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Post Info TOPIC: Elizabeth's Little Bottle


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Date: Jan 26 5:42 PM, 2013
RE: Elizabeth's Little Bottle
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I hope I have not confused you, Dwight.  As you say there is no mention of and no scene in the books (so far as I know) where Dwight finds the bottle.  However in Bella Poldark, as you have posted below, Dr Enys thinks about the bottle he found in Elizabeth's bedroom and is stored in his cupboard.  From that we have to assume that he 'helped himself' to it during that first visit when he delivered Ursula.  The reader of course, is aware of the bottle and how it was procured all along and maybe that knowledge makes us think we have read about it.

I have only seen a few episodes of the series and while I admire the actors and what they did, I am not really enamoured by the adaptation (or what I have so far seen). A friend has the discs and when I go to visit we have occasionally watched some.  Everyone seems to think the second series is best but I am a long way from those episodes yet. Anyway, I certainly cannot comment on what happens in the series re Elizabeth's bottle.



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Date: Jan 25 8:47 PM, 2013
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It's some little time since I watched the videos, which would be a tad difficult today as the video player ha been consigned to the loft ! ! So I can't comment on what was shown in those final scenes. But I have just re-read and re-read the relevant passage at the end of "The Angry Tide", when Behenna and Dwight examined Elizabeth together, and unless I am still missing a refererence, there is no mention in this section of any bottle found or handled by Dwight. When Ross storms in after Elizabeth's death there is a mention of "a glass containing three leeches, a pair of scissors and a bottle of water and a spoon on Elizabeth's dressing table", but this bottle is obviously still there in the bedroom, and no particular relevanvce is drawn to it in the following sentences. I don't have the book to hand at the moment, but I do remember the reference to the bottle Geoffrey Charles saw in Elizabeth's old room when he first visityed with Amdora, so if THAT was THE bottle, it was still sitting there, and if indeed Dwight was seen to be raising his eyebrows at finding a bottle in the final TV scene, then that has to be down to the license taken by whoever adpted the books for the TV script. It certainly does not figure in WG's writing of the scene. Not that nearly two hundred years later it matters, but I did always wonder how the confusion arose.

Dwight



-- Edited by Dwight on Friday 25th of January 2013 08:48:03 PM

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Date: Jan 25 8:00 PM, 2013
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I  read the link (top one) below.  It seems to me that some readers may have confused the bottle procured from Dr Anselm with a quite ordinary bottle of mixture that was probably prescribed by Dr Behenna.  When Dwight attended Elizabeth and Ursula was born, he must have suspected that the bottle he came across had something to do with her rapid labour.  I have always assumed that he pocketed it, in order to examine its contents later, during that visit.  When he was called in again by Behenna  and found her suffering from gangrene, he put two and two together and decided to keep quiet about the bottle.

The conversation between Ross and Dwight in The Miller's Dance, when Ross is fretting about Demelza,  does not mention a bottle, but goes as follows;

'Do you know what I think of?' Ross said.

'No?'

'Elizabeth.'

Dwight let out a breath. 'Forget it. Forget Elizabeth. That was quite different.'

'How different?'

'It - was. She died. . . well, you know how she died.'

'I can never forget it.  Not as long as I live.  So . . .'

'Yes, but there can be no similarity bewtween the two conditions.'

'Why not?'

They stared at each other.

Dwight said: 'Take my word for it, Ross'

'But I want to know why.'

'I can't tell you.'

'Because you don't know or because what you know may not be repeated?'

Dwight lowered his eyes. 'Look, old friend; forget Elizabeth and accept my assurances that there can be no similarity.  What do you want me to do here?  Call in Dr Behenna for a second opinion?'



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Date: Jan 24 7:41 PM, 2013
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In June 2005 the top link, I remember it clearly as it was an interesting one and went on for ages....

http://poldark.activeboard.com/t3225373/the-death-of-elizabeth/

And another one on the same topic....

http://poldark.activeboard.com/t48484251/question-about-elizabeths-death/




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Date: Jan 24 6:02 PM, 2013
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Some years ago there was a thread where someone was asking where she/he had read about Dwight? finding/removing/keeping that dreadful bottle which brought about Elizabeth's tragic early death, when she was endeavouring to ensure a second "eight month" baby. I have tried to access the original thread without success, but maybe Ross can still find it ?? Anyway, at the time we could find no reference in the final pages of "The Angry Tide", nor yet any rereference in the final scenes of the final TV episode. Last evening, reading through "The Twisted Sword" I came across this reference while Valentine was quizzing Dwight about George and Elizabeth, and his, Valentine's, parentage. (Page 490 in my Macmillan Centenary edition.)

Dwight said: "Your mother was delivered prematurely of a perfectly healthy child. I delivered the child. I did not see your mother again for two days, as Dr Behenna arrived and took charge. Then when I was called in again I was appalled at the sight of her illness. Do not misunderstand me, this could not have been the result of any mistaken treatment Dr Behenna prescribed. Had I seen the complaint earlier I would have diagnosed it more quickly, but could not have halted it."

"And the complaint was?"

"I have told you, a form of blood poisoning."

"Gangrene, wasn't it? I have read books."

"A form of blood poisoning."

"Caused by what?"

Dwight thought: almost certainly by drinking part of the contents of a little botle I still have in my cupboard at home. He had no means of analysing it, but had tasted it and could make a reasonable guess at some of the ingredients. But never could he say anything of this to any human being, least of all to Elizabeth's son.

I certainly haven't come across any other reference to Dr Anselm's dread bottle, so perhaps this was the reference for which we were searching.

Dwight



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