Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Series 2 Episode 2


Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 8
Date: Oct 8 9:05 PM, 2016
RE: Series 2 Episode 2
Permalink  
 


I just watched Episode 2 from Series 2 and I am sorely disappointed.† Jud's funeral was my second favorite part from all the Poldark novels.† The new series gave it a flat, humorless treatment.† There was nothing funny or enjoyable about it.† I do not blame the actors, the writer has no clue to Jud's personality and predicaments and no idea of how to script this.† The old series from 1975 did a credible job of recreating the funeral.



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 339
Date: Oct 6 9:06 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Of course you are right. I had completely forgotten about the £900 pounds Ross owed Pascoe's Bank, which he was going to use the sale of his stake in Wheal Leisure to pay off. Until, that is, he found out the interested buyer was George Warleggan's Mr. Coke. I don't know where I got the idea Ross helped Tonkin and Johnson as well as Blewett with the £1,000, but that was the idea I had. Thank you for setting me straight.†



__________________


Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Online
Posts: 671
Date: Oct 5 9:32 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Yes, Blewett started a shipyard, which, when he was up and running, enabled him to repay Ross some of the loan.  It was this money Ross ploughed into Wheal Grace and not long after struck the tin lode.  So in a sense, Ross saved Blewett and in turn he saved Ross from ruin.

The confusion about how many loans he had may come in way the story progressed.  Ross thought the £1000 was a second mortgage, and hoped only interest would be payable for a couple of years.  That was so for year 1, the time when R&D sold items to find the cash, but Mr Pearce passed the Promissory note on to Cary Warleggan during the second year.  Of course, they wanted it to ruin Ross but hadn't reckoned on his anonymous donor!

Meanwhile, Ross had sold half his shares in Leisure to plunge into Grace.



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 339
Date: Oct 4 11:31 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

I could have sworn there were two, but I haven't time to refresh my memory on this now. Is Blewitt the guy with the shipyard?



__________________


Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Online
Posts: 671
Date: Oct 4 7:28 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Dark Mare,

I think the†£1000 loan†Ross had at 40% was as a result of him refusing to sell his shares to Mr Coke (George's nominee).† He needed the money to write off his debts after the Copper company collapsed.† When he found there was a small surplus, that's when he decided to loan it to Blewett who was in danger of going to prison as a result of his Carnmore debts. His wasn't so quixotic as to borrow £1000†just to give to friends.

As you say, though, it was Demelza's suggestion to sell their belongings but at that time†she was feeling that Ross was more interested in Elizabeth than in her.† When she discovered he was actually†distressed at his financial state, she became her usual practical self and felt ashamed that she had misread him.



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 339
Date: Oct 4 6:49 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Did it strike anyone else as unfair to Demelza that the writers let Ross be the one who decided to sell their jewelry, furniture and livestock to raise the money needed to pay the interest on the promissory note? That scene in the book was so touching. Demelza offered her only piece of good jewelry, the brooch with the ruby in it, as well as her ball gown and her horse as the first items to sell. (When Ross refused to let her sell the ball gown, she grumbled about it feeding the moths instead.) She next went through the house pointing out all the furniture and furnishings she and Verity had picked out, and then they went out to the barn and looked for livestock to sell. It pained Ross, who thought about how much the animals were worth, but not Demelza. She had found a way to help.†

That £1,000 loan always bothered me because Ross took it out to lend money to the Carnmore investors who were facing bankruptcy and failed to tell Demelza about it or its scandalously high interest rate for months. I couldn't figure out why he didn't tell her until it suddenly dawned on me that he didn't want her to feel guilty. Francis' vindictive reaction to her efforts to engineer Verity's elopement -- leaking the investors' names to George -- caused the investors' financial troubles so Ross felt obligated to do what he could to make them whole. (The funny thing is, if he had gone to see Captain Blamey when Demelza first asked him to [Christmas night at Trenwith], and things had proceeded at the same pace, the Carnmore Copper Co. would not have even existed yet so maybe he felt the guilt was really his. And he would be right.)

Actually, he really bore the responsibility either way when you think about it. When he wanted to invite Verity to stay months earlier, he emphasized Verity's ill health and need for a change. Demelza balked until he told her Verity was nursing a broken heart and she had been there for him when he was in the same position. He then said Verity needed Demelza to get her interested in life again. †Demelza then agreed to welcome Verity. After an initial rough patch, Demelza embraced Verity and was determined to fix her life. Ross had an obligation to Verity, and he delegated responsibility for his obligation to Demelza. Anything she did after that was his responsibility because he had involved Demelza. That's how I see it anyway.



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 227
Date: Oct 4 11:22 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Fijane wrote:

Yes, Dark Mare, I had the same impression as you, that Lister was quite aware who she was and her relationship to Ross, but he would not let it make any difference while the trial was happening. The reference to the "deserving wife" was a clear hint that he knew.

Reflecting on the episode another 24 hours, I've realised that the reason that changing the scene between Lister and Demelza annoyed me most is because it portrays D in a completely opposite light. In the book, what she does proves her skill and intelligence with people. She doesn't blunder in, pleading for mercy, but reads Lister well and uses her charm to achieve her aim. George's interference makes her look like a bumbler who has failed. I feel like the writer took some of Demelza's beauty away from her.


†Fijane, I feel exactly the same and you have expressed it so well. There is no reason I can think of to make such a change and I am dreading what is to come. It is too late for this series to redeem itself I fear.



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 151
Date: Oct 4 5:54 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Yes, Dark Mare, I had the same impression as you, that Lister was quite aware who she was and her relationship to Ross, but he would not let it make any difference while the trial was happening. The reference to the "deserving wife" was a clear hint that he knew.

Reflecting on the episode another 24 hours, I've realised that the reason that changing the scene between Lister and Demelza annoyed me most is because it portrays D in a completely opposite light. In the book, what she does proves her skill and intelligence with people. She doesn't blunder in, pleading for mercy, but reads Lister well and uses her charm to achieve her aim. George's interference makes her look like a bumbler who has failed. I feel like the writer took some of Demelza's beauty away from her.



__________________


Undergraduate

Status: Offline
Posts: 339
Date: Oct 3 1:20 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Fijane wrote:

... But the biggest gripe I have, is Demelza's meeting with Judge Lister. In the book, I love the way she manages to build a rapport with him over church music and other cultural things, with barely the merest hint of discussing how trials are judged. She leaves the assembly with the Judge having no idea that she is related to the man on his court list. He realises it during the trial, but being the extremely righteous man he is, she believes it has made no difference. Bringing George into it (who I believe was not even at that gathering) ruined the whole feel of the incident.

... Finally, DH totally neglects to allow Judge Lister to have the final say. It was so unresolved to just let them all walk out of the courthouse, without him giving his judgement, especially where he shows that he would not have let him off lightly and that Ross should be very careful not to come before the law again (which speaks to the decision to be involved in smuggling).


†Fijane, I completely agree. I've always thought Judge Lister's lecture to Ross at the end of the trial was meant as a favor to Demelza and his way of telling her so was his reference to her as Ross' "deserving wife."

I think it is funny that for months afterwards, Ross kept asking her what she did in Bodmin, and she always changed the subject. I guess it is rather difficult to explain to the person you were trying to help that you put him in greater jeopardy of be hanged in order to try to save him, but your scheme fortunately failed.†



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 151
Date: Oct 3 1:26 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

We've just seen this episode in Australia, and ...oh dear.

The deviations off story in the first episode were quite bearable, but this episode was chock-a-block with wrong things. As mentioned, Elizabeth being there and Demelza telling her of the pregnancy, added to various other things.

But the biggest gripe I have, is Demelza's meeting with Judge Lister. In the book, I love the way she manages to build a rapport with him over church music and other cultural things, with barely the merest hint of discussing how trials are judged. She leaves the assembly with the Judge having no idea that she is related to the man on his court list. He realises it during the trial, but being the extremely righteous man he is, she believes it has made no difference. Bringing George into it (who I believe was not even at that gathering) ruined the whole feel of the incident.

About the trial overall, I think DH pulled out all the amibiguity and subtlety, and hit the viewer over the head with the scenes. She makes it look like the jury acted totally contrary to the evidence, whereas in reality there was evidence both for and against Ross. Having cut out the Clemmow's storyline, she then had to cut out Ross's best attack where he shredded their evidence and proved that the defence had pulled witnesses who weren't even there.

And Ross's final speech. The book Ross, in the end, creates a speech that partially includes his own viewpoint, but bookends it with the grovelling that Clymer is pushing. He never loses his temper and yells at the jury, but speaks clearly to the actual charges. DH has done Ross no justice in her writing of this scene.

Finally, DH totally neglects to allow Judge Lister to have the final say. It was so unresolved to just let them all walk out of the courthouse, without him giving his judgement, especially where he shows that he would not have let him off lightly and that Ross should be very careful not to come before the law again (which speaks to the decision to be involved in smuggling).

The final straw is Francis and Elizabeth giving each other cow's eyes at the end. Unbelievable.

Episode three had better be much better.



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 127
Date: Sep 20 1:00 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Mrs. G,†

I agree. I think Mary Wimbush and Paul Curran were always going to be hard acts to beat. It's a shame that the new series and the media have to fall back on Jud's 'tedn right, tedn proper' to inject his character with some comedy. (Also, have they changed this in the new series to 'tint right?' If so I'm pretty sure that's from my neck of the woods, Yorkshire...)

Shame about the Gimletts. They play a much bigger role in the books than is generally supposed.†

Morwenna



__________________

A sudden warmth flooded the cove ...and he knew he was home.



Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Online
Posts: 671
Date: Sep 20 9:57 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

You are absolutely correct to say how wonderful the Gimletts are!!

My real quibble with their omission is this;† if the whole 12 books are to be televised, John and Jane Gimlett become very important.† Ross and Demelza could never have gone off to London, or anywhere else for that matter, if the Gimletts†hadn't been working hard in the background keeping the wheels turning at Nampara.† Also, Jane was instrumental in the smooth running of the household when Demelza was still young.† She helped to educate her in more genteel ways - something Prudie could never have done.

I agree in the books Jud and Prudie are a continuous rumble of complaint and comedy, but this is exceptionally hard to portray on screen, partly because of all their malapropisms, which would be unintelligible to much of the audience, especially delivered in a Cornish accent. This is borne out by the unsuccessful attempt of the current 'Jud and Prudie' who, excellent actors as they may be, just miss the mark.† Only my opinion of course.† In fact, a friend has said the 1975 version of the couple seemed to have been more accurately portrayed.



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Tuesday 20th of September 2016 09:58:49 AM

__________________


Initiate

Status: Offline
Posts: 92
Date: Sep 19 10:03 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

I don't quite agree about it being wrong that Demelza told Elizabeth of her pregnancy - she had only just realised she was pregnant, so would have been feeling very emotional at that point, and then Elizabeth mentions Julia.†

Also, I can see why the Gimletts have been cut - they were too hard-working and well-behaved! Jud and Prudie are much more entertainment value, and to have them off down in their shack in Grambler would have made their interactions with the Nampara household too bitty. And Jud being obsequious was just so funny!†



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 176
Date: Sep 15 4:27 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Mrs Gimlett wrote:

Thoughts on last Sunday's offering, please.

I was quite surprised how involved Elizabeth was, firstly in going to Bodmin - a slight stretch of credulity, as she would never have reached the court in time - but no matter.† Also was astonished that Demelza told her she is again pregnant.† Demelza, who never told anyone until absolutely necessary, even Ross.† It was rather a†strange way of imparting the information on screen.† I cannot imagine Demelza ever confiding in Elizabeth; Verity, yes -†that would have been more likely.

Debbie seems to be going off-piste with this series.† I do hope it is all back on track very soon.†


I too found the scene between Demelza and Elizabeth, a suspension of belief and yes, Demelza would have told Verity before she would have told Elizabeth. Actually, the whole Elizabeth going to Bodmin, due to concern for Francis, irked me. I was very hopeful that at the end of the first season that Elizabeth's true nature would be revealed in the second season and I am still waiting for that to happen.

I did enjoy the scene between Dwight and Francis, it was very much how I picture it from the book and Jud on the witness stand too, was much how I imagined it. The trial scenes were very good but I really didn't care for the addition of Tom Carne's ranting in the courtroom. I enjoyed the banter between Caroline and Dwight as well but not the scenes with Demelza and Judge Lister.

I am sorry that the Nampara Poldarks will be without their faithful retainers once again, the Gimletts will be missed.

Mrs. Martin



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 227
Date: Sep 14 8:39 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

SERIES 2 SPOILER ALERT

The following has come my way. It also includes summaries of episodes 1 and 2 which are accurate but there seems no point in posting them. So it's looking like 4 episodes on book 3 and 6 on book 4.

"Sunday 18†September 2016, 9pm

Ross (Aidan Turner) plans to expand Wheal Leisure and persuades the other shareholders to invest in a new tunneling scheme.

Meanwhile, Unwin Trevaunance (Hugh Skinner) decides that he will plant his political flag by cracking down on lawlessness, particularly smuggling. Demelza (Eleanor Tomlinson) continues to hide her pregnancy from Ross, believing that he does not want the child.

With the interest now due on the promissory note Ross secured from Pascoe, Ross and Demelza have to find £400. Jud (Phil Davis) is attacked for recanting his testimony in court and left for dead. Ross accepts Francis (Kyle Soller) invitation to spend the Harvest festival at Trenwith, united now by a shared hatred of George Warleggan.

Francis reveals to Ross he has £600 set aside which he plans to invest in mining. Dr Dwight Enys (Luke Norris) is called to Killewarren and discovers that Caroline (Gabriella Wilde) has a fishbone lodged in her throat. He removes it, impressing her, but on his way home discovers that George (Jack Farthing) has acquired more shares in Wheal Leisure.

Later, Elizabeth reveals that George gave Francis the £600, making Ross suspicious as to Georges purpose. Demelza overhears the pair flirting before going to bed where Ross joins her. They argue and Demelza reveals that she is pregnant.

Episode 4

Sunday 25†September 2016, 9pm

Ross begins to think that exiled miner Mark Daniel might have come across a copper lode when hiding out in Wheal Grace.
Meanwhile, knowing he could bankrupt them at any time, Elizabeth (Heida Reed, pictured) attempts to keep George (Jack Farthing) sweet but finds his proposition to spend more time together behind Francis back too high a price.

Caroline (Gabriella Wilde) thinks to impress Dwight by buying oranges for his patients and succeeds. Meanwhile Trencrom (Richards McCabe), the local crime-lord, offers Ross £200 to allow him to use Nampara Cove for smuggling and Ross invites Demelzas anger by accepting.

When George shows up at the Wheal Leisure shareholder meeting and attempts to come between Ross and his cousin, he and Ross end up coming to blows.

Returning home, Ross discovers Demelza struggling to get ashore in the throes of labour. Can he reach her in time?"

Stella



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Wednesday 14th of September 2016 08:56:12 PM

__________________


Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Online
Posts: 671
Date: Sep 14 7:12 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

I think you may find, Morwenna, that if there is a 'wake' scene it will be in the current series.



__________________


Student

Status: Offline
Posts: 127
Date: Sep 14 10:35 AM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Mrs Gimlett,

I've heard Jud is being cut from Series 3 anyway, but Prudie will stay. Which will be a shame if the comical wake scene is cut.


Morwenna

__________________

A sudden warmth flooded the cove ...and he knew he was home.



Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

Status: Online
Posts: 671
Date: Sep 13 5:53 PM, 2016
Permalink  
 

Thoughts on last Sunday's offering, please.

I was quite surprised how involved Elizabeth was, firstly in going to Bodmin - a slight stretch of credulity, as she would never have reached the court in time - but no matter.† Also was astonished that Demelza told her she is again pregnant.† Demelza, who never told anyone until absolutely necessary, even Ross.† It was rather a†strange way of imparting the information on screen.† I cannot imagine Demelza ever confiding in Elizabeth; Verity, yes -†that would have been more likely.

Debbie seems to be going off-piste with this series.† I do hope it is all back on track very soon.†

I do wonder if they are going to rush through book 3 and devote much more time to book 4, which does have a fair amount of action throughout.

I will now put the kettle on and await your opinions.

Old Ma G

ps† It also looks as though Jud and Prudie are going to be 're-employed'!† The Gimlett's are definitely not in favour†



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.