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Post Info TOPIC: Rev. Osborne Whitworth


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RE: Rev. Osborne Whitworth
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Collective Wisdom,

Can we believe anything Ossie says?  He claims that, unlike Morwenna, his first wife doted on him. But he seems to be a classic sociopath. He is a preening, arrogant, remorseless man and a pathological liar. He even lies to himself about his relationship with Rowella.  In one of his internal rants, he actually appears outraged at the thought that he would be involved with Rowella. He is evaluating his options about putting Morwenna away and says:

"However, if she continued to go downhill and began to suffer delusions - such as her wild fantasy that he had been carrying on with her repulsive sister - if that happened she might well imagine that she had been molested against her will, and then was John safe?"

I can't decide if he is trying to delude himself or if he is practicing, like a criminal who wants to fool a polygraph, how to appear innocent and outraged if ever confronted.    

So I wonder if, as was questioned earlier, his first wife did care for him. Or, if she was happy to escape his creepy clutches even if it meant that death was the only out.

 

 



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I love Ossie's reaction in the trailer, when he's standing in the hall at Trenwith and suddenly sees Aunt Agatha giving him the evil eye from the gallery above!



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His eyes unnerve me. Or maybe that's just because I know what he will do.



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He looks like someone without a conscience.



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Cu_lCqfWEAAGe1M.jpg

Christian Brassington is cast as Osborne Whitworth.



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Mrs. Gimlett, 

 

It is mentioned that, when Drake pursues Morwenna straight after Osborne's death and watches her from the woods, she is standing by the river holding the hands of Sarah and Anne. It is a repeated image from an earlier part of the novel when the subject of Leda and the Swan is brought up. It is likely that, given this scene, the girls also stayed with Lady Whitworth once Osborne died and Morwenna left. 

 

Morwenna



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Mrs. Gimlett -- I was trying to be playful with Ossie's version of the Poldark-Warleggan feud. There's no mystery who started the story that Ross tried to leave Demelza for Elizabeth. Demelza did at Sir Hugh's birthday party, but she didn't do it intentionally. Hoping to get Malcolm McNeil to stop trying to get her into bed and leave her room, she told him her whole sad story. She thought he hadn't been listening and finally bit him in desperation, but maybe he had been listening and he told someone who later filled in the rest of the story as it came to pass and then distributed it. After all, several of the north coast's top gossips and intelligence gatherers were at the party, including Ossie's mother -- and Joan Pasco (but I don't think she would ever carry that tale home to her father). If Sir Hugh had heard it, he would have been on Demelza's doorstep as soon as his guests left. He wasn't so he must not have heard it.

As for what happened to Ossie's two daughters after his death, I went searching for clues and found few. I suspect they went to Lady Whitworth's home along with John Conan and Morwenna because the girls fell in the middle of Lady Whitworth's "firmly fixed priorities," which revealed themselves during the family meeting held after Ossie's funeral and "well-furnished but simple tea" to discuss the future: "First came John Conan; second, but a poor second, Ossies two daughters by his first wife; and third, but so far third as to be hardly noticeable, Morwenna."
 
I know Lady Whitworth had grudgingly mentioned having a place on her estate that they could live in: 
 
There was a cottage on her property near Goran, Lady Whitworth grudgingly admitted, where a rascally shepherd now lived who had let it fall to ruin, but he could be turned out and with a pound or two spent it might be made into a cosy little home. Unfortunately, there was no well water nearer than the main house, and John Conan could not be expected to drink whatever fell into the rain tub. 
 
Given that the current occupant had to be put out of it and repairs would be needed, it is possible the family was living under Lady Whitworth's roof awaiting the completion of the needed work. I say this because when Morwenna arrived at Drake's shop, she told him she had left Lady Whitworth's home early that morning. Morwenna said she had gone into the old woman's bedroom before she was up to tell her she was leaving. (That seems more likely to have happened if she was living in the house. If she lived elsewhere on the estate, she would have had to get past one or more servants to get into Lady Whitworth's bedroom.) 

"She said she would have me stopped; she said she would 
call the servants, get me locked up - then have me put away, she said, as Osborne had once tried to have me put away; I said she had no right - no one had any right - I was a widow now; anyway, what did she care, I asked her, about me? What did she care? I was only an expense and a nuisance; I was going to leave her my son ... my son."


I can't imagine that Lady Whitworth would have turned out her two granddaughters and kept her grandson. It would shift the gossips' attention away from Morwenna's desertion.
 
I'm glad you piqued my curiosity with this. It led me to find the passage that had given me the idea that Morwenna was raped repeatedly by Ossie. Morwenna is explaining to Drake what happened to her:
 
"... After John - my baby - was born, I was ill, and I was more ill and sick in spirit when I found that Osborne, while I was ill, had taken another woman; I cannot tell you who it was, but to me it was so physically degrading - so degrading - not that I ever wanted him back! ... Oh, I am telling this so very badly! ... 
 
"Then after some months - I cant recollect how many months - this other woman, she left, and he wanted to resume his relationship with me. I refused - and we had vile quarrels. I continued to refuse him, and made terrible threats. For a long time - I think it must have been two years, I did not let him touch me ... But then, only about six weeks before he died it - came about ... well, he forced himself on me. And after that. Not just once, you see. When it had begun, it happened again and again ..."


-- Edited by Ross Poldark on Friday 26th of August 2016 01:01:31 PM

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Dark Mare, I think you are trying to read too much into Osborne's words.

His mother was always a source of gossip, mostly supposition, and delighted in getting her head together with Mrs Teague, when they would speculate about Ross and other eligible gentlemen.

I think Ossie rambled on about Ross, Elizabeth and Demelza to Morwenna,  just repeating the things his mother had said.  There was never really going to be any likelihood of Ross running off with Elizabeth, even after May 9th.  She wouldn't want an even more precarious existence than she was already experiencing and Ross, as WG says, had nothing to offer her.  He was almost bankrupt, had no other house than Nampara, which he would never have taken Elizabeth to;  and no real prospects.  It was all hearsay, mainly cooked up from a few overheard snippets, I don't doubt. As for the rest,  even someone more dim than Ossie would realise when George married Elizabeth, Ross wouldn't be happy about it.

However.

After I read your post, I was struck by something I have never thought about before.

After Ossie died, Morwenna went to live with Lady Whitworth, who took John Conan in hand.  She had no regard for Morwenna.  But what happened to Sarah and Anne, his two little girls?  Not a mention of them after his death, so far as I remember.  I haven't actually checked this, but cannot recollect anything further about them.  Perhaps they went to Gorran with Lady W too, but I don't think WG ever says so.



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I was looking for something in "The Four Swans" and happened upon a mystery on Page 42:
 
Morwenna sighed. ... "Tell me about that. What is the cause of the feud between the Poldarks and the Warleggans? Everyone knows of it, but no one speaks of it." 
 
"You angle for a fish that is not in my pond. All I know is that its something to do with some jealous rivalry. Elizabeth
Chynoweth was promised to Ross Poldark and instead married his cousin Francis. Some years later, Francis was killed in a mining accident, and Ross wanted to throw over his kitchen maid, whom hed married in the meantime, and take Elizabeth. But Elizabeth would have none of it and married George Warleggan, who had been Rosss sworn enemy ... ever since they were at school together ..."
 
I can't imagine how I missed this before. When I read it this time, I wondered where he had gotten this idea. From what we as readers know, Ossie described what Demelza feared was happening, not what was. (George's proposal, not an offer by Ross to leave Demelza, set events in motion. If Elizabeth had rejected Ross, she wouldn't be angry when he never came back to see her after May 9th because he preferred Demelza to her. She'd be relieved that he was accepting her choice of George.) So where did Ossie get the story? Surely not Demelza, but who else knew what she thought -- actually feared -- was happening?
 
Did Ossie piece all this together during Sir Hugh's birthday party, conveniently held two nights after the May 9th incident? Did the ever-ambitious parson cozy up to fellow guests Nicholas and Mary Warleggan, hoping to lay the groundwork for landing the living at Cardew at some future date, and find out all about George's forthcoming wedding -- and maybe even his parents' misgivings about the bride? Did a disappointed Captain McNeil go straight to bed after being rebuffed by Demelza or did he first unburden himself to Ossie? If so, had McNeil actually been listening to Demelza while he was pawing her and had he retained enough to figure out what Ross had done and had yet to do -- or at least what Demelza believed he had done and had yet to do? (Remember, at that point Demelza still believed Ross would be leaving her imminently and had moved into his father's bedroom to remain faithful to his fragile lily, Elizabeth, not to spare his heartbroken and furious wife the trouble of banishing him from their bedroom.) If so, did McNeil share that with Ossie? That's the only way I can see for Ossie to get Demelza's version without actually talking to her. But could McNeil really be that big of a rat? 
 
The one other person from whom Ossie could have gained intelligence about Ross was Notary Pearce, who was both Ross' lawyer and Ossie's whist-playing buddy. (Can a lawyer who has embezzled from clients' trusts be counted on to keep clients' confidences?) But Ross didn't learn of Elizabeth's engagement until after he had returned from Truro on May 9th so unless he had gone to see Pearce for legal advice on how to end an inconvenient marriage on a tight budget before Elizabeth accepted George's proposal, there was no opportunity for Pearce to know Ross was thinking of trading in Demelza on Elizabeth. And if Pearce didn't know that, how could he tell Ossie? Actually, if Ross had gone to see Pearce about dumping Demelza, wouldn't WG have considered that a fact worth sharing? 
 
Am I missing someone else who could have been Ossie's source of information? Oh wait, do I see Joan Pascoe on Sir Hugh's guest list? Her father, Harris Pascoe, is the most plugged-in man in Cornwall as well as Ross' banker and friend and the banker who handles Notary Pearce's client trust accounts. I have always suspected Joan to be her father's leading information gatherer, but would McNeil tell a woman about his disappointing visit to Demelza and what she had told him about Ross and Elizabeth? Especially a woman whose father is a member of Ross' inner circle. Or is Joan an accomplished observer and eavesdropper?
 
Am I missing anyone else? Here are some snippets on the party and its guest list to check: 
 
Loc 3904, "Warleggan" 
The drive of Werry House led out upon a coaching road, so most of the guests who came from central and southern parts of the county had arrived in their carriages. Six was evidently the fashionable time, for Demelza had to wait her turn before she could ride up to the front door, and she was the object of numerous raised quizzing glasses. She bore the scrutiny coldly, sitting straight-backed in her dark riding habit and tricorn hat. 
 
Hugh and his stepmother were just inside the door, having been lured into the hall from an interesting discussion with John Treneglos on farcy in horses. Demelza came just on the heels of Mr and Mrs Nicholas Warleggan and heard Mr Warleggans apology. George had very urgent business and presented his compliments and regrets. Following her were a couple whom she vaguely recognized as Lord and Lady Devoran. Lord Devoran was a friend of Rosss.
 
 
Loc. 3962, "Warleggan"
All of fifty people in the room, which had been decorated with lilac and daffodils. Sir John Trevaunance had come but not Unwin. Mr Ray Penvenen was there, although he did not dance and looked very pale and austere among it all. Robert Bodrugan, Sir Hughs only nephew and heir presumptive, had come, and she had two dances with him during the early part of the evening. All the Teague family, and three of the Boscoignes, and Richard Treneglos, Johns second brother, and Joan Pascoe, the bankers daughter - but not Dwight Enys; and William Hick, and Mrs and Mrs Barbary, and Peter St Aubyn Tresize, and the Hon. Mrs Maria Agar, and Lady Whitworth and her son, who was now a parson, and Lieutenant and Mrs Carruthers, and dozens more. 
 
The above mystery was preceded by this account of Dwight and Caroline's wedding. I include it because I thought it was interesting how a single dress can make 
such an impression on a fashion-conscious person that it shapes his opinion of its wearer, and yet he doesn't 
recognize that he had been seeing the same dress.  
 
Page 41, "The Four Swans"
"It was a fair enough company today. But some of the fashions were unbearably dated. Did you see the Teague girls? And that man Poldark, his coat must have been cut half a century ago." 
 
"He is a brave man." 
 
Ossie settled more comfortably in the bed and yawned. "His wife keeps her looks uncommon well." 
 
"Well, shes still young, isnt she?" 
 
"Yes, but usually the vulgars go off more quick than those who are gentle bred ... She used to make quite an exhibition of herself a few years ago at the receptions and balls - when he had first married her, that was." 
 
"Exhibition?" 
 
"Well, flaunting herself, attracting the men, I can tell you. She wore low-cut frocks ..  She greatly fancied herself. Still does, I suspicion."
 
I thought Ossie was being quite the hypocrite considering that he was one of those men so attracted to Demelza. I wondered about the "low-cut frocks" comment so I went looking for events they had both attended and what Demelza had worn each time. There were two events -- the Celebration Ball in 1789 and Sir Hugh's birthday party -- and she'd worn the same frock, the silver one Ross had bought her as a surprise for the ball, to both. 
 
Demelza herself had doubts about the frock when she first put it on, but no one else seemed to. (Indeed, Lady Whitworth, Ossie's mother, admired the frock and had mistaken it for one made in London, as she told Demelza when they were introduced at the ball.) 
 
Page 195, "Demelza"
 
... Well, she was in it. It wasnt decent, she was sure of that, but the maid didnt seem to think anything was amiss. Of course other women wore that sort of thing; it was all the fashion. But other women might be used to that sort of gown; she was not. 
 
It was the same general shape as the afternoon gown Verity had bought her, only more so. The afternoon dress was cut away from her neck and the tops of her shoulders, but this one was so much lower. It was amazingly ruched at the sides, and there was a lot of beautiful lace hanging over her hands, where she didnt need it. 
 
The second time she wore it was four years later. Demelza had gone to that party looking to get even with a unfaithful husband so Ossie was probably right about her flaunting herself that time and the change in her figure might have made the frock seem especially low-cut.
 
Loc. 3933, "Warleggan"
 
About seven she began to dress, sponging her body and putting on clean and flimsier underclothes. There was very little one could wear under this dress, which Ross had bought her for the Celebration Ball of 89 and which she had not worn since. She had changed very little in figure since then, but found it a little tighter in the bodice and a little less tight in the waist.
 


-- Edited by Ross Poldark on Sunday 21st of August 2016 10:25:21 PM

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I'm not really sure if I'm posting this in the right place...but...

Currently re-reading The Angry Tide, whenever I read anything to do with Osborne all I can think of is BIGGINS!  He played it so well, he made my skin crawl.  He did that whole puffing himself up thing, which is often described in the books, so well!

I just cannot imagine who is going to play him in the new series.  Has anyone got any ideas of who they might want to play Osborne?

Biggins is getting on a bit now, so he can't really reprise it...



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I often wonder what his first marriage must have been like, and if his first wife ever grew to dislike him as much as Morwenna did.  And his tow daughters, what were their true feelings toward him?



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Brigantia wrote:

He wasn't very kind (in a different way, of course) to his poor little curate (Odgers), creaming off all the church income and letting Odgers do all the hard work.


 I think he wanted to controll everybody.  He had an inflated sense of his own importance.



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He wasn't very kind (in a different way, of course) to his poor little curate (Odgers), creaming off all the church income and letting Odgers do all the hard work.



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He's a sex offender of the worst sort. Morewena deserves a VC for surviving him.



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QueenMab wrote:

Villian. He is deplorable!

The way he starts to quote the bible to Morwenna, before assaulting her, was truly chilling. There's a point that I'd like to mention. There's a part in The four Swans, or possbily The Angry tide where he keeps changing nannies for his son. He always picks old, unattractive ones, so he's feelings are not aroused! But I wondered if there was a paranoia there? I thought it was implied he thought they were in league with Morwenna?

I actually question Ossie's sanity. One thing is, that he got worse as the books went on. We read about hints about his odd ways with feet( !!) . Plus his visits to a houses of ill repute...I wondered if the character may actually have contracted a certain type of disease which effected his sanity? Pock marks weren't mentioned, but that would be a give away!

He met his match in Rowenna, but I think those two almost deserved each other.


I actually felt like cheering when he died!! I was so pleased. It was actually very funny that scene on the TV series. I thought Chistopher Biggins played Ossie very well. It was a more toned down version of course.

Morwenna is always mentally scarred by Ossie, so I can't like his character ever. It's true the way women were treated in marriage wasn't the same perception as now. Plus the law in this country had no sympathy for wives. But as a Vicar, he should have had compassion towards others which he didn't. He was completely unholy.





 I think he is even worse than George Warleggan, because although George had sexist views, he didn't treat women as violently as Ossie.  I agree there is reason to question his sanity.



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Rev. Osborne Whitworth.



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RE: Osborne Whitworth - why Ossie?
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Yes, considering a time when some girls would adress their fathers as Sir, we wonder..

Using a nickname for someone could be seen as being rather presumptuous. The name Ossie, conjures up (for me) a rather comical image.  Calling Osborne would be more respectful, which is why I'm pretty sure that's why some character's call him Ossie. I know that WG would have his own brilliant reasons about this.

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Slightly self-explanatory, 'Ossie' was just a nickname.
I often wondered why Morwenna called him Ossie. They were far from close. confuse.gif

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Does anyone know why Osborne Whitworth's nickname is Ossie? I read it quite a lot and just wonder why this name is used.

Also in the later books, Demelza, Sam and Drake's niece, Esther Carne, is introduced and she is sometimes referred to as Essie. Which provides the same question.



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RE: Rev. Osbourne Whitworth: Villain Or Fop?
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Villian. He is deplorable!

The way he starts to quote the bible to Morwenna, before assaulting her, was truly chilling. There's a point that I'd like to mention. There's a part in The four Swans, or possbily The Angry tide where he keeps changing nannies for his son. He always picks old, unattractive ones, so he's feelings are not aroused! But I wondered if there was a paranoia there? I thought it was implied he thought they were in league with Morwenna?

I actually question Ossie's sanity. One thing is, that he got worse as the books went on. We read about hints about his odd ways with feet( !!) . Plus his visits to a houses of ill repute...I wondered if the character may actually have contracted a certain type of disease which effected his sanity? Pock marks weren't mentioned, but that would be a give away!

He met his match in Rowenna, but I think those two almost deserved each other.


I actually felt like cheering when he died!! I was so pleased. It was actually very funny that scene on the TV series. I thought Chistopher Biggins played Ossie very well. It was a more toned down version of course.

Morwenna is always mentally scarred by Ossie, so I can't like his character ever. It's true the way women were treated in marriage wasn't the same perception as now. Plus the law in this country had no sympathy for wives. But as a Vicar, he should have had compassion towards others which he didn't. He was completely unholy.






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Whitworth as the really eeeevil Mr. Collins?

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Thanks Allison, I'm looking forward to reading what you come up with!

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Maire, thanks for the approving comment.  I want you to know how MUCH I appreciate your work on the music in Poldark.  I have followed every link you posted.  I recognized a few other tunes and  as a result of your wonderful work I will watch and listen again and perhaps I will be able to add to what you've done.
I truly love the research/historical/literary part of this whole forum because it makes me feel that I am really a part of the time and connected not only to the characters but also to others who, like me, live in both the 21st AND the 18th centuries!  Thanks again.

-- Edited by Alison on Friday 10th of April 2009 11:03:16 PM

-- Edited by Alison on Friday 10th of April 2009 11:04:15 PM

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Well said Alison, you've expressed my feelings exactly.  Like you, I'm an American fan came late to the world of Poldark.  I only just watched series 2 summer 2008, and read the books with Osborne this winter. Certainly, Biggins doesn't fit my physical picture of Ossie from the books.

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As an American who only saw the Poldark tapes just this past year (although I was definitely around when they were aired on Masterpiece Theatre here, I just was oblivious) my initial take on Osbourne was that he was poorly cast because he seemed so gay (not just foppish) and it was hard to believe he had such a sex drive where Morwenna was concerned.  I would have been much more comfortable with his character if he were having an affair with a footman or groom or houseboy.  At the time I was watching I didn't know who Christopher Biggins is, and I understand he is very talented, and also very popular in the UK, and also openly gay and involved in gay pride activities.  I think the casting was wrong, and that the Osbourne in the book was much more believable.  I can imagine an Osborne more like Ralph Fiennes in The Duchess, sort of attractive but not likable.

So I guess my vote is that in the tv series Osbourne was/is a fop, and in the book a villain.

-- Edited by Alison on Friday 10th of April 2009 04:08:36 AM

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I would say both too, and lean towards fop.   I agree with Caroline that the marriage is to be laid at George's door.  Ossie wasn't all that smart - he could not see that Morwenna found him distasteful - that was not going to make Ossie happy.  Though I guess he figured she'd get over it.   Ossie had one of those practical attitudes, and required a wife who looked at things that way, too, not someone with tendencies towards romance.  George assumed way too much about the people involved in thinking he had made a good match.

I noticed that Ossie is described as "good looking" in the books.  In casting them, I don't think they presented him as attractive physically.  It was strange for Elizabeth to claim he was "good looking."

ETA:  I think Ossie may not be much of a villain.  He is one of those unimaginative people who conforms and does what one is supposed to do.  Such people are usually aggravated by and cannot understand people not doing what one is supposed to do.  It doesn't occur to him that such people even exist, so Morwenna's intransigence annoys him more than anything.  It is a mystery to him why she would be unhappy. 

But the main thing is that he doesn't scheme to get what he wants.  He does it the way one is "supposed" to do it, writing his endless letters.  What he wants is pretty standard.  He's the one bested usually, by Rowella, for example.  He does not feel in control, blaming Morwenna for his involvement with Rowella.  Rowella gets the better of him twice, playing on his weakness.  George leads him into a marriage that is bad for him.  

-- Edited by august1229 at 14:24, 2008-05-27

-- Edited by august1229 at 14:28, 2008-05-27

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Thank you for your response. shocked.gif
I'm taken aback that this forum is active again.  I had all but given up hope.  And just when you, Greg, had come up with an entertaining Poldark word association game! Around the time you had started that, I had lost all Internet accsess and when I got it back, the forums had been closed.
I have been talking, albiet briefly, with Caroline on the IBDB (Internet Book Data Base), I shall try and contact her to tell her the forums here are once again active.
As for the poll I'd posted, you're quite right! I'd never thought of Monk Adderley as the fop, but in hindsight, it's quite true.  I think at the time I posted the poll, I was trying anything to get the boards active.
Thank you for posting, and thank you to Ross (or whomever), got these forums operating again.  It is most appreciated.
--G. Warleggan ESQ :^$

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Hi George....long time ! wink

Finally got around to reading all the books at last ! Started in I think October '07 so 6 months isn't too bad ! biggrin  As for answering old posts - yeah well ! weirdface

I like what Caroline said especially the bit about Georgian attitudes compared to today's but I think perhaps underneath there's not all that much difference....

So villian or fop ? A question of degrees I think. I know it's a poll but leaving that aside for the moment - neither really. Keeping it within WG's world I would say Paul Kellow was the true villian just as much then as he would be today, whilst the fop would obviously have been Monk Adderley. Rather Osborne was perhaps too spoilt by his mother just as much as his son (Conan ?) eventually was, so an overweening sense of self importance possibly linked to a huge inferiority complex (Lady Whitworth being a very domineering woman so a mother too ?), definitely a misplaced arrogance instead of true humility for a man of the cloth, all combined with a lack of consideration for others, especially Morwenna, unless it suited him (too much like George) seems to fit the bill better. So it's very difficult to feel any sympathy for him at all especially if you compare him with Edward (Clowance's husband) or Hugh Armitage ....?

So too difficult to answer - half and half, bit of a villian and bit of a fop !! biggrin

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Date: Apr 19 10:33 AM, 2007
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Sorry, I didn't like him at all...too much wrapped up in himself, any decent man would have done as the doctor said, regardless of the time it was set in.

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Date: Nov 1 6:56 AM, 2006
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i dont like him either in the books or the dvd series.
i cheer when he died and when drake and morwenna got married.
the world was as it is should be when they got together.
3 cheers for the death of the sleeze osbourne

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Date: Oct 31 4:06 PM, 2006
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I can't say how Ross feels about it, but as far as I'm concerned, never apologise for bringing up old posts! It's nice to see this board active, regardless how old the posts are! (Hmm, I'm in the US and spelled it 'apologise,' I think the UK is possessing me more and more. Ah, well, Z's are ugly letters, anyway!).
Your reply was well thought out, and better described what I felt as Osbourne as well. Shock is exactly what Mr. Graham intended with this character, I'm sure, and his research was impeccable.
Since I still haven't read the books, I can't be certain, but I think that Rowella and Arthur Solway ran such a con job on Whitworth regarding the pregnancy...it's only brought out in sly looks in the series, but I'm sure she knew all along she wasn't pregnant with Osbourne's child. :^/


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Date: Oct 31 3:08 PM, 2006
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Sorry to bring up old posts. It's what happens when you stay away too long!


I've never been able to make a decision on this. Certainly the character turns my stomach and Chris Biggins  was exceptional in his portrayal. (About the time Poldark 2 was being made, I was watching him in the best kid's TV show of all time, Rentaghost!)


What I am wary of doing though, when thinking about these characters, is seeing them through C21st eyes. My historical knowledge is not wide enough to know very much, but I'm pretty sure that marriages such as Ross/Demelza and Dwight/Caroline were the exception rather than the rule. Doesn't Caroline say that at one point? I think the George/Elizabeth relationship was a more realistic one for the class and time. Even then, they were very moral. Elizabeth has pangs of guilt about Valentine's parentage that I sometimes feel were C20th pangs and not C18th, but I digress...


Therefore, the demands that Ossie put on Morwenna may not be as shocking to Georgian society as they are to us. Wives had a very particular role and she was falling down on that. Ossie was a public figure and expected his wife to be also.


And I do think that he was taken in by Rowella but should have known better? I don't know. He was conceited, arrogant. A young girl paying attentions to him flattered his vanity and caught him at a time when he needed that attention. And remember that 16 year od girls were 'older' then than now. She wasn't so wet behind the ears as we might think. Ossie wasn't a stupid man, but Rowella was far cleverer and would probably have deceived anyone she set her sights on.


But I also feel sorry for him towards the end. Imagine his disappointment. When it comes to it, all he wanted was a wife that would fulfill all the traditional roles. And Morwenna did not. I blame George! It was him forcing Morwenna into a marriage she didn't want that ultimately led to his downfall. Sorry George...


To sum up, and apologies for waffling about nothing, I really dislike this character, but I like the way he was drawn. More fop than villain for me.


C.P.E.



-- Edited by Caroline Penvenen Enys at 15:09, 2006-10-31

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Date: May 14 2:36 PM, 2006
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Glad someone actually replied to this..for some reason, this character stands out to me, probably because I saw the BBC episodes at such a young age, and my mom had to explain in detail to me about death for the first time (when he gets dragged by the horse); a task she did not enjoy.

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Date: May 14 4:11 AM, 2006
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Oh most definitely villian. Even just thinking about him makes my skin crawl.

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Date: Apr 27 3:45 PM, 2006
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No book or TV series would be as interesting without its villains.  George Warleggan is the obvious one in the series, but I've always had mixed feelings about Osbourne.  I tend to feel sorry for him towards the end, and wonder if anyone else feels this way?  So..voting time!

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