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Post Info TOPIC: George Warleggan


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Date: Mar 11 7:40 AM, 2017
RE: George Warleggan
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George Warleggan has always insisted that his children are not related to Ross and Demelza's children. The twins aren't, but Elizabeth's three children (Ursula and Valentine Warleggan and Geoffrey Charles Poldark) and Demelza's five are connected through the marriage of Morwenna Chynoweth (Elizabeth's first cousin) and Drake Cairn (Demelza's brother) -- a union that George would just as soon forget.

Drake and Morwenna's daughter, Loveday Cairn, is first cousin to Demelza's brood; second cousin to Elizabeth's; first cousin once removed to Noelle Poldark, Jeremy's daughter; second cousin once removed to Geoffrey Charles' girls; and second cousin once removed to Georgie Warleggan. 

Geoffrey Charles is tied in even more closely, being a first cousin once removed to Morwenna, which makes him a first cousin once removed by marriage to Drake, Demelza's brother and GC's best friend, and first cousin once removed to Ross, making him a first cousin once removed by marriage to Demelza. He is half-brother to Valentine and Ursula and a two-times second cousin to the Nampara Poldarks through each of their parents. 

Demelza is Valentine's first cousin once removed by marriage, but Ross is either his father or no relation to him at all. (That's gotta be weird.) Ursula is only a first cousin once removed by marriage to Demelza, no connection to Ross.



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Date: Mar 11 7:33 AM, 2017
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Hollyhock,

George worked hard to keep Ursula away from the Nampara Poldarks so I'm not sure whether she ever got to attend any of the parties at Trenwith. It's like all she's ever gotten to do was play with her mine toy. 

I've always thought Ursula would have a career, rather than marry, and it would be in mining or banking maybe.  She was named for her mother's godmother and great aunt, who was an early feminist, so it seems appropriate that she would pick up that torch. Then again, her mother's tragic story could inspire her to study midwifery or even medicine. I think she above all is owed a happy adult life.



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Student

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Date: Mar 10 10:15 PM, 2017
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LoL Dark Mare biggrin

You know, Valentine was so much in the forefront that I had forgotten about GC and Ursula's relationship. I don't recall them ever interacting, did they?

But I wouldn't want Ursula to inherent Wheal Elizabeth. I would rather have that go to Henry and little Georgie, who would probably need the income. I believe the detestable George would have left Ursula well provided for, especially if, as he wanted, she married a man who would take the Warleggan name. Of course, if George got his just desserts, such a man would probably drink, gamble, and party his way through the Warleggan fortune--just as the trifling St John Peter had done with banker Pasco's money. 



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Date: Mar 10 8:35 PM, 2017
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Poor George, he just never got it. He thought he was living the real world so he expected good and bad luck to be distributed randomly and roughly equally. He didn't sign up to be the villain in a novel, let alone 12 of them. Unfair! I laugh every time something new lands in Ross' lap that George really wants.  Especially the things Ross doesn't want and essentially regifts to George  -- the magistrate post, the seat in Parliament. Poor George is always so thrilled.  

George is pathetic. He works so hard to use people for his own gain, and all off these people who are supposed to help him rise in the world turn out to need him more than he needs them.  Not one seems able to deliver the helpful introduction or access he was counting on. Why doesn't he learn? Could it be because he sees Ross rising in the world with the help of important friends who need nothing from him except maybe the occasional vote in Parliament?

George got it wrong where Ross' title was concerned. He thought it was a normal one, meaning it was earned before it was bestowed, but Ross needed a title to be able to do the thing he earned it for.   Anyone think George would be willing to be locked up as a political prisoner for weeks to become a baronet? 

The funny thing about his hatred of Jeremy is he had a legitimate reason to detest Ross' son -- his role in the stage coach affair -- but he doesn't know it so he wastes his hatred on petty things. Instead, he puts all his energy into trying to tie Stephen Carrington to the theft and is repeatedly thwarted. Stephen is guilty, but George can't prove it. Forget the third amigo, Paul Kellow. 

As for Bella's success, maybe it just baffles him. I imagine him reading about it in the paper, rolling his eyes and muttering, "No one ever went broke underestimating the taste of London theatre goers." (Apologies to H.L. Mencken.) George must recognize that Ursula has talents too, but as an upper-class woman, she will need to inherit a business to have a chance to show she can run one it. Sadly, I doubt he sees that as an injustice so he is unlikely to do anything to change her little corner of the world. It's funny, the world is actually fairer for Jinny Scoble than Ursula Warleggan in that respect.

It would have been interesting if WG had made Elizabeth's children close and let Wheal Elizabeth, Valentine's mine, be inherited by Ursula, the Warleggan child who spent much of her youth playing with the mine toy, keeping cost books and all sorts of other records for it. (WG went back to that scene so often that it seemed to be foreshadowing.) Better still would have been the discovery of a copper lode profitable enough to pay for the reopening of Grambler under Geoffrey Charles and Ursula's joint management with an engine made from Jeremy's design. Maybe that was supposed to be Book 13.

 



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Date: Mar 7 9:16 PM, 2017
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I always find it extremely satisfying to witness George's jealous reactions when Ross succeeds at anything. So, it was especially pleasing to see George's impotent rage when he learned that Ross had been knighted.

"George Warleggan was in a bad temper...today his mood was of the blackest. He told himself it didn't matter. It was no longer of the slightest importance to him what any of the shabby, pretentious Poldarks were up to. So why this black anger at an entry in The Times! He seldom glanced at the Court news. But just by chance his eyes glimpsed a name; then he read it. 'The Prince Regent has graciously bestowed a baronetcy upon Captain Ross Vennor Poldark, of Nampara in the county of Cornwall.'  Just that. Just three lines. It was the baronetcy that stuck in George's crop most, elevating his old enemy above the mere knights, ensuring that the title would go on..."(TTS)

I also remember how he secretly gloated when he learned of Jeremy's death. 

"He wondered if Harriet had heard yet about Jeremy. The first casualty lists had been issued on the 4th July, and his name had been on it. George supposed the whole county would know about it now. Personally he was going to shed no tears; he never had liked the tall, gangling young buck: typical Poldark with his arrogance and his pride. Well, now his (Ross') son was gone, and bad luck for him and for his contriving a baronetcy for his son to inherit..."

So, I'm wondering how he would have felt when he learned that Ross' daughter, Bella, had conquered the London theatrical world? Did he grab his heart in bitter anguish and was that the sword thrust that finally finished him off?  Ross standing over his grave would have been George's eternal disgrace. But it would have been poetic, and I don't think Harriet would have grieved for very long. Any other thoughts on how he might have felt? 

 



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Date: May 3 2:25 PM, 2016
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I think that the hatred towards Ross is borne from jealousy.  George always feels somehow inferior in society due to his poor background, he is looked down on for being 'new money' rather than gentry or aristocracy.  He is jealous of the way Ross carries everything off, he is at ease, confident, almost arrogant, even when he's so poor he hasn't got a pot to piss in!  Then, every success that Ross achieves is like another twist of the knife for George.

 



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Date: Apr 20 3:06 PM, 2016
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I didn't think there was any personal animosity against Ross on Nicholas' part until I read the following in "The Black Moon." After that, I reread some of his quotes (gotta love Kindle) and realized he also bore Ross malice. He just didn't want it to be evident to others in the business community because the Warleggans were now too big to bother with Ross. He just wasn't obsessed with ruining Ross the way Cary was


The turns and twists of life led to some strange results. Nicholass first visit here eleven years ago had been to the reception and banquet following Elizabeth Chynoweths marriage to the son of the house. 
Then the Poldarks, though impoverished enough, had seemed as securely settled here as they had been for the past hundred years, and the Trenwiths for another century and a half before them. 
Old Charles William had been alive, belching and stertorous but active enough, head of the house, of the district, of the clan, to be succeeded by Francis when the time came, a young and virile twenty-two who was to guess at his untimely death? then came daughter Verity, a plain little thing whod later made a poor marriage and lived now in Falmouth. 
Besides this there were the cousins: William Alfred, that thin sanctimonious clergyman and his brood, now gone to a living in Devon. 
And Ross Poldark, who unfortunately was still around, and prospering by all accounts, not yet having fallen down a mineshaft or been imprisoned for debt or transported for inciting to riot, as he so well deserved.
Sometimes the wicked and the arrogant flourished, against all reasonable probability. 
 
 
You are right about Ross always thwarting George -- even when he doesn't realize he's done it   -- and yet, he believes that George has a genius for turning defeats into victories. 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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Date: Apr 19 8:23 PM, 2016
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Well, Ross did cross swords with their cousin Matthew Sanson and threw him in the river!  Actually, I don't think Nicholas was that vindictive.  He felt aggrieved on George's behalf when Ross slighted him, but mostly I think to back George, rather than from any real malice.

Cary was the nasty one - always working away in the background doing what he could to hurt those who refused to kow-tow to the Warleggans. 

George was always insecure, whilst taking trouble to appear completely confident and in control and striving to be accepted.  Mention of Ross made him sweat.  And of course he was insanely jealous, mainly I think because Ross carried his confidence lightly, was accepted despite his libertarian views and didn't care what others thought (apart from his hair-shirt moments).

George constantly tried to best Ross, and as we know, Ross in the end always managed to succeed by fair means.



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Date: Apr 16 2:03 PM, 2016
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Does George hate Ross more than he loves Elizabeth? Or does he love Elizabeth more than he hates Ross? 

One more question: Can anyone explain to me why George's father, uncle and cousin are as invested in destroying Ross as George is? Yes, he did smart off to Nicholas at Jim Carter's trial, but what else has he done to them? Or are the Warleggans just that clannish? Why do I have the feeling there was some serious teasing or even bullying done by Ross when they were children, and Joshua and Charles didn't take the matter seriously enough to please the older Warleggans? 

What I find especially odd is Ross genuinely seems to respect Nicholas and does not suspect any residual ill will. However, we know it exists. Strange.

 



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Date: Mar 26 2:48 AM, 2016
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Love and attraction can be complex emotions I believe. Perhaps there is, in Georges desire for Elizabeth, a strong desire to thwart Ross by 'possessing' her. I suspect that he felt that his status would rise too; in his barely hidden inferiority complex is the drive to make the recently exhibited material things overshadow the historic facts of his lowly background. Doesn't work of course. Not for his haughty social circle, nor for himself... 



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Date: Mar 2 4:38 PM, 2016
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I've just finished reading the part in Warleggan where Elizabeth agrees to marry George.  There's this passage at the end of the chapter:

"Though intention had not been in it, he suddenly found the prospect before him dazzlingly good - first because it gave him this woman whom he had loved and wanted for so long, second because by the same stroke it dealt what he knew would be the deadliest of blows at his bitterest enemy.  It was not given to many men, he felt, to achieve so much by a single coup."

Any chance that his desire of Elizabeth was ever influenced or encouraged by his hatred of Ross...?



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Date: May 1 2:41 PM, 2011
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George Warleggan.



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