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Post Info TOPIC: Aunt Agatha


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Date: Feb 14 11:16 PM, 2017
RE: Aunt Agatha
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Topics merged....



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 



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Date: Feb 14 7:32 PM, 2017
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I think the comment about rickets was more born out of her extreme pride in the family - that kind of weakness would certainly not run in her precious Poldarks. I'm pretty sure she had a very strong suspicion about Valentine's paternity - again, maybe in part spun from her pride in the family, her partiality for Ross, liking the idea of him being a bit of a rogue who got one over on George. As we know, the maths was a little complicated, but Elizabeth's uncharacteristic risk-taking indicates that she was trying to set the scene for a premature birth, and the convenience of a fall down a few steps when there was no-one around to see was just too much of a coincidence - and old Agatha was quite fly enough to work that one out! 



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Date: Feb 14 7:10 PM, 2017
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I came upon this little snippet the other day:-

In the Black Moon, when Valentine is in Truro suffering from rickets, it is said to be a disease that had never affected the Poldark family.  Agatha then pronounces there is 'bad blood on both sides', meaning the Chynoweths and Waleggans.  Are we to infer from this that she accepted who Valentine's parents were and her barbed remarks later on are just spur of the moment venom? 

Or did she know something more?



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Date: Nov 1 9:07 PM, 2016
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I have no problem with Agatha playing a larger role, but I don't like the halfway measure. Either make her a full player or keep her where WG put her, in the background and knowing more than anyone realizes. If she is going to be allowed to coach Elizabeth, she should be allowed to summons Ross to demand an explanation for his presence at Trenwith the other night once it becomes clear the boy needs a push.

Clearly, Agatha is supremely selfish -- she established that when morbid sore throat stalked the old house and she asked Demelza who was going to take care of her now that everyone was so sick -- so she must be willing to do whatever it takes to keep herself in Trenwith and George out of it. If that means throwing Ross' Little Bud under the bus, well, that's the way it goes. Old houses matter more than people because they last longer, right? Remember, from her perspective, life truly is too short. She can't afford any dawdling on Ross' part. Is he in or is he out?

 

 



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Date: Nov 1 3:05 PM, 2016
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There are many 'new' bits in each episode.  Goodness knows why, the original material is so rich in detail, there's plenty to choose from without invention from the writer.  She appears to be back-tracking on what she said in early interviews last year; we want it to be as close to the books as possible. Ummm...

Aunt Agatha in the books is a wily old bird, hearing much more than she lets on, but her playing with cards of any sort does not feature.  She also keeps much of her knowledge to herself, which could be done on TV by clever intimation and camera angles.  I sometimes wonder if filming people feel they have to 'dumb-down' because we wouldn't understand subtlety.  This whole series would, to my mind, have benefitted from having some of R&Ds thoughts voiced - they have done some flashbacks - so I think it could work.  Instead, too many of the characters get to know what they ought not to know - viz 9th May event.

Agatha will no doubt have some fun with George, but in my opinion a lighter touch on some things would be an improvement.

What do others think?



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Date: Nov 1 2:40 PM, 2016
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You're welcome.

Tom Carne in Bodmin on a workday? Unless George put him up to it and paid his transportation to and from Illugan, which it doesn't appear that he did, it makes absolutely no sense. How did he even know about the trial? How could he afford to pass up a day's pay at the mine? The only way I see him adding anything to the scene is if Demelza then gets up to lead him from the courtroom, saying something like, "I'm so sorry, Your Honor. Please let me take him out. There, there, Father, I know you didn't want me to marry so young, but I love him. We're happy. But wait, where did you get the money to come here from Illugan? George Warleggan?" If Judge Lister is paying attention and if he has a good memory, he just might realize that she answered the question he had asked her right before George Warleggan interrupted them the previous night. But she didn't get up. She tried to blend into the crowd instead.



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Date: Nov 1 10:33 AM, 2016
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Thanks Dark Mare and Fijane! It really exasperate me when the BBC put this in the series that's not even in the books! It bothered me very much when they got Demelza's father in Ross's trial, and her father being a street preacher!! As far as I can remember you don't even see Demelza's father in the books Jeremy Poldark and Warleggan! George did never stop Demelza in speaking to the Judge! 



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Date: Nov 1 5:26 AM, 2016
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I just checked the Kindle editions of the first four books and there is no mention of Aunt Agatha playing with cards of any kind.

If Debbie Horsfeld had kept George's parents alive, Agatha's tarot reading could have provided an interesting scene in the next series. In "The Black Moon," George's mother was depicted as extremely superstitious and a little afraid of Agatha, and the day Valentine was born, George's father was worried about Agatha and his wife being in the same house -- especially after Agatha started talking about the eclipse being a bad omen.



-- Edited by Dark Mare on Tuesday 1st of November 2016 05:27:07 AM

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Date: Nov 1 2:59 AM, 2016
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ModernPoldark wrote:

Hi I have a question to ask about Aunt Agatha.

Did Aunt Agatha read tarot cards in the Poldark books? Because I don't recall ever reading about her tarot cards, I've read the first five books of the saga, and I don't remember reading about it. Can someone say if I'm wrong or not? confuse


 I don't remember it, and I would have if she had done so. It is one of the changes that the new series makes.



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Date: Oct 31 9:42 PM, 2016
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Hi I have a question to ask about Aunt Agatha.

Did Aunt Agatha read tarot cards in the Poldark books? Because I don't recall ever reading about her tarot cards, I've read the first five books of the saga, and I don't remember reading about it. Can someone say if I'm wrong or not? confuse



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Date: Aug 19 9:11 AM, 2013
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Oh Yes! Not only does she symbolically represent the long history of the POLDARKS as oposed to the 'upstart' Warleggans, she was the catalyst that provoked the final destructive blow to Elizabeth (and therefore George).



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Date: Jul 24 9:24 PM, 2013
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Did Aunt Agatha play an important role in Poldark ?



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Date: May 1 2:51 PM, 2011
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Aunt Agatha.



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"Perfection is a full stop .... Ever the climbing but never the attaining Of the mountain top." W.G.

 

 

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