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Post Info TOPIC: Book Endings


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Date: Apr 20 4:38 PM, 2017
RE: Book Endings
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Those gaps are fascinating to fill in. That's probably why there's so much "fan-fic" written - about 500 on one website alone.  



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Date: Apr 19 11:39 PM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote: 

Now I know we all think WG wrote brilliant books but on a long car journey recently I was pondering which of the 12 books has the least satisfactory ending.

As connoisseurs, which book would you have liked to see extended a little just to get a better insight into the final chapters of each novel?  The first four all end with scenes of Ross and Demelza and  in Warleggan I would love to have had a few more pages about that night after the argument - or would I?  Winston  knows just when to stop and leave the imagination to take over but just occasionally I would love to be a fly on the wall for that little bit longer.

Any thoughts about it?

Well I've been thinking about this for a while and, for me, The Four Swans is that book. Although there was only a year between the publication of TFS and TAT much was left up in the air.

TFS ends on an optimistic note and gives the impression that healing between R&D was in progress. Yet, contradicting this, WG opens TAT with Ross' hurt and anger over Demelza's betrayal with HA still raw and festering as he questions whether or not their marriage can continue. The months he spent in London did nothing to dull his anguish.   

So, what happened after their apparent reconciliation at the end of TFS? Did Demelza continue to openly grieve for Hugh and did this exacerbate their estrangement? Would he, having been sympathetic to a fault throughout most of her HA involvement, have quit their bedroom to give her time to privately deal with her grief?

They would of course have gone to Hugh's funeral. Ross would not have wanted to go and probably would have been relieved for Demelza to accompany the Enys, but his absence would have been conspicuous, especially since he was considered a family friend and Lord Falmouth's new protégé. Would the emotional strain of the funeral have challenged their relationship even more?   

Lord Falmouth was planning a ball for the newly elected MPs. Would Demelza have felt up to accompanying Ross? More importantly, would Ross have wanted her to?

News about Ross' election would have spread pretty fast. The suspenseful drama of the election itself was WG at his nail-biting best and I cheered when George was defeated once again. Ross' friends, especially Caroline, would have been very pleased. Caroline would have chided him about his self-mockery of the victory and his new status. Verity of course would have been ecstatic. Again, I'm not sure Demelza would have been emotionally capable of experiencing real pleasure in Ross' victory.

Ross was clearly happy to have a reason to leave Cornwall. Was anything definite discussed at his departure?



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Date: Feb 21 7:42 PM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

It's interesting that the books endings which leave things hanging in the air are the very books where there's a large gap before the next book.

After Warleggan was the longest wait, without really knowing how R&D resolved their problems.  Then we had to wait four years after The Angry Tide, which again had R&D in torment, but with no prospect of Elizabeth coming between them again. 

There was a small gap of two years before we knew how both Jeremy and Clowance's love lives would play out.  After they had committed themselves many thought that was the end of the story; most things had been resolved - some less satisfactorily than others - when along came The Twisted Sword, six years later.  Just like The Black Moon, the story continued as though no time gap existed (a tribute to WG for being able to pick up where he left things).  It was written as the final book and threw the Poldark's world upside down.  However, despite the turmoil, I tend to think the ending is a good one. An appropriate ending.  I think readers were quite surprised when, 12 years later, WG produced another plump volume, the longest book of the lot. 

We are left very much to our own imaginations after Bella P. 

I wonder if Harry married a lovely Cornish girl and produced several children.   When I walk the cliffs along the north coast, I shall keep a lookout for anyone with Poldark looks.  Who knows, his descendants might still be living , just over the next cliff in that hollow almost on the beach...


 Mrs G   I did not know that The Twisted Sword was intended as the last Poldark book. Perhaps it would have been better were it so. I do not like the end of Bella at all. Apart from Clowance and Edward, Drake and Morwenna and Sam and Rosina, life seems quite bleak for the others, especially the main characters. As you say, we are left to our imaginations which, for a final book, is far from satisfactory or fair. WG should have shown more thought and care for his followers and given us some reassurances. With reference to Ross' four possible reactions to an indefinite ending (like, accept,, be left uncomfortably undecided, somewhere in the middle or dislike) I would have to say that, although I accept the ending, for what else can one do,  I dislike it especially how it leaves Ross and Demelza.

 



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Tuesday 21st of February 2017 07:43:59 PM



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Tuesday 21st of February 2017 07:45:43 PM



-- Edited by Stella Poldark on Tuesday 21st of February 2017 08:00:07 PM

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Date: Feb 21 6:07 PM, 2017
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It's interesting that the books endings which leave things hanging in the air are the very books where there's a large gap before the next book.

After Warleggan was the longest wait, without really knowing how R&D resolved their problems.  Then we had to wait four years after The Angry Tide, which again had R&D in torment, but with no prospect of Elizabeth coming between them again. 

There was a small gap of two years before we knew how both Jeremy and Clowance's love lives would play out.  After they had committed themselves many thought that was the end of the story; most things had been resolved - some less satisfactorily than others - when along came The Twisted Sword, six years later.  Just like The Black Moon, the story continued as though no time gap existed (a tribute to WG for being able to pick up where he left things).  It was written as the final book and threw the Poldark's world upside down.  However, despite the turmoil, I tend to think the ending is a good one. An appropriate ending.  I think readers were quite surprised when, 12 years later, WG produced another plump volume, the longest book of the lot. 

We are left very much to our own imaginations after Bella P. 

I wonder if Harry married a lovely Cornish girl and produced several children.   When I walk the cliffs along the north coast, I shall keep a lookout for anyone with Poldark looks.  Who knows, his descendants might still be living , just over the next cliff in that hollow almost on the beach...



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Date: Jan 19 9:10 PM, 2017
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I remember the gap between Book 7 and 8, mainly because I remember my Mum being so, so excited about a new Poldark coming. Because of the jump in chronology between those books, it is easier to get a sense of change.

I now remember the end of Black Moon (just finished last night), and compared to the first four books, the last two chapters are quite depressing. Morwenna enters her darkest hours, Drake loses hope, and George seems to win. Things are good for R&D and Caroline and Dwight, though, at this point.

In answer to the original post, this is my least favourite ending so far, but is it the least "satisfactory"? Hard to judge, knowing the story that comes after. It makes me want to get moving on Four Swans straight away.



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Date: Jan 19 9:42 AM, 2017
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SPOILER - CONTAINS INFO ABOUT BOOK 6

 

It was agony to wait for that next book, Fijane!  I only had to wait 10 years, but there was great excitement when it was known WG had returned to Nampara.  After The Angry Tide we had another pause, but each one was well worth it.

 

I love the ending of The Four Swans.  That conversation between R&D makes one feel they have reached a new stage in their marriage, where talking things through becomes easier for Ross.  It is in danger of becoming slightly saccharine, until the appearance of a certain little girl.  That's the genius of WG - as in life, always a contrast.



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Date: Jan 18 10:17 PM, 2017
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I have never had to wait to read The Black Moon straight after Warleggan, but it must have been agony for readers to not know what would happen to Dwight for 20 years. I am just re-reading the end of Black Moon (where the storyline revolves around Dwight) and marvelling at how brilliantly this section is written. Despite the fact that I have read it about ten times, I still can't put the book down until the action is somewhat resolved. i don't remember exactly where this book ends, but I think this is one of the greatest "last quarter" of any of the books.



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Date: Jan 17 9:30 AM, 2017
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Ah Hollyhock, Ross was at long last tipsy on the relief of success. He could enjoy spending some money without worry.  Even though at that point he and Demelza were unable to revel in it together, he was hoping to entice her into that feeling of euphoria.  I think, judging by the first time we meet them in the Black Moon, he entirely succeeded.

WG was so clever leaving the discovery of tin until there was a crisis of another type to be set against the good.  He knew that life is not all rosy and happily ever after and portrayed the lives of his characters so readers recognise the ups and downs, worries and delights, which reflect their own lives.  Very few people lead a charmed life and many of those are not happy. 

As Ross says, life is all contrast and we need some dark times to better appreciate the light.

 

I'm just of to my philosophy class now!! biggrin



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Date: Jan 17 1:34 AM, 2017
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Mrs Gimlett wrote:

Have I read you right here?  You expect Ross would help with preparing rooms for the guests?  However enlightened he was Ross would not expect to do that; the Gimletts were on hand for that type of job. (Always there when needed!) And he had thought to bring some food - more than some husbands might do... even today.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mrs Gimlett--I agree. Also, with every reading I'm surprised that with all that was going on Ross thought to buy food for supper. And like Demelza, with all his London purchases, I'm surprised he had enough money to get home.   

 

 

 



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Date: Jan 16 10:31 PM, 2017
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Dark Mare wrote:

The Demelza I know and love is too proud to let a catty rich girl feast on their marital problems.

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Dark Mare,

Demelza had recently learned that Caroline had so unselfishly saved her family from utter ruin and Ross from prison or transportation.  And she had done this anonymously, with absolutely no ulterior motive.  Caroline can be flippant, occasionally thoughtless, and like Ross, arrogant, but "catty" is not part of her nature.  Caroline was so happy to be re-united with Dwight that R&D could have slept on the roof and she would not have noticed.    



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Date: Jan 16 4:34 PM, 2017
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Dark Mare wrote:

It's funny, when I was reading the end of "Warleggan" for the first time, I was surprised by Demelza's willingness to accept the three houseguests without demanding two things from Ross:

1. His help in making the house ready for the visitors. ("You just dropped three houseguests into my lap without notice. You don't get to dash off to Trenwith to avoid helping us. George will be there on Boxing Day. You can punch him then.")

2. That he move himself and all his stuff out of his father's old bedroom -- the room Caroline will be using -- and into their room for the duration of Caroline's stay. Her husband is not sleeping on a cot in the box room. The Demelza I know and love is too proud to let a catty rich girl feast on their marital problems. 



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Monday 16th of January 2017 01:07:02 PM


Have I read you right here?  You expect Ross would help with preparing rooms for the guests?  However enlightened he was Ross would not expect to do that; the Gimletts were on hand for that type of job. (Always there when needed!) And he had thought to bring some food - more than some husbands might do... even today.

He went to Trenwith that night in the spirit of, if not friendship, neighbourliness, in a hope of settling his irritation with their living so close. 

I don't think he ever set out with violence in mind, when he encountered George - he was just pent up and on edge because they had such a history of rubbing each other up the wrong way.

Your second point, I cannot quite see if you think Demelza should have insisted he shared her room on another bed (to keep up a show), or if you think that is what happened. 

Ross suggests that his bed can be set up in the little room behind where Dwight is going to sleep. 

Caroline would not have had a clue where either of them were sleeping - she didn't know the layout of the house, or how many rooms there were.  As I said below, even if she found they were sleeping in separate rooms, it would have meant nothing, as that was the norm in many houses at the time.

 

 



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Monday 16th of January 2017 04:38:05 PM



-- Edited by Mrs Gimlett on Monday 16th of January 2017 04:39:30 PM

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Date: Jan 16 12:53 PM, 2017
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It's funny, when I was reading the end of "Warleggan" for the first time, I was surprised by Demelza's willingness to accept the three houseguests without demanding two things from Ross:

1. His help in making the house ready for the visitors. ("You just dropped three houseguests into my lap without notice. You don't get to dash off to Trenwith to avoid helping us. George will be there on Boxing Day. You can punch him then.")

2. That he move himself and all his stuff out of his father's old bedroom -- the room Caroline will be using -- and into their room for the duration of Caroline's stay. Her husband is not sleeping on a cot in the box room. The Demelza I know and love is too proud to let a catty rich girl feast on their marital problems. 



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Monday 16th of January 2017 01:07:02 PM

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Date: Jan 16 9:24 AM, 2017
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Slight Spoiler if you have read no further than Book 4

 

I think we can take it as (un)read that Ross returns to the bedroom PDQ after the incident in the still room!

Interesting, because Dwight and Caroline were staying that night, and Ross' makeshift bed had been made up in some box room or other.  D&C would have had no inkling of what had gone on previously (since they didn't display their behaviour for all to see {unlike the TV series}) so would have naturally assumed they shared a bedroom.

Or perhaps they wouldn't necessarily assume that.  Husband and wife did not always sleep in the same bed in those days.  Francis and Elizabeth didn't, neither did George and Elizabeth or George and Harriet.  But of course they had many more bedrooms to choose from.  However, I fancy that however many bedrooms R&D had, they would always sleep together.



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Date: Jan 16 9:06 AM, 2017
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Forget my last post. I found the last chapter and it was lovely. I am satisfied now. 



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Date: Jan 16 8:19 AM, 2017
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I have just finished Warleggan and I am not satisfied with the ending. Ross is still sleeping separate from Demelza. Do they ever return to full conjugal love in any of the sequel books?  Is the film series Season 2 last episode with Ross declaring his love for Demelza completely  made up by the film writers?  If so I am disappointed in this book. 



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Date: Feb 26 9:32 AM, 2013
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Ais I bla....wink



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Date: Feb 25 11:11 PM, 2013
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Ahhhh Captain, you just be and old romantic like me.....

 

Bella



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Date: Feb 25 8:49 PM, 2013
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Haven't had a chance to read through all the endings yet, but I agree about needing something at the end of Warleggan to leave things more settled after the argument. However as there's no change between the first edition and the later Sixties' copies, I think this issue can only be seen from the viewpoint of those who would have read just the first four books alone in between times. And had I been one of those readers, I think at the end I would have fairly soon concluded that it was obviously the way WG wanted to end his long love triangle story, though perhaps strange in view of the books already proven strong popularity and the increasing public clamour for more of Ross and Demelza. Besides, and reading between the lines over the years, I think he'd already firmly decided long before Warleggan was published that this was going to be the moral of the story and that was going to be that. However, perhaps as a panacea, offering just a faint glimmer of hope for Ross and Demelza on the horizon.

Nevertheless I think you're right. A few more positive passages about what happened after Christmas night 1793 would certainly have helped but perhaps at the beginning of The Black Moon instead, as opening with Elizabeth having her first child in the middle of February 1794 just two months later I feel has always been just a bit too abrupt and lacking continuity.



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Date: Feb 24 6:51 PM, 2013
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You little minx, Bella!!  

 

Do you think they made it upstairs - the parlour was nice and warm......??



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Date: Feb 24 12:59 PM, 2013
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I think we should definitely have gone upstairs with Ross and Demelza at the end of Warleggan..... for at least ten pages ;)

Im just saying

 

Bella



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Date: Feb 21 12:05 PM, 2013
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Good question, it's been a long time since I read the books in full and though I remember one or two things such as the obvious big gap between Warleggan and The Black Moon will have to have a quick refresher....

 



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Date: Feb 21 10:18 AM, 2013
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Now I know we all think WG wrote brilliant books but on a long car journey recently I was pondering which of the 12 books has the least satisfactory ending. 

As connoisseurs, which book would you have liked to see extended a little just to get a better insight into the final chapters of each novel?  The first four all end with scenes of Ross and Demelza and  in Warleggan I would love to have had a few more pages about that night after the argument - or would I?  Winston  knows just when to stop and leave the imagination to take over but just occasionally I would love to be a fly on the wall for that little bit longer.

Any thoughts about it?



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