lovely conversation between him and Demelza culminating in Ross putting on the garters. This was too rushed. In fact so much is too rushed. There is a feeling that much of the weaknesses in series 2 could be the fault of the directors. apparently there are three. It feels like many parts of the scripts have been cut.†

I agree there is too much George. Overall, I am not enjoying this series as much as the first one. Perhaps one reason is that now I have now read the books 3 or 4 times so I know how the story should be but I don't think that is the only reason. I sometimes watch and enjoy series one so it cannot be this aspect entirely.

Stella



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Date: Oct 10 10:03 PM, 2016
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More than half way through now.  So far, I think there has been too much George, in both series actually.  He really doesn't feature so much in the books.

I'm sure we'll see quite a bit more of him though.

 

I can see why episode 6 ended with the 'stocking' scene, but it made no sense to me whatsoever that Ross sold the rest of his Wheal Leisure shares before Caroline generously paid off his debts.  With £600, why on earth wouldn't he want to use it to reduce his own owings?  The change in order of events just made him appear more reckless than ever. The other thing I wonder about is the lack of Elizabeth's father and George's parents.  Uncle Cary is only to be found skulking in the bank in the books.  It must be the budget which has done for them, but it does distort things somewhat.

Your thoughts, please. . .



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