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Post Info TOPIC: First Editions and extra text


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Date: Feb 19 3:59 PM, 2016
RE: First Editions and extra text
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Stella Stanton wrote:

Mrs Martin

This is very useful, especially in the format you have chose. It highlights how little we learn from the subsequent editions and how the first editions give the full picture. Suddenly everything makes sense and many of the questions we have are answered! For example, it is much clearer how Elizabeth leads Ross on, only to reject him when he rises to the bait. She was a very cruel and selfish woman I think.


Thanks Stella. 

This conversation between Ross and Elizabeth in the first edition clearly indicates Elizabeth's feelings for Ross and why she married Francis. It also answers the question about the outcome of a Ross and Elizabeth marriage. 

 We could not be happy together, we are not the right temperament to blend, to live in amity. With Francis it was different. We were not children but grown people. Our tastes were the same and we loved each other. 

You are correct it shows how Elizabeth plays with Ross' emotions: "You invite me to stay and weep when I go.

I'm not sure if Elizabeth is trying to be cruel but you are right she is a selfish woman. She doesn't want Ross but she wants his love and admiration.  I think one of the main characteristic Elizabeth has is her vanity and her need to be admired. She needs Ross' admiration to bolster her own self image. It is a recurring theme in the books, the moment that admiration is threaten, the moment Elizabeth feels that Ross' admiration is waning or going elsewhere, she does everything in her power to refocus it again on her. At Julia's christening, the Christmas after Ross' aquittal, she dressed to impress and finally at the party when she made her confession to Ross. How did that conversation start?

Elizabeth said in an undertone to Ross "'She's lovely, isn't she?"

"Very striking. Beauty's a matter of taste.'"

"Is it true, do you think, that what the eye doesn't admire the heart doesn't desire?"

At the party where Caroline is introduced to the local society. Again Elizabeth concerned that Ross' admiration might focus on someone other than herself so she pulls it back by confessing that she thought she loved Francis more than Ross.

A very selfish woman indeed.



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Date: Feb 17 12:49 PM, 2016
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Mrs Martin

This is very useful, especially in the format you have chose. It highlights how little we learn from the subsequent editions and how the first editions give the full picture. Suddenly everything makes sense and many of the questions we have are answered! For example, it is much clearer how Elizabeth leads Ross on, only to reject him when he rises to the bait. She was a very cruel and selfish woman I think.



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Date: Feb 15 1:43 AM, 2016
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The edited discussion between Ross and Elizabeth.

 

She looked down at the spinning wheel. "Ross," she said in a low voice.

"My coming here upsets you."

She did not move. "I'll meet them on the way back," he said, rising.

She did not answer. Then she looked up and her eyes were heavy with tears. She picked up the woollen thread she had been spinning and the tears dropped on her hands. He sat down again with a sensation as if he was falling off a cliff. Talking to save himself, he said: "At the fair yesterday I picked up a girl, a child; she had been ill treated by her father. I needed someone to help Prudie in the house; she was afraid to go home; I brought her back to Nampara. I shall keep her as a kitchen maid. I don't know the law of the matter. Elizabeth, why are you crying?"

She said: "How old is the girl?"

"Thirteen. I-"

"I should send her back. It would be safer even if you had her father's permission. You know how hard people are judged."

"I shall not come here again," Ross said. "I upset you-to no purpose."

She said: "It's not your coming-

"What am I to think, then?"

"It only hurts me to feel that you hate me."

He twisted his riding crop round and round. "You know I don't hate you. Good God, you should know that-"

She broke the thread.

"Since I met you," he said, "I've had no eyes and no thought for any other girl. When I was away, nothing mattered about my coming back but this. If there was one thing I was sure of, it wasn't what I'd been taught by anyone else to believe, not what I learned from other people was the truth but the truth that I felt in myself-about you."

"Don't say any more." She had gone very white. But for once her frailness did not stop him.

It had to come out now. "It isn't very pretty to have been made a fool of by one's own feelings," he said. "To take childish promises and build a-a castle out of them. And yet- even now sometimes I can't believe that all the things we said to each other were so trivial or so immature. Are you sure you felt so little for me as you pretend? D'you remember that day in your father's garden when you slipped away from them and met me in the summerhouse? That day you said-"

"You forget yourself," she whispered, forcing the words out.

"Oh no I don't. I remember you."

All the conflicting feeling inside her suddenly found an outlet. The mixed motives for asking him in; the liking, the affection, the feminine curiosity, the piqued pride; they suddenly merged into indignation to keep out some thing stronger. She was as much alarmed at her own feelings as indignant with him; but the situation had to be saved somehow.

She said: "I was wrong to ask you to stay. It was because I wanted your friendship, nothing more."

"I think you must have your feelings under a very good control. You turn them about and face them the way you want them to be. I wish I could do that. What's the secret?"

Trembling, she left the spinning wheel and went to the door.

"I'm married," she said. "It isn't fair to Francis to speak as you- as we are doing. I'd hoped that we could still be good neighbours- and good friends. We live so close- could help each other. But you can forget nothing and forgive nothing. Perhaps I'm expecting too much....I don't know. But, Ross, ours was a boy-and-girl attachment. I was very fond of you and still am. But you went away and I met Francis, and with Francis it was different. I loved him. I'd grown up. We were not children but grown people. Then came the word that you were dead.... When you came back I was so happy; and so very sorry that I'd not been able to-to keep faith with you. If there'd been any way of making it up to you, I'd gladly have done it. I wished that we still should be close friends, and thought...Until today I thought that we could. But after this-"

"After this it's better that we shouldn't be." He came up to the door and put his hand on it.

Her eyes were dry enough now and exceptionally dark. "For some time," she said, "this is goodbye. "

"It's goodbye." He bent and kissed her hand. She shrank from his touch as if he was unclean. He thought he had become repulsive to her. She went with him to the front door, where Darkie whinnied at the sight of him.

"Try to understand," Elizabeth said. "I love Francis and married him. If you could forget me, it would be better. There's no more I can say than that."

He mounted the mare and looked down at her. "Yes," he agreed. "There's no more to say." He saluted and rode away, leaving her standing in the dark of the doorway.

 

The unedited version.

 

She looked down at the spinning wheel. "Ross," she said in a low voice. "please, please...."

"My coming here upsets you."

She did not move.

"I'll meet them on the way back," he said, rising.

She did not answer. Then she looked up and her eyes were heavy with tears. She picked up the woollen thread she had been spinning and the tears dropped on her hands.

He sat down again with a sensation as if he was falling off a cliff. He had not seen her cry before. Not like this. Against it he had no defences.

Talking to save himself, he said: "At the fair yesterday I picked up a girl, a child; she had been ill treated by her father. I needed someone to help Prudie in the house; she was afraid to go home; I brought her back to Nampara. I shall keep her as a kitchen maid. I don't know the law of the matter. Elizabeth, why are you crying?"

"Not crying," she said: "How old is the girl?"

"Thirteen. I - "

Elizabeth wiped the back of her hands. "I should send her back. It would be safer even if you had her father's permission. You know how hard people are judged."

"I shall not come here again," Ross said. "I upset you - to no purpose."

She said: "It's not your coming.  I like you to come. But don't be bitter, viciously bitter. It hurts so to feel that you hate me." 

He twisted his riding crop round and round and the blackness came upon him again. "You know I don't hate you. You know - you of all people should know that I love you.

She broke the thread.

"Since I met you," he said, "I've had no eyes and no thought no lips for any other woman. When I was away there was always one thought, one looking forward. There was not much certainty in that life. Maybe there is little in any. But if there was one thing I was certain of it was not what I been taught to believe not what I had learned from other people was the truth, it was what I felt in my own body and my spirit with a sureness I couldn't begin to doubt.

"Ross, please..."  She had gone very white. But for once her frailness did not stop him.

"I thought," he said,  "that such feeling as mine must keep alive a feeling in return. There lay the error. You have the right to choose whom you shall have for husband. Childish promises have not enduring quality. And yet," he went on, " every bone in me, every breath I take, refuses the idea that all my love can evaporate into air. Call me an egoist. But is nature so blind, so dead to its own end, that it can create in me such a need of you that everything is void without you, and yet leave you cold and untouched. Perhaps it can; but does it where a fire, even a gentle fire, has one burned? Do embers hold no heat? The fuel must have been poor to leave only grey ash...."

"Ross!" She had come to her feet and had a hand on her heart. " you mustn't speak like that"

"You invite me to stay and weep when I go. Do you remember that day in your father's garden when you slipped away from them and met me in the summerhouse and let your head lie on my shoulder? That day you said -"

"You forget yourself," she whispered, forcing the words out.

"On the contrary. I remember you."

All the conflicting feeling inside her suddenly found an outlet. The mixed motives for asking him in; the liking, the affection, the feminine curiosity, the piqued pride; they suddenly merged into indignation to keep out some thing stronger. She was as much alarmed at her own feelings as indignant with him; but the situation had to be saved somehow.

"Please go," she said: "I was wrong to ask you to stay. It was because I wanted your friendship, nothing more. Go now."

"Can one dismiss one's thoughts so easily? I wish I could now. Obedient company."

Trembling, she left the spinning wheel and went to the door. "I'm married," she said. "It isn't fair to Francis or to me to speak as you have done. It is not fair to yourself,  Ross.  I had hoped that we might see more of you, that we might become good neighbours and good friends. We live so close. We could be of help and companionship to each other. But you - cannot forget. You can forget nothing and forgive nothing. Ours was a boy and girl attachment. I was - very, very fond of you. You went away and I met Francis. I love him. I had grown up. We could not be happy together, we are not the right temperament to blend, to live in amity. With Francis it was different. We were not children but grown people. Our tastes were the same and we loved each other. Then came the word that you were dead. When you came back I was so happy and so deeply sorry that I had not been able to keep faith with you. If there had been any way to make amends I would have made them. I wished that we should be close friends. Until to-day I believe that we could. But - if you are like this I can't see you again. Not ever." 

"I am sure that will be best for all of us," he said "My friendship with Francis is deep and of long standing, but friendship have a frailty when a woman comes between. So sometimes have marriage vows, however well meant. However well meant. I love you, Elizabeth and that is dangerous. It may not be possible always to think of new insults to add to old. "

He came to the door and put his hand upon it. Her eyes were dry now and exceptionally dark, as if she been looking into depths within herself and was surprise at what she saw.

"For some time," she said, "this is good-bye."

"It's good-bye." He bent and kissed her hand. She shrank from his touch as if he was unclean. He thought that he had become repulsive to her. 

She went with him to the front door, where Darkie whinnied at the sight of him. 

"Try to understand." Elizabeth said. "There is nothing more I can ask. I love Francis and married him. If you could forget me it would be better.  There is no more that I can say than that.

He mounted the mare and looked down at her. He realized that if he did not go she would be in danger of fainting

"Yes," he agreed. "There is no more to say."

He saluted and rode away, having her standing in the dark of the doorway.

 

What a difference, it changes the perception of Elizabeth reasons for marrying Francis and her rejection of Ross.



-- Edited by MrsMartin on Thursday 18th of February 2016 03:25:06 PM

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Date: Jan 7 9:53 PM, 2016
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Good luck with your searching for those elusive first editions.  It is worth it though - I found my Demelza at a jumble sale! That was some while ago though.

i am a bit pushed for time this week now, but hopefully I can get some bits printed out for you next week.

Yes there are extra bits in JP.  But not much as I recall about Francis and his time in Bodmin.  Must check - again it will be next week before I get round to it.

Cheers for now



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Date: Jan 7 7:20 PM, 2016
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Hello Mrs Gimlett

Thanks so much for your prompt reply. I have been given a link to a seller who has a set of the first editions of the first four books. Tomorrow I shall be contacting this seller and hope I'm not too late. I shall look where you suggest but it may not be necessary for me to do this. If I'm lucky perhaps I can post some of what I have asked you for. I appreciate it's a heavy task but I would be happy to do it.

With thanks

Stella Stanton



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Date: Jan 5 9:48 PM, 2016
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Does anyone know if there is any missing text from Jeremy, regarding Francis suicide attempt and his discussion with Dwight? If there is, I would be very interested in reading it. 



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Date: Jan 5 7:45 PM, 2016
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Hello Stella,

There are a great many extra bits in Demelza and it would be a mammoth task to put them all down in one go.  However, if you search for the posts about the 'first editions' you will find some of them.

Meanwhile, I'll try to find time to pick out some of the best bits for you.

I'm back in circulation after a prolonged period of visitors.

Old Ma G



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Date: Dec 31 11:52 AM, 2015
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Sent you a pm....



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Date: Dec 29 8:08 PM, 2015
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I have managed to buy first editions of Ross Poldark and Jeremy Poldark. Is it possible for someone to post the parts of Demelza that were in the first edition but which have subsequently been removed. Obviously I have the missing chapter 6 but I believe there are many other changes. I have tried so far unsuccessfully to get a copy of the 1946 Ward Lock version. I intend to continue my search but meanwhile I would be grateful to have this which will, I believe help to answer some of the questions I have about the main characters.

Stella Stanton

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Date: Oct 16 10:26 PM, 2015
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Hi Ross,

 

Thank you so much for responding so promptly. So I will have to look for the House of Stratos publication because I can't afford the $1500.00 USD, first edition I found online.



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Date: Oct 16 9:30 PM, 2015
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In the first edition of Ross Poldark (1945) by "Ward Lock", the original publisher, there's 352 pages.

There was a Ross Poldark (only) printed in about 2002 by the House of Stratos which I gather was a copy of the original unedited one, but I've still no idea if this is true or not....



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Student

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Date: Oct 16 6:35 PM, 2015
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Could someone please tell me how many pages are in the first edition of Ross Poldark? I have heard that this version has been re-issued in 2002, is this true?



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Date: Oct 13 5:08 PM, 2015
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Yes.  Very Interested.



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Date: Oct 13 4:06 PM, 2015
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Keep meaning to read them again so yes good incentive....aww



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Student

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Date: Oct 12 2:10 PM, 2015
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Thank you very much Mrs Gimlett, I for one would be very interested in reading and discussing those threads. In fact, I will be heading over there now.


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Date: Oct 12 9:58 AM, 2015
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For those members newer to the forum, you can read many of the pieces edited out of later editions by clicking on search on the above bar and enter 'First Editions'.  Also, when we started the 'book club', in which we discussed each chapter in some depth, a number of 'extra' texts were used. This editing only covers the first four books.   

The only other books that contain all the original text were published by House of Stratus.  I am not sure how many books were done, but do know that Demelza was not one of them.  These copies, which were cheap paperbacks, used to be available on a well-known website at one time, but now, with all the new interest in the books, they may be less easily come by.

We could pick up the book club again - it would be good to discuss the two books which have already been covered by the new TV series and will keep us out of mischief until the next series airs.

Anyone interested?  Read the threads we have already discussed.  Any member is welcome to add to or comment on what has been written.



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