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Post Info TOPIC: Lord Edward Fitzmaurice


Fan

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Date: Jun 9 2:07 AM, 2011
RE: Lord Edward Fitzmaurice
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You guys are to funny!  Thanks  for the warm welcome.



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Date: Jun 8 6:49 PM, 2011
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  biggrin



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Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

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Date: Jun 8 6:02 PM, 2011
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Now,  Miss Bella - don't you go inviting all and sundry to my kitchen!  I'd never get all the work done if (like Prudie) I sat and drank tea all day.....

Tis true that I have a great workload, and much as I love to hear what is going on this is still a working farm you know. 

Now if you was to come when Master Ross is here that would be different.  He would get the brandy out - and port - if Demelza was anywhere near!!

Only orange juice for you though, Bella, else you might fall out of that hammock of yours.

Jane G



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Date: Jun 8 2:40 PM, 2011
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Hello and welcome Grace, lovely to have another new member joining our happy little band of Poldarkians.  You'll love it here I'm sure.

Like a lot of you, I was delighted that Clowance agreed to marry Lord Edward in the end, I like to think that they would have enjoyed a long, romantic and very happy married life together.  I agree with Mrs G when she said that Edward was quite like Ross in some ways in that he loved Clowance for herself alone.  He was a perfect gentleman, honest, sincere, dependable, loving and kind-hearted.  He had waited so long for Clowance to be his wife, not only enduring with good grace the heart-break of her refusal of his first proposal with such great dignity, but also the torment of seeing her marry the totally unsuitable Stephen into the bargain.  

The last page in 'The Stranger From The Sea' always makes me so sad, when, after bidding Clowance goodbye, he walks up the steps of Bowood House and wanders back through the rooms to his bedroom where he reads the letter he had written to Ross asking for her hand in marriage several times before tearing it up and dropping it in the wastebin. Then, obviously in a very emotional state, he blows his nose and looks out of the window to see that the chaise carrying Clowance away from him has disappeared from sight.  This is when I knew that this young man deserved such great respect for being so honourable and when it would have been so lovely to have been able to give him a big hug and tell him it would all be OK in the end.  It was one of those happy ever after moments when Clowance eventually got the husband she deserved, Edward got the woman he loved so deeply and Ross and Demelza got the son-in-law they had always dreamed of, (even if they wouldn't admit to it!!!)  .... and they all lived happily ever after ... well, we hope so don't we?



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Tide was nearly full. Mist lay in a grey scarf along the line of the cliffs.
.. and they walked home hand in hand through the slanting shadows of the new darkness.



Administration

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Date: Jun 8 1:38 PM, 2011
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A warm welcome to the forum Grace, hope you enjoy it all and make lots of friends



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



Graduate

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Date: Jun 8 1:11 PM, 2011
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Hello

JUUUUDAS Grace......you can't be serious, reading the books in the wrong order!!! This just won't do!!!!! 'Ye be spoiling all the magic for yeself, I insist you start all over again from the beginnng, I've never heard such a thing in all me life before!!! no.gif

Always happy to meet and greet new members to the forum......oh and Mrs Gimlett....I thought you were the real deal......stop kidding Grace and put the kettle on nod.gif

Bella x

 - Edited by Bella on Wednesday 8th of June 2011 01:12:35 PM



-- Edited by Bella on Wednesday 8th of June 2011 01:13:43 PM

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Honorary Life Member. Forum Moderator

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Date: Jun 8 12:52 PM, 2011
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Welcome to Poldarkland, Grace. 

It is always good to hear new views and have comments from newcomers.  Hope you enjoy it all.

Like you, I was pleased that Clowance married Lord Edward in the end.  I think they would have been very good for each other; she with her down to earth common sense and values would enable him to lighten up a bit and indeed it seem to bring out the boyishness in him. 

I like the way that WG explores their wariness of each other in the beginning (when Edward arrives in Cornwall), and slowly develops their story.  In many ways he was quite like Ross - apart from the streak of lawlessness - in that he eschewed the division between the classes, even though his pedigree was so impeccable and he was very definitely a gentleman.  I also like to think that they went on to spend many happy years together, visiting Nampara and maybe even buying a house in Cornwall.  Demelza would have loved that.

You have to forgive us on this forum - we get quite carried away and very often forget that all the characters are fictional, although as you say, there are historical families woven into the story too.  If you get the chance to read WGs autobiography, you will find described quite a lot of the background to his wonderful series.

Jane Gimlett

 

 



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Graduate

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Date: Jun 8 12:39 PM, 2011
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Welcome Grace, always good to have a new member on board!

 

I think WG's ability to weave real characters into the fictional poldark world makes it so compelling and believable. He really is a master story teller!

I liked Edward and thought him a much better suitor for CLowance and not just for his title and money!



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Fan

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Date: Jun 8 2:32 AM, 2011
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Hello everyone, I am a new member, I am so happy to have found a group of people who enjoy the Poldark serials so much to make such a wonderful website for Poldark fans. Recently I just discovered Poldark was put on DVD and having a Netflix account I rented all the DVDs out one at a time. I enjoyed it just as much as I did ten or more years ago on VHS. Now I am reading the books all over again, but not in any order. I have enjoyed reading some of your comments on past posts and I hope you wont mind if sometime I might comment on past posts.

I have just finish reading Stranger from the Sea and am now The Angry Tide, backwards I know. Anyway I am trying to really understand what Clowance see in Stephen Carrington as compared to Lord Edward. I have never been able to warm to Stephen something about him never seems to ring true about him, he lies too easily for my taste and the fact that his name is connected to this village girl or other would make me cautious. Maybe to Clowance Stephen seems exciting and daring, he is good looking and has charisma and charm with women. Lord Edward on the other hand was the very proper English gentleman; you can never see him doing anything out of the ordinary. However I felt that Lord Edward would love Clowance for the woman that she was and never look elsewhere. I will say that I think Stephen does love Clowance but in a selfish way. Caroline thinks that these two (Edward and Clowance) would be good for each other, comparing her friendship that she has with Demelza. Well I am glad that Clowance in the end ends up with Lord Edward, just sorry that you had to experience so much heartache.

I had no idea that beside the historical people like the Prince Regent or Napoleon that some of the families in the Poldark books were real. Wow! Thanks for the info.



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Student

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Date: Jun 5 12:04 AM, 2011
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I was glad when Clowance was to marry him at last. He sounds as though he can be a bit too serious at times, but I'm sure Clowance would do her best to lighten him up somewhat.


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Date: May 30 8:22 AM, 2011
Edward's Family: Petty-Fitzmaurice
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It seems to be a pretty deadly title to hold. Edward's elder brother, the 3rd Marquess, is the Big Whig. :)

Clowance is plugged in to the power structure.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marquess_of_Lansdowne

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Petty-Fitzmaurice,_3rd_Marquess_of_Lansdowne

Marquess of Lansdowne, in the County of Somerset, is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain held by the head of the Petty-Fitzmaurice family. This branch of the family descends from the Hon. John Petty (originally John Fitzmaurice), second son of Thomas Fitzmaurice, 1st Earl of Kerry (see the Earl of Kerry for earlier history of the family), and his wife Anne, the daughter of the noted political economist Sir William Petty (whose wife had been created Baroness Shelburne and whose two sons had been created Baron Shelburne and Earl of Shelburne respectively, but who had died without heirs; see these title for more information). In 1751 he succeeded to the estates of his maternal uncle Henry Petty, 1st Earl of Shelburne, and assumed by Royal license the surname of Petty in lieu of FitzMaurice. The same year he was created Baron Dunkeron and Viscount FitzMaurice in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1753 the earldom held by his uncle was revived when he was made Earl of Shelburne, in the County of Wexford, in the Peerage of Ireland. He later represented Wycombe in the House of Commons as a Whig. In 1760 he was created Baron Wycombe, of Chepping Wycombe in the County of Buckingham, in the Peerage of Great Britain, which gave him an automatic seat in the British House of Lords.

He was succeeded by his eldest son William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne. He was a prominent statesman and served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1782 to 1783. In 1784 he was created Viscount Calne and Calston, in the County of Wiltshire, Earl of Wycombe, of Chepping Wycombe, and Marquess of Lansdowne, in the County of Somerset, in the Peerage of Great Britain. Through his first wife Lady Sophia Carteret (17451771), only daughter of Robert Carteret, 3rd Earl Granville (see the Earl Granville 1715 creation), he acquired large estates, including Lansdowne Hill near Bath, from which he took his title of Marquess. However, he is better known to history under his former title of Earl of Shelburne. He was succeeded by his son from his first marriage to Lady Sophia Carteret, the second Marquess. He sat as Whig Member of Parliament for Wycombe between 1786 and 1805.

He died childless and was succeeded by his half-brother, the third Marquess. He was the son of the first Marquess's second marriage to Lady Louisa FitzPatrick. Known as Lord Henry Petty from 1784 to 1809, he was one of the most influential Whig politicians of the first half of the 19th century. In a ministerial career spanning over fifty years he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1806 to 1807, as Home Secretary from 1827 to 1828, as Lord President of the Council from 1830 to 1834, 1835 to 1841 and 1846 to 1852 and as Minister without Portfolio from 1852 to 1858. He twice declined to become Prime Minister and refused the offer of a dukedom from Queen Victoria in 1857. In 1818 Lord Lansdowne also succeeded his cousin as fourth Earl of Kerry. His eldest son William Petty FitzMaurice, Earl of Kerry, was Member of Parliament for Calne but predeceased his father, without male issue. Lord Lansdowne was therefore succeeded by his second son, the fourth Marquess. He had already in 1856 been summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father's junior title of Baron Wycombe and served under Lord Palmerston as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from 1856 to 1858. He married as his second wife Emily Jane Mercer-Elphinstone-de Flahault, 8th Lady Nairne (see the Lord Nairne), eldest daughter of the French general and statesman Charles Joseph, comte de Flahaut, and his wife Margaret Nairne, 7th Lady Nairne.

He was succeeded by his eldest son from his second marriage, the fifth Marquess. Like his grandfather he was a prominent statesman and had an equally long ministerial career. Lord Lansdowne was Governor-General of Canada from 1883 to 1888, Viceroy of India from 1888 to 1894, Secretary of State for War from 1895 to 1900, Foreign Secretary from 1900 to 1905, Co-Leader of the Conservative Party from 1911 to 1916 and also served in the war-time coalition government as Minister without Portfolio from 1915 to 1916. In 1895 he succeeded his mother as ninth Lord Nairne. His eldest son, the sixth Marquess, sat as Unionist Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire from 1908 to 1918 and was a Senator of the Irish Free State in 1922.

On his death in 1936 he was succeeded by his second but eldest surviving son, the seventh Marquess, who was killed in action in 1944 during the Second World War, unmarried. As the third and youngest brother, Lord Edward Norman Petty-Fitzmaurice, had been killed in action only a week before, the Scottish lordship of Nairne was passed on to their eldest sister Katherine (see Lord Nairne for later history of this title). Lord Lansdowne was survived in the remaining titles by his first cousin, the eighth Marquess. He was the son of Major Lord Charles George Francis Mercer Nairne Petty-Fitzmaurice (18741914), second son of the fifth Marquess. Born George John Charles Mercer Nairne, he assumed by Decree of the Lord Lyon the additional surnames of Petty-Fitzmaurice in 1947. Lord Lansdowne sat on the Conservative benches in the House of Lords and served as Joint Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs from 1958 to 1962 and as Minister of State for Colonial Affairs from 1962 to 1964. As of 2007 the titles are held by his eldest son, the ninth Marquess, who succeeded in 1999.

The courtesy title for the Lord Lansdowne's eldest son and heir apparent alternates between Earl of Kerry and Earl of Shelburne. The family seat is Bowood House in Wiltshire. The family's former London residence was Lansdowne House in Berkeley Square.



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Date: May 2 2:25 PM, 2011
Lord Edward Fitzmaurice
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Lord Edward Fitzmaurice.



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 

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